Moab - Where Adventure Begins

To all of our Visitors, Domestic and International,

This time of the year in Moab is always so busy with visitors from all over the world coming to experience Arches, Canyonlands, Dead Horse Point, the Colorado River, and especially our unique town of Moab.

It is quite different today as we all are experiencing a very trying situation worldwide. We are aware of how this virus is impacting every country. We applaud all of the doctors, nurses, and everyone in the medical field who are working tirelessly through this trying time.

We hope that you and your family are practicing all of the recommendations for staying at home and social distancing. We are all in this together. We look forward to the day that you can visit with us, spend time in Moab, enjoy the outdoors and wide-open spaces in our area.

We are keeping the world in our hearts and wish each and everyone to stay healthy.

Elaine Gizler
Moab Area Travel Council


Moab Information Center

Welcome to Moab

Once you arrive in Moab, your first stop should be the Moab Information Center (MIC). Conveniently located at the corner of Main and Center Street in Moab, the MIC offers information on recreational opportunities and visitor services throughout southeastern Utah. Allow some time for the interpretive displays and large gift shop featuring guide books, maps, videos, videos, postcards, and much more.

 
  • Information about recreation opportunities in southeastern Utah
  • Current weather and road information
  • Information about hotels, restaurants, tours operators, shuttles, and other services for travelers
  • Interpretive displays
  • Gift shop featuring guide books, maps, videos, CD-ROMs, postcards, and much more
  • Free WiFi
  • Clean restrooms

Experience the stunning new film, “Welcome to Moab”, in the MIC’s 4K Ultra HD Theater

 

“Welcome to Moab” is an immersive 4K theater film that provides visitors with an outstanding overview of the public lands and diverse activities possible around Moab, Utah. Produced in 2017, the film combines impressive ultra-high-definition 4K footage, time lapse photography, and aerial perspectives of the ruggedly spectacular public lands that surround Moab. Watching this 20 minute film at the beginning of your visit will provide the best possible orientation for visiting this spectacular part of the world. The film is repeated throughout the day at the Moab Information Center.

You don’t have to wait until you get to Moab to watch the new “Welcome to Moab” film. The film is now available on Blu-ray & DVD! In addition to a great overview of all there is to see and do in the Moab area, the disc also includes:
  • Canyonlands by Air
  • Arches Winter’s Day
  • Moab Jeep Tour
  • Moab Mountain Biking
Click here to order your copy today.

MIC Lecture Series – From April to November each year, the Lecture Series presents talks by regional experts about the Moab region’s fascinating past and present, places and people, wildlife, plants, dinosaurs and more! Talks generally begin at 6:00 P.M. and are FREE to the public. Lectures are co-sponsored by the Museum of Moab. The Moab Information Center (MIC) is conveniently located on the corner of Main & Center Streets. For the latest schedule click here.

Canyonlands Natural History Association – If you need to purchase information prior to your visit, many of the guidebooks and maps for sale in the Moab Information Center are available from the Canyonlands Natural History Association. Visit their website at: www.cnha.org

Address:
Moab Information Center 25 E Center Street Moab, UT 84532
Hours:

Sunday through Saturday 8:00 am – 4:00 pm.
Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas

Location:


Arches National Park

Arches National Park

The world’s largest concentration of natural sandstone arches.

Introduction

Located just 5 miles (8 km) north of Moab is Arches National Park, which contains the world’s largest concentration of natural sandstone arches. Although over 2,000 arches are located within the park’s 76,518 acres, the park also contains an astounding variety of other geological formations. Colossal sandstone fins, massive balanced rocks, soaring pinnacles and spires dwarf visitors as they explore the park’s viewpoints and hiking trails. A paved scenic drive takes visitors to many of the major viewpoints within the park. The park’s rock formations delight children as well as adults, with many easy trails providing opportunities for kids to get out of the car and explore the arches up close. Hikers can choose from a wide variety of trails, from short twenty minute walks leading right up to many of the largest arches in the park, to more adventurous hikes into lesser seen areas.

Thank you for wearing a face covering in Moab.
Face coverings that completely cover the nose and mouth are now mandatory in Moab. They must be worn in public areas including indoor or outdoor space open to the public where consistent social distancing of at least 6 feet is not possible, reasonable or prudent. Free masks are available at the Moab Information Center, on the corner of Main and Center Streets, and at the national parks.

Distance from Moab
5 miles (8km)
Directions from Moab
The entrance of Arches is located 5 miles (8km) north of Moab, along highway 191.
Park Hours
Arches National Park is normally open year-round, 24 hours a day. The park is very busy between March and October. To avoid traffic, we recommend entering the park before 8 am or after 3 pm.
Entrance Fee
$30/vehicle – Good for 7 days. (Subject to change) Note: Fee collections are suspended until June 15, 2020.
Visitor Center & Hours
Inside temporarily closed. Visitor services available outside building.

The visitor center includes interactive exhibits, educational kiosks, a 150-seat auditorium, and a bookstore featuring guide books, maps, DVD’s, postcards, and much more. The park is open 24 hours/day, 365 days/year; however the visitor center hours vary by season. (435) 719-2299

MAP

WEBCAM 1

WEBCAM 2

Winter Sunset at Delicate Arch
The Three Gossips at Arches National Park
Arches National Park

Suggested Activities

A Few Hours
Drive the 36 mile (58km) round trip Scenic Drive.
1/2 Day
Drive the Scenic Drive and hike some of the easy short trails in the park, such as the Park Avenue Trail and trails in the Windows Section of the park.
Full Day

Drive the Scenic Drive and hike some of the longer trails in the park, such as the trails to Double O Arch, Tower Arch, Delicate Arch, and Landscape Arch.
Several Days
Hikers can experience a wide variety of hiking trails, including some of the lesser-seen, yet equally spectacular areas of the park such as the “Primitive Loop” in the Devil’s Garden section of the park.

Camping

Scheduled to open July 19, 2020.

The Devils Garden Campground is located eighteen miles from the park entrance and is open year-round. Facilities include potable water, picnic tables, grills, as well as both pit-style and flush toilets. There are no showers. Bring your own wood or charcoal for the grills. Some sites will accommodate RVs up to 30 feet in length.Telephone and on-line reservations for both group and individual sites may be made through recreation.gov. Reservations are not accepted by the park, and the park does not maintain information about site availability.

  • Individual Sites: You can reserve standard campsites up to 6 months in advance for stays March 1-October 31. All sites are usually reserved months in advance. Between November 1 and February 28, sites are first-come, first-served. Facilities include drinking water, picnic tables, grills, and both pit-style and flush toilets. You can reserve campsites for nights between March 1 and October 31. Between November 1 and February 28, all sites are first-come, first served. Phone and online reservations for both group and individual sites must be made through recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. You can make reservations for standard sites no fewer than four days and no more than 6 months in advance. The fee per night for an individual Devils Garden campsite i $25. Group size is limited to 10 people and 2 vehicles.
  • Group Sites: Group sites can be reserved up to 12 months in advance. The campground has two sites for groups of 11 or more people. Juniper Basin campsite accommodates up to 55 people and is available March 1 to October 31; Canyon Wren campsite accommodates up to 35 and may be reserved year-round. No RVs or trailers are permitted in the group sites.
Campsites are usually reserved months in advance during the busy season (March-October). If you have not reserved a site prior to arrival at the park during these months, plan on utilizing other camping options in the Moab area. There are no services inside Arches National Park. The nearest place to get food, gas, and supplies is Moab, approximately 45-60 minutes’ drive from the campground.

Food

Please note that food is not available within the park. The closest restaurants are either in the town of Moab, at Dead Horse Point State Park, or at the dinosaur museum at the intersection of Highways 191 and 313 (entrance fee is not required to access the restaurant).

Park Highlights

Delicate Arch in Arches National Park

Delicate Arch

Delicate Arch

People come from all over the world to visit Arches National Park, and visiting Delicate Arch is on the top of many visitors’ to-do lists. In a park with over 2,000 stone arches, this particular free-standing arch has become a widely recognized symbol of the state of Utah and one of the most famous geologic features in the world. The light opening beneath the arch is 46 feet high and 32 feet wide, making it the largest free-standing arch in the park.

Balanced Rock in Arches National Park

Balanced Rock

Balanced Rock

A short paved trail leads visitors to the base of Balanced Rock. The landform’s total height is 128 feet, with the huge balanced rock rising 55 feet above its base.

Landscape Arch in Arches National Park

Landscape Arch

Landscape Arch

The longest natural rock span in the world, this arch’s opening is 306 feet wide – 6 feet longer than a football field. A nine story building would easily fit beneath this thin span. In 1991, a massive slab of rock fell from its underside, resulting in an even thinner ribbon of rock.

Wildflowers in Arches National Park

Spring Wildflowers

Spring Wildflowers

April and May bring a variety of desert wildflowers to Arches.

Double Arch in Arches National Park

Double Arch

Double Arch

Located in the Windows Section of Arches National Park, Double Arch was used as a backdrop for portions of the 1988 movie “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade”. Numerous other movies have been filmed in Arches National Park, including Thelma and Louise in 1991.

Park Avenue Trail in Arches National Park

Park Avenue

Park Avenue

From Park Avenue parking area, the trail descends steeply into a spectacular canyon and continues down the wash to Courthouse Towers. If you have a shuttle driver, you can begin at one point and be picked up at the other. For round-trip hiking, retrace your steps along the trail rather than walk along the park road.

Arches National Park in Winter

Arches in Winter

Arches in Winter

Winter brings a blanket of pristine snow to Arches, providing dramatic contrast to the surrounding red rocks.

Hiking in Arches National Park

Family Hiking

Family Hiking

There are many family friendly hikes in Arches, including the hike to Turret Arch in the Windows Section.

Biological Soil Crust

Help to keep all of our trails open. Protect this fragile, but crucial, soil by remaining on designated roads, routes and trails at all times.

Biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, is the foundation of desert plant life. This black, knobby crust is made up of many different living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the desert ecosystem. However, this sensitive soil is extremely fragile and can take decades to grow. Even a footstep can damage the crust for decades, having lasting impacts on the desert environment. Please stay on the trials. Help to protect this fragile life by remaining on designated roads, routes, and trails at all times. Where hiking trails are not established, hike in sandy washes or on bare rock.

Hiking

One of the more rewarding ways to see the park is on foot. Arches features a wide variety of hikes, from short 10 minute walks (suitable for all ages) to 4 hour hikes into some of the remote sections of the park.

Easy Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Balanced Rock

0.3 mi (0.5 km) Round Trip

15-30 min

A loop trail around the base of a fragile, picturesque rock formation.

Broken Arch

1.2 mi (2 km) Round Trip or 2 mi (3.2 km) with loop

30-60 min

From the Sand Dune Arch parking area, the trail cuts across a large meadow to the arch and continues to the campground. Loop trail leads through fin canyons with sand dunes and slickrock.

Delicate Arch Viewpoint

100 yards (91 meters) round trip

10-15 min

In addition to the short accessible trail, another (moderately strenuous) hiking trail climbs one-half mile (0.8 km) toward Delicate Arch and ends at the rim of a steep canyon that separates the viewpoint from the arch. (This is not the popular trail to Delicate Arch, which starts at the Wolfe Ranch parking area. See below.)

Desert Nature Trail

0.2 mi (0.3 km) round trip

15-30 min

Discover the adaptations of plants and animals in the desert on a self-guided nature walk. Trail guide available at the trailhead near the Visitor Center.

Double Arch

0.5 mi (0.8 km) round trip

15-30 min

A relatively flat, sandy trail leads to the base of two giant arch spans which are joined at one end.

Landscape Arch

2 mi (3.2 km) round trip

30-60 min

A relatively flat, gravel-surfaced trail leads to a spectacular ribbon of rock, whose span is more than a football field in length. Short side trips to Tunnel and Pine Tree Arches.

Sand Dune Arch

0.4 mi (0.6 km) round trip

15-30 min

Trail leads through deep sand to a secluded arch among sandstone fins. Kids love the sand!

Skyline Arch

0.4 mi (0.6 km) round trip

10-20 min

A short hike on a flat, well-defined trail.

The Windows

1 mi (1.6 km) round trip

30-60 min

A gentle climb up a gravel loop trail leads to three massive arches (North and South Windows and Turret Arch). An alternate return, slightly longer, is by way of the primitive loop around the back of the two Windows. The primitive loop trail starts at the South Window viewpoint.

Moderate Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Park Avenue

1 mi (1.6 km) one way

30-60 min

From Park Avenue parking area, the trail descends steeply into a spectacular canyon and continues down the wash to the Courthouse Towers parking area. If you have a shuttle driver, you can begin at one parking area and be picked up at the other. For round-trip hiking, retrace your steps along the trail.

Tower Arch

3.4 mi (5.6 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

The trail climbs a steep, but short, rock wall, then cuts across a valley and then meanders through sandstone fins and sand dunes. An alternate, shorter trail (0.3 mile [0.4 km] one way), begins at the end of the four-wheel-drive road on the west side of Tower Arch. This unpaved road washes out quickly in rainstorms; inquire at the visitor center about road conditions before heading out.

Difficult Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Devils Garden Primitive Loop

7.2 mi (11.5 km) round trip

3-5 hrs

Longest of the maintained trails in the park, the Devils Garden Trail leads to eight awe-inspiring arches. Expect narrow ledges with rocky surface hiking and scrambling on slickrock. Not recommended when rock is wet or snowy.

Double O Arch

4 mi (6.4 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

Beyond Landscape Arch, the trail becomes more challenging as it climbs over sandstone slabs; footing is rocky; there are narrow ledges with exposure to heights. Spur trails lead to Partition and Navajo Arches. Dark Angel is one-half mile (0.8 km) farther. Trail guide available at trailhead.

Delicate Arch

3 mi (4.8 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

Take at least 1 quart (1 liter) of water per person! There is no shade. Open slickrock with some exposure to heights. The first half-mile is a wide, well-defined trail. Upon reaching the slickrock, follow the rock cairns. The trail climbs gradually and levels out toward the top of this rock face. Just before you get to Delicate Arch, the trail goes along a rock ledge for about 200 yards. Elevation change: 480 feet (146 meters)

Electronic Bicycles (e-bikes)

On August 30, 2019 the National Park Service announced a new electric bicycle (e-bike) policy for national parks, expanding recreational opportunities and accessibility. The policy supports Secretary’s Order 3376, signed by U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt on August 29, 2019, that directs Department of the Interior (DOI) bureaus to create a clear and consistent e-bike policy on all federal lands managed by the Department.

Beginning October 1, 2019, visitors to Southeast Utah Group parks (Arches and Canyonlands national parks and Hovenweep and Natural Bridges national monuments) will be allowed to use e-bikes where traditional bicycles are allowed. Bicycles and e-bikes are allowed on paved and unpaved roads that are open to the public. Bicycles and e-bikes are not allowed on any trails in the parks.

There are no charging stations in the parks. Generators are not allowed in the backcountry. This change in e-bike policy applies to private and commercial use in the parks.

The National Park Service announcement and the agency’s new e-bike policy are available online at www.nps.gov/orgs/1207/ebikepolicy.htm.

Commercial Tours

The following Moab companies offer commercial tours in Arches National Park:

Business

Phone

Type of Tour

Adrift Adventures

435-259-8594

Van/bus tours departing 3 times per day, full & half day backcountry 4×4 tours

Canyonlands Field Institute

800-860-5262

Sunset tour with short hikes

Deep Desert Expeditions

435-259-1565

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Desert Highlights

435-259-4433

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Dreamride

435-259-6419

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Hike Moab

208-290-4781

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Moab Adventure Center

888-622-4097

Arches bus tours

Navtec Expeditions

800-833-1278

Front and back country tours available

Plateau Restoration

435-259-7733

Van tour with optional hikes

Red Rock Express

800-259-2869

Front country scenic tours

Tom Till Tours

435-259-5327

Photography tours in Arches and Canyonlands

Windgate Adventures

435-260-9802

Photography tours in Arches and Canyonlands

Photography

Arches National Park is a paradise for photographers. Under conditions of constantly changing light, the red rock landscape provides limitless photographic opportunities. Often, the difference between an average photograph and an exceptional photograph is good lighting. Low sun angles at sunrise and sunset can add brilliant color to the red rock. Scattered clouds can also add depth to an image and a passing storm can provide extremely dramatic lighting.
Canyonlands Photography Canyonlands Photography
Canyonlands Photography Canyonlands Photography

Photographing Delicate Arch

Over one million people visit Arches National Park every year, and just about everyone wants to see all of the major views within the park. One of the most heavily visited arches is Delicate Arch. As a result of its popularity, you should always expect to see people surrounding this world famous arch. Although it may occasionally happen, it is unrealistic to expect a solitary experience around Delicate Arch. Be courteous to other visitors during your visit to the arch, and do not expect people to move away from this world famous landmark during your photographs. Remember that not everyone who visits this arch is a photographer. Most people simply want to experience the joy of standing next to such a beautiful landmark. People can add scale to any photo of Delicate Arch, so make your visit a great shared experience for everyone involved. Delicate Arch Photographers

Try not to limit your creativity by simply capturing images of iconic places using the same composition as countless photographers before you. Arches National Park contains thousands of arches and vast expanses of breathtaking scenery just waiting for you to introduce your own personal style and interpretation. For those seeking solitude, Arches has much to offer beyond its iconic places. For example, consider a hike to Double O Arch, returning via the Primitive Trail, for some of the most spectacular scenery in the park. Just remember to bring enough memory cards to capture all of the great views!

Best Times / Locations to Photograph

Early Morning Late Afternoon
Moab Fault Park Avenue
The Three Gossips Courthouse Towers
Sheep Rock Petrified Dunes
The Great Wall Balanced Rock
Turret Arch The Garden of Eden
The Spectacles North and South Windows
Double Arch Delicate Arch (at end of main trail)
Cache Valley Fiery Furnace
Wolfe Ranch Skyline Arch
Landscape Arch Fins in Devil Garden
Double O Arch Tower Arch
Fiery Furnace in Arches National Park


Kid Fun in Canyonlands National Park

Kid Friendly Hiking

Both Island in the Sky and the Needles have several short trails great for children. At the Island, kids enjoy peeking through Mesa Arch and climbing the back of the whale at Whale Roc.

Island in the Sky District

Mesa Arch

Length: 0.5mi / 0.8km round trip

Whale Rock Trail

Length: 1 mile round trip

Difficulty: Easy

Whale Rock 1.0mi / 1.5km 1hour 100ft / 30m Bare Slickrock – Good views.

Whale Rock is a rounded, eroded sandstone fin that is fun to climb. Handrails are provided to help people reach the top, where you are rewarded with impressive views out over Upheaval Dome.

Trailhead
The trailhead is located near the end of the Upheaval Dome Road, in the Island in the Ski District of Canyonlands National Park. From the trailhead you can see the rock, which does somewhat resemble a beached whale.

Base of Whale Rock
Follow the wide, sandy trail to the eastern edge of Whale Rock. From there you will see the recommended route up the rock, using the handrails. You’ll also see that people have walked along the base of the rock, looking for spots where they can climb to the top.

Viewpoint on Rock
The rock is rounded, but it is easy to walk along the top. The best views are found about half-way along the rock, but you can continue along the top to the western edge. When you are ready to return, just retrace your steps back to the trailhead.

Upheaval Dome Overlook

Length: 1.6 mile round-trip, Elevation gain: 50ft / 15m

Time: 30 minutes round trip

Difficulty: Easy

Description: Upheaval Dome is a geographic oddity, an anticline where rocks have been pushed up and then eroded to produce interesting strata. Surrounding the dome is a downwarp in the rock layers, a feature called a syncline. The overlook provides a spectacular view of these interesting features.

Trailhead
The trailhead is located at the end of the Upheaval Dome Road, in the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park. The trail is wide and easy to follow.

First Overlook
It is an easy 0.3 mile hike to a vista overlooking the dome. The views are impressive, but an even better view can be had by following the trail along the rim to a Second Overlook.

Second Overlook
The second overlook is about 0.5 miles farther along the rim. From either viewpoint, just hike back the way you came to your vehicle at the trailhead parking area.

Needles District

Cave Spring

Length: 0.6 miles round trip

Difficulty: Easy

Description: This short, easy hike provides great scenery plus glimpses into the past, as you view a historic cowboy camp and also prehistoric Native American rock art. The trail is wide and easy, but you do have to climb 2 wooden ladders placed to make it easy to get up cliffs.

Trailhead
This hike is in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. To find the trailhead follow the main road (Route 211) into the Needles area. As you enter the park, just past the visitors center, the road forks. Stay left and follow the signs to the trailhead.

In the early 1900s, this area was a popular range for sheep and cattle. A large camp was established here, next to a reliable spring, to accommodate the cowboys. Cooking and most activities were performed outside and many relics remain, including Dutch ovens, fry pans, tables and other implements. The camp is set against a rock, which alcoves where cowboys slept. The spring bubbles from the ground in the last alcove. Ancient pictographs can be seen on a blackened wall in this alcove.

Hiking Loop
If you hike in a clockwise direction, the cowboy camp is just a few hundred feet from the trailhead. From the camp, you can continue a loop hike back to the trailhead. Wooden ladders allow easy access to the slickrock above the camp. From there you will have extraordinary views out over the surrounding countryside.

Pothole Point Trail

Length: 0.6 miles round trip

Difficulty: Easy

Pothole Point is another popular hike, especially if the potholes are full of water and the creatures that live in these small ecosystems.

Description: This trail loops around an area of slickrock where there are numerous potholes. These basins in the sandstone retain water after storms. The trail offers great views of The Needles in the distance. Incredible photos can be taken with the canyonlands scenery reflected off the glassy surface of water in the potholes.

Trailhead
The trailhead is located along the Big Spring Overlook road in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park, near the end of the road. Visitors can hike along the established trail, or just poke around the slickrock. The official hike is short and easy, but you may want to wander a bit and play on the rock.

CAUTION: You do need to be attentive when hiking with kids in Canyonlands as there are unfenced overlooks throughout the park.

Junior Ranger Program

There are a few ways to earn a Junior Ranger badge at Canyonlands. Free Junior Ranger booklets are available at park visitor centers. Filled with fun activities, these books reveal the wonders of Canyonlands to kids and parents alike. After completing certain exercises, participants earn a Junior Ranger badge and signed certificate. Activities are designed for ages 5 and up.

At the Island in the Sky, you may also earn a badge for attending a Family Program (in season) or completing three activities from the Explorer Pack

Family Programs

At the Island in the Sky, everyone in the family can get involved with fun, hands-on activities about nature. Kids who participate can earn a sticker or work toward a Junior Ranger badge. Activities are offered daily from June through August; check at the Visitor Center for a schedule.

Explorer Packs

Both the Island in the Sky and Needles districts offer a unique tool for kids eager to explore and learn about the area: Explorer Packs. These packs contain many useful items, including binoculars, a hand lens, a naturalist guide and a notebook. Before you set out for the day, stop by the visitor center and check one out (deposit required).


Dead Horse Point State Park

The view from Dead Horse Point is one of the most photographed scenic vistas in the world.

Introduction

32 miles (51.5 km) from Moab, Dead Horse Point State Park is one of Utah’s most spectacular state parks. The view from Dead Horse Point is one of the most photographed scenic vistas in the world. Towering 2,000 feet above the Colorado River, the overlook provides a breathtaking panorama of Canyonlands’ sculpted pinnacles and buttes. Millions of years of geologic activity created the spectacular views from Dead Horse Point State Park. Deposition of sediments by ancient oceans, freshwater lakes, streams and wind blown sand dunes created the rock layers of canyon country. Igneous activity formed the high mountains that rise like cool blue islands from the desert below.

The legend of Dead Horse Point states that in the late 1800’s the point was used as a corral for wild mustangs roaming the mesa top. Cowboys herded them across the narrow neck of land and onto the point. The neck was then fenced off with branches and brush. One time, for some unknown reason, horses were left corralled on the waterless point where they died of thirst within view of the Colorado River 2,000 feet below.

There are miles of pet-friendly developed hiking trails in the park, including a paved trail which provides easy access to some of the most scenic views. Mountain Bikers will love the new Intrepid Trail System at Dead Horse Point. With slickrock sections, looping singletrack, sandy washes, and incredible scenery, the Intrepid Trail System provides a great taste of what Moab mountain biking is all about. This is the perfect ride for families and offers spectacular views of the Colorado River and Canyonlands National Park.

Thank you for wearing a face covering in Moab.
Face coverings that completely cover the nose and mouth are now mandatory in Moab. They must be worn in public areas including indoor or outdoor space open to the public where consistent social distancing of at least 6 feet is not possible, reasonable or prudent. Free masks are available at the Moab Information Center, on the corner of Main and Center Streets, and at the national parks.

Distance from Moab
32 Miles (51.5 km)
Directions from Moab
Drive 9 miles (14.5 km) northwest of Moab on US 191 and then 23 miles (37 km) southwest on Utah 313. Driving time to the visitor center from Moab is roughly 45 minutes.
Park Hours
6:00 am – 10:00 pm
Fees
Day Use fees (valid for 3 consecutive days starting from the date of purchase):
  • $20 per vehicle (up to 8 passengers)
  • $15 for Utah Seniors (Utah residents 62 or over)
  • $10 per motorcycle
  • $4 pedestrian or cyclist (biking into park)
  • Commercial day-use fee: $4 per person
Visitor Center and Hours
The visitor center is open year-round, 9am-5pm, has facilities for the disabled, an information area, exhibits, rest rooms, water, publications and souvenirs.
(435) 259-2614

Kayenta and Windgate Campgrounds

Nestled within a grove of juniper, the Kayenta Campground at Dead Horse Point State Park offers a peaceful, shaded respite from the surrounding desert. All twenty-one sites offer lighted shade structures, picnic tables, fire rings, and tent pads. All sites are also equipped with RV electrical hookups. Modern restroom facilities are available, and trails lead directly from the campground to various points of interest within the park. 21 sites/4 non-reservable/1 ADA accessible.

New in 2018, the Wingate Campground sits atop the mesa with far reaching views to the area’s mountain ranges and deep canyons. This campground contains thirty-one (31) campsites, twenty (20) of which have electrical hookups that support RV or tent campers while eleven (11) are walk-in, tent only sites. All sites have fire-pits, picnic tables under shade shelters, and access to bathrooms with running water and dish washing sinks. RV sites will accommodate vehicles up to 56′ and there is a dump station at the entrance to the campground. To make a camping reservation contact Reserve America at 1-800-322-3770, or visit reserveamerica.com.

Yurts

The nine yurts at Dead Horse Point State Park provide the most luxurious accommodations that can be found atop the mesa. A perfect location for experiencing sunrise and sunset, the yurts enjoy sweeping views of both the canyons to the south and the La Sal mountains to the east. A private spur of the Intrepid Trail System gives easy access to the otherwise remote Big Chief and Pyramid Canyon overlooks. Each yurt contains sleeping space for up to six people, in the form of bunked double beds and a pullout futon couch. An outdoor propane grill allows for cooking on site, with the park providing propane free of charge. Heat, air conditioning, and electrical outlets are available, and comfortable seating areas both indoors and outdoors provide for a relaxing environment in any weather condition. Modern restroom facilities are located within easy walking distance.

Please note that pets are not allowed in the yurts, or in vehicles outside of the yurts. If you would like to spend the night in the park with your furry friend, consider the Kayenta Campground.

To make a camping reservation contact Reserve America at 1-800-322-3770, or visit reserveamerica.com.

Camping Fees

  • Kayenta and Windgate campgrounds are $40 per night (RV Campsites) and $35 (Hike-in Only Campsites at Windgate). Maximum of 8 people per site.
  • Yurts: $140 per night year round, maximum of 6 people per site
  • Camping and yurt fees accommodate one vehicle. Extra vehicles are charged a $15 fee.
  • Reservations can be made four months in advance by calling 1-800-322-3770 or online at reserveamerica.com. First-come, first-served openings may be available at the park.
  • There are no water hookups for RV’s. Fill up your RVs in Moab.

Park Highlights

Pet Friendly Hiking Trails

Pet Friendly Hiking Trails

Eight miles of pet friendly hiking trails in the park include two joining loops around the rim and several spurs to beautiful viewpoints.

Mountain Biking

Mountain Biking

The Intrepid Trail System has three hiking and biking loops ranging from one to nine miles with varying degrees of difficulty.

Yurts

Yurts

Nine yurts are available for overnight use and are available by reservation. Open year-round.

Experience Dead Horse Point

Experience Dead Horse Point

Dead Horse Point’s combination of breathtaking scenery and easy accessibility has made it a must-see for visitors to the Moab area.

Night Skies

Dead Horse Point State Park, recognized as an International Dark Sky Park in 2016, is one of the most active and accessible areas to stargaze in the Moab area. Its high plateau location, mountains far in the distance and cities out of sight yields a nearly full view of celestial sphere. Park staff routinely provide programs celebrating the night sky, from walks under the full moon to gazing through telescopes at objects millions of light years away. Whether you want to enjoy by yourself or join a ranger, Dead Horse Point State Park is a premier spot to see the skies our ancestors wondered over and survived with.

Download Dead Horse Point State Park’s Dark Sky Brochure to learn more.

Biological Soil Crust

Help to keep all of our trails open. Protect this fragile, but crucial, soil by remaining on designated roads, routes and trails at all times.

Biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, is the foundation of desert plant life. This black, knobby crust is made up of many different living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the desert ecosystem. However, this sensitive soil is extremely fragile and can take decades to grow. Even a footstep can damage the crust for decades, having lasting impacts on the desert environment. Please stay on the trials. Help to protect this fragile life by remaining on designated roads, routes, and trails at all times. Where hiking trails are not established, hike in sandy washes or on bare rock.

Mountain Biking the Intrepid Trail

Overview
Deadhorse Point State Park, 32 miles west of Moab

Difficulty
Easy to Moderate

Length
Big Chief: 3.6 miles
Crossroads: 1.7 miles
Great Pyramid: 2.2 miles
Intrepid: 0.5 miles
Prickly Pair: 3.0 miles
Raven Roll: 1.7 miles
Twisted Tree: 1.5 miles
Whiptail: 2.6 miles

Elevation @ Trailhead
5900’

Season
Ideal in spring, fall and winter; midday heat in July and August

Directions
Nine miles northwest of Moab on US 191 and then 23 miles southwest on Utah 313 to the end of the highway.

Trail Description

With slickrock sections, looping singletrack, sandy washes, and incredible scenery, the Intrepid Trail System provides a great taste of what Moab mountain biking is all about. This is the perfect ride for families and offers spectacular views of the Colorado River and Canyonlands National Park.

The Intrepid Trail System has 8 segments totaling just over 16 miles of trail for mountain bikers and hikers to enjoy varying through degrees of intermediate difficulty. The eastern section of the trail is easier and often recommended for beginning riders in the Moab area, while the western loop is more challenging. The entirety of the system will offer opportunities for visitors of all ages and abilities, and provide breathtaking views. Unlike the hiking trails, pets are not welcome on the Intrepid Trail System for human, animal and environmental safety.

The Intrepid Trail was made possible through great public/private partnerships. Intrepid Potash, Inc., for which the trail is named, gave $20,000 for construction of a new single-track, non-motorized trail system. The trail was built by Trail Mix, a local volunteer organization, and volunteers from the Utah Conservation Corps, American Conservation Experience and Moab Trails Alliance. The National Park Service and Utah State Parks also worked on the project. Dead Horse Point State Park is located approximately 30 miles from Moab. The park also offers camping and day-use facilities, visitor center, and naturalist programs. For more information call (435) 259-2614.






Canyonlands National Park

The largest national park in Utah, with diversity that staggers the imagination.

Introduction

Canyonlands is the largest national park in Utah, and its diversity staggers the imagination. The easiest way to see the park is with a visit to the Island in the Sky district, only 32 miles (51.5 km) from Moab. The Island in the Sky offers many pullouts with spectacular views along the paved scenic drive. Hiking trails and four-wheel-drive roads access backcountry areas for day or overnight trips.

The Island in the Sky sits atop a massive 1500 foot mesa, quite literally an Island in the Sky. Twenty miles (32.2 km) of paved roads lead to many of the most spectacular views in Canyon Country. From these lofty viewpoints visitors can often see over 100 miles (161 km) in any given direction, resulting in panoramic views that encompass thousands of square miles of canyon country. Take a short day-hike or spend a relaxing late afternoon enjoying the sunset. Whether you have a few hours to spend or a few days, the Island in the Sky provides an unforgettable Canyon Country experience for the entire family.

Thank you for wearing a face covering in Moab.
Face coverings that completely cover the nose and mouth are now mandatory in Moab. They must be worn in public areas including indoor or outdoor space open to the public where consistent social distancing of at least 6 feet is not possible, reasonable or prudent. Free masks are available at the Moab Information Center, on the corner of Main and Center Streets, and at the national parks.

Distance from Moab
32 miles (51.5km)
Directions from Moab
Take Highway 191 10 miles (16 km) north to Highway 313, and then drive southwest 22 miles (35 km). Driving time to the visitor center from Moab is roughly 40 minutes.
Park Hours
Canyonlands National Park is normally open year-round, 24 hours a day.
Entrance Fee
$30/vehicle – Good for 7 days (Subject to change.) Note: Fee collections are suspended until June 15, 2020.
Visitor Center & Hours

Inside temporarily closed. Visitor services available outside building.

Canyonlands is open year-round, 24 hours a day, however the park visitor centers close for the winter. Call (435) 719-2313 for park information.

MAP

PARK WEBCAM

Camping

Scheduled to open July 1, 2020.

Island in the Sky Campground (Willow Flat) has 12 sites, first-come, first-served. The campground is open year-round. The spectacular Green River Overlook is nearby. Nightly camping fee is $15 per site. Sites fill quickly spring through fall. There are toilets, picnic tables, and fire rings in the campground. There are no hookups for RVs and no water at the campground. You can get drinking water outside the visitor center spring through fall.

In addition to the campground located within the park, there is a great selection of additional campgrounds in the surrounding area. Moab has many commercial campgrounds with RV hookups in addition to a huge assortment of BLM public campgrounds in extremely scenic locations. Click here for a complete list of all the camping options available in the Moab area.

Suggested Activities

A Few Hours
Drive the park’s 20 miles (32.2 km) of paved roads and enjoy the spectacular views. Sunrise and sunset are particularly beautiful times of day to enjoy these lofty panoramic views of canyon country.
1/2 Day
Drive the paved scenic drive and hike some of the shorter trails, such as the Mesa Arch or Upheaval Dome Trails. A recent theory suggests that Upheaval Dome was created by a meteor impact.
Full Day
Drive the paved scenic drive and hike some of the longer trails in the park, such as the 5 mile (8 km) round trip Neck Spring Trail. Those with high clearance/4WD vehicles can drive down the Shafer Trail to the White Rim and explore Musselman Arch, or drive all the way down to the Colorado River via Lathrop Canyon. Note that a Day Use Permit is required.
Several Days
Backpackers can experience the solitude of Canyonlands by hiking some of the trails from the mesa top to the White Rim (steep & strenuous) and spend the night in the backcountry. 4-wheel drive enthusiasts or mountain bikers may want to travel the 100 mile “White Rim Trail” which loops below the Island in the Sky mesa. Reservations for White Rim campsites and a Backcountry Permit is required.

Food

Please note that food is not available within the park. The closest restaurants are either in the town of Moab, at Dead Horse Point State Park, or at the dinosaur museum at the intersection of Highways 191 and 313 (entrance fee is not required to access the restaurant).

Park Highlights

Green River Overlook

Green River Overlook

The Green River meanders beneath the Island in the Sky, as seen from the Green River Overlook. A paved walkway leads right up to the overlook.

Mesa Arch

Mesa Arch

A great hike for families with small children, the .5 mi (.8 km) round trip hike to Mesa Arch rewards visitors with a naturally framed view of canyon country.

Shafer Trail

Shafer Trail

The Shafer Trail descends from the Island in the Sky to the White Rim. A high clearance vehicle is strongly recommended. For current conditions check at the visitor center or call 435-259-4351.

Cataract Canyon

Cataract Canyon

Located in Canyonlands National Park, Cataract Canyon contains fourteen miles of rapids ranging in difficulty up to Class V.

Spring Wildflowers

Spring Wildflowers

Indian Paintbrush are just one of the many wildflowers that populate the Island in the Sky in the Spring (April-June).

Night Sky

Night Sky

Canyonlands National Park, which contains some of the darkest night skies in North America, is a popular destination for stargazers. Click here for the latest sunrise/sunset and moon phase information for Moab.

Biking

Biking

Canyonlands is famous for its mountain biking terrain, particularly for the 100-mile White Rim Road at the Island in the Sky. The Maze also offers some multi-day trip possibilities, though the logistics and roads are more difficult (for the support vehicles, not the bikes).

The Rivers

The Rivers

The Colorado and Green rivers wind through the heart of Canyonlands, cutting through layered sandstone to form two deep canyons. Both rivers are calm upstream of the Confluence, ideal for canoes, kayaks and other shallow water craft. Below the Confluence, the combined flow of both rivers spills down Cataract Canyon with remarkable speed and power, creating a world-class stretch of white water.

Biological Soil Crust

Help to keep all of our trails open. Protect this fragile, but crucial, soil by remaining on designated roads, routes and trails at all times.

Biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, is the foundation of desert plant life. This black, knobby crust is made up of many different living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the desert ecosystem. However, this sensitive soil is extremely fragile and can take decades to grow. Even a footstep can damage the crust for decades, having lasting impacts on the desert environment. Please stay on the trials. Help to protect this fragile life by remaining on designated roads, routes, and trails at all times. Where hiking trails are not established, hike in sandy washes or on bare rock.

Hiking

The Island in the Sky offers a wide variety of hiking trails ranging from short 30 minute walks on the mesa top, to overnight expeditions all the way down to the Colorado River.

Trails are marked with cairns (small rock piles). Please do not disturb existing cairns or build new ones. Signs are located at trailheads and intersections. All trails leading below the Mesa Top are primitive and rough; carry and know how to use a topographic map. No potable water is available along any of the hiking trails. During the warmest months always carry at least one gallon of water per person, per day.

Mesa Top – Easy Trails

Trail

Distance

Time

Elev. Change

Mesa Arch

0.5mi / 0.8km

30 minutes

100ft / 30m

Mornings are best – Beautiful Arch on cliff edge.

Murphy Point

1.3mi / 1.9km

1 hour

100ft / 30m

Panoramic view with Henry Mountains.

White Rim Overlook

1.5mi / 2.0km

1 hour

25ft / 8m

View of potholes & White Rim Road.

Grand View Point

2.0mi / 3.0km

1.5 hours

50ft / 15m

Panoramic view along cliff edge.

Mesa Top – Moderate Trails

Trail

Distance

Time

Elev. Change

Neck Spring

5.0mi / 8.0km

3 – 4 hours

300ft / 91m

Springs – Evidence of ranching

Aztec Butte

2.0mi / 3.0km

1.5 hours

225ft / 69m

Steep slickrock to top – Granaries.

Whale Rock

1.0mi / 1.5km

1 hour

100ft / 30m

Bare slickrock – Good views.

Upheaval Dome to Main Overlook

1.0mi / 1.5km

30 minutes

50ft / 15m

View into crater

Upheaval Dome to Second Overlook

2.0mi / 3.0km

45 minutes

200ft / 61m

View of crater & upheaval canyon

Mesa Top to White Rim – Steep & Strenuous Trails

Trail

Distance

Time

Elev. Change

Lathrop to White Rim Road

10mi / 16km

5- 7 hours

1600ft / 488m

Views of Colorado River & La Sal Mountains

Lathrop to Colorado River

17mi / 27km

Overnight

2000ft / 610m

River access – Cottonwoods

Murphy Loop

9mi / 14km

5 – 7 hours

1400ft / 427m

Panoramic view from hogback.

Gooseberry

6mi / 10km

4-6 Hours

1400ft/427m

Views of cliffs & La Sal Mountains.

Wilhite

10mi / 16km

6 – 8 hours

1600ft / 488m

Slot canyon across White Rim Road.

Alcove Spring

10mi / 16km

6 – 7 hours

1300ft / 396m

Large alcove, views of Taylor Canyon.

Syncline Loop

8mi / 13km

5 – 7 hours

1300ft / 396m

Canyon hiking – some shade.

Syncline Loop: Upheaval Crater Spur

3mi / 4km

2 hours

350ft / 107m

Some scrambling over rocks.

Syncline Loop: Upheaval Canyon Spur

6mi / 10km

2 – 3 hours

400ft / 122m

Sandy hike along wash bottom.

Biking

With hundreds of miles of four-wheel-drive roads, Canyonlands offers ideal terrain for multi-night mountain bike trips. Most groups travel with vehicle support to haul water and gear since there are few reliable water sources along these roads. For the truly adventurous, self-supported trips with panniers and trailers are also possible. Bikes must remain on designated roads: there are no single-track trails in the park.

Things to Know

  • Overnight Trips: You must have a permit for all overnight trips.
  • Day Trips: You must have a permit for day trips on White Rim, Elephant Hill, Lavender Canyon, and Peekaboo/Horse Canyon roads.
    Groups must camp in designated sites.
  • Reservations for White Rim campsites are very competitive. You may have to make a reservation up to four months in advance.
  • There are no shoulders or bike lanes. Be aware of passing vehicles.

Where Can I Ride My Bike?

You can ride a bicycle on any public roadway in the park. Some roads are better for cycling than others. Check at visitor centers for recommendations and road conditions.

Paved Roads

You can ride on paved roads at the Island in the Sky. You must must ride single file. There are no road shoulders or bike lanes; please be aware of passing vehicles.

Backcountry Roads

Canyonlands is famous for its mountain biking terrain, particularly for the 100-mile White Rim Road at Island in the Sky. The 100-mile White Rim Road loops around and below the Island in the Sky mesa top and provides expansive views of the surrounding area. Bicycle trips usually take three to four days. Overnight and day-use permits are required.

Do I Need a Permit?

  • Day Use: If you’re taking a day trip on the White Rim, Elephant Hill, Lavender Canyon, or Peekaboo/Horse Canyon roads, you need a day-use permit.
  • Overnight: If you’re going on an overnight trip, you need an overnight permit.

During the spring and fall, demand for permits frequently exceeds the number available. If you plan to visit Canyonlands during peak season, especially to bike and camp along the White Rim Road, we recommend making reservations well in advance. You can reserve overnight permits up to four months in advance of the start of your trip. Day-use permits are available up to 24 hours in advance of your trip.

Mountain bike groups must travel single-file, remain on established roads, and camp in designated sites. There is no single-track riding in the park. We recommend a support vehicle for all multi-day bike trips: there are no water sources along most of the roads. Guided trips are available for many destinations within Canyonlands.

Electronic Bicycles (e-bikes)

On August 30, 2019 the National Park Service announced a new electric bicycle (e-bike) policy for national parks, expanding recreational opportunities and accessibility. The policy supports Secretary’s Order 3376, signed by U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt on August 29, 2019, that directs Department of the Interior (DOI) bureaus to create a clear and consistent e-bike policy on all federal lands managed by the Department.

Beginning October 1, 2019, visitors to Southeast Utah Group parks (Arches and Canyonlands national parks and Hovenweep and Natural Bridges national monuments) will be allowed to use e-bikes where traditional bicycles are allowed. Bicycles and e-bikes are allowed on paved and unpaved roads that are open to the public. Bicycles and e-bikes are not allowed on any trails in the parks.

There are no charging stations in the parks. Generators are not allowed in the backcountry. This change in e-bike policy applies to private and commercial use in the parks.

The National Park Service announcement and the agency’s new e-bike policy are available online at www.nps.gov/orgs/1207/ebikepolicy.htm.

Photography

Canyonlands is a paradise for photographers. Under conditions of constantly changing light, the varicolored landscape provides limitless photographic opportunities. Often, the difference between an average photograph and an exceptional photograph is good lighting. Low sun angles at sunrise and sunset can add brilliant color to the rock. Scattered clouds can also add depth to an image and a passing storm can provide extremely dramatic lighting.


Arches National Park

Scenic Byway U-313

Dead Horse Mesa Scenic Byway

History

U-313 is a 22.5 mile (36.2 km) long State highway that winds its way through Grand and San Juan Counties. The highway is the access road for Canyonlands National Park and Dead Horse Point State Park.  U-313 was first built in 1975 in place of U-278.  

Construction crew severely damaged the U-313 while constructing the road into what is now Canyonlands National Park. In 1988 the route was rebuilt from its original state of steep grades and blind switchbacks to its current state. The reconstruction of SR-313 was done at the same time as the access road into Canyonlands National Park.

U-313 is currently called the Dead Horse Mesa Scenic Byway.  This Scenic byway leads you to one of the most photographed landscapes in the world.  Dead Horse Point makes you feel as if you are on top of the world, with some of the most amazing 360-degree views.  

At the highest viewpoint on a clear day, the La Sal Mountains can be viewed to the east, the Abajo Mountains to the South, The Henry Mountains to the west and the Bookcliffs to the north. 

Dead Horse Mesa Scenic Byway U-313

0.0 MILES (0.0 KM) – Beginning of Scenic Byway and Movie Location

The intersection of SR-313 and Hwy 191: mile marker 136.8 on US 191 and 11 miles (17.7 km) north of downtown Moab, Utah, 20 miles – 32.2 km (south of Exit 180 on I-70. This is the beginning of your journey to what seems to be the ends of the earth.

Before starting your journey you may want to travel .3 miles (.5 km) north on Highway 191 to fill your tank at the gas station located there.  This station was one of the iconic movie locations in the 1997 movie Breakdown, starring Kurt Russell and Kathleen Quinlan. The plot is basically about a man searching for his missing wife after his car breaks down in the middle of the desert.

Breakdown, with Kurt Russell
Kurt Russell gasses up his vehicle near the intersection of US-191 & U-313 in Breakdown.

Note: Don’t worry folks, reliable car service is just a phone call away in Moab.

Proceed back to the beginning of U-313 and set your trip odometer to 0.

0.01 MILES ( .02 KM)- Entrance to Moab Giants Dinosaur Park

This attraction has life size dinosaurs that walk the ground that they used to call home. https://moabgiants.com/

Moab Giants Dinosaur Park is the first of its kind world-wide. The perfect balance of adventure and science, Moab Giants has been the realization of a dream for both dinosaur park enthusiasts, and world renowned scientists. They have special expertise in the field of fossil footprints and a deep knowledge of the paleontology of the region. 

Moab Giants Dinosaur Museum
5D Paleo-Aquarium

Moab Giants

Not only is the park set among some of the world’s most breathtaking scenery, it is also a unique experience for all ages. Start your journey through time with a 3D cinema introducing you into the prehistoric world, and then venture outside and make your own tracks alongside over 100 state-of the art life-size dinosaurs. You will be roaming the extraordinary landscape dinosaurs once called home, as evidenced by the huge concentration of fossilized tracks found all around the area. The Tracks Museum is full of entertainment with interactive learning touch screens, games to play, and visually stunning exhibits that not only fascinate, but educate. The 5D Paleo-Aquarium gives you a realistic view into ancient life under the sea. Your time in the aquarium will end in the 5D room with an earth shattering experience you are sure not to forget!

Note: The Giant’s Cafe serves up a great selection of food items, and entrance into the park is not required.  Stop in for lunch before starting your journey.

0.6 MILES  (1 KM) – Cliffline Viewpoint & Information Kiosks

This roadside parking area contains information about Canyonlands National Park and Dead Horse Point State Park, along with information on travel and camping rules for the area.  In addition to great views of the area’s geology, abandoned uranium mining activity is visible to the north on the cliffside. 

2.3 MILES (3.7 KM) – Seven Mile Canyon (South Fork)

On the left is a parking area through a gate. This canyon is closed to vehicle traffic about 2.2 miles (3.5 km) up but is open to horseback riders and hikers. Follow the wash up the main canyon. Along the main canyon walls, you may catch a glimpse of a few petroglyphs (these are tricky to find so keep an eye out).  The canyon ends at a grotto that usually has water in a small pond (this is not for human consumption). 7.2 miles (11.6 km) round trip. 

2.7 MILES (4.3 KM) – Rock Art

Intestine Man Pictograph

On the right side of the road is a pictograph panel called the Intestine Man, along with other petroglyphs.  The Intestine Man is named for a Barrier Canyon style pictograph that appears to show the intestines within an anthropomorphic image. Nearby this unique panel of pictographs are some interesting petroglyphs that contain 3 images of bighorn sheep with oversized rectangular bodies.

Continue up SR-313 to the top of switchbacks to find a vast landscape of pinyon pines, grassy meadows and red rock buttes. 

4.5 MILES (7.2 KM) – Monitor and Merrimac Viewpoint 

Monitor and Merrimac Buttes

These two buttes were named for their resemblance to the Monitor and The Merrimack, two American Civil War steamships. Although Merrimac, the larger of the two buttes, looks large it is actually very thin at  200-600 feet wide and 1,600 feet long.

Monitor & Merrimack Buttes

5.3 MILES (8.5 KM) – Navajo Rock East Parking Area

This parking area will give you access to a network of Mountain Biking trails. Navajo Rocks Chaco loop you can also access 7 up, Mag 7, and many other trails.

6.2 MILES – (10.0 KM) Big Mesa View Area 

Views of the surrounding cliffs, along with the Monitor and Merrimac Buttes.  This viewpoint is great for wildflowers in the spring.

7.3 MILES (11.7 KM) – Main Navajo Rocks Parking Area

This parking area is a great place to get some mountain biking, hiking and even four wheeling in. This parking area will give you access to some scenic easy four wheeling. This trailhead can take you up to a dramatic outcropping called determination towers. This is about an 8.8 mile up and back easy going scenic safari ride. 

You can also access Monitor and Merrimac, Seven Mile Rim Safari Trail. Wipeout Hill Safari Trail.

8.4 MILES (13.5 KM) – Plateau Viewpoint

Plateau Viewpoint

The roadside viewpoint has great views of the La Sal Mountains and the surrounding plateau country.  The La Sal Mountains are part of the Manti-La Sal National Forest and the southern Rocky Mountains. The maximum elevation is at Mount Peale, reaching 12,721 feet (3,877 m) above sea level. The range contains three clusters of peaks separated by passes. The peaks span a distance of about 10 miles (16 km). The name of the range dates to Spanish times, when the Sierra La Sal (meaning the "Salt Mountains") were a prominent landmark on the Old Spanish Trail between Santa Fe and Los Angeles.

8.5 MILES (13.7 KM) – Dubinky Well Road

  • Lone Mesa Group Campsites – Lone Mesa Group Sites are ideal for large gatherings such as school groups or family reunions. Read more…

Continuing down Dubinky Well Road leads to many four-wheel drive roads that lead to canyons and vistas including:

  • Hey Joe Trail, a site of some mining ruins, is a short tributary to Labyrinth Canyon of the Green River. 10 miles of good dirt road to the rim of Spring Canyon, where a spectacular ledge road winds down a 600-foot cliff to the canyon bottom. The trail follows the canyon about 2 miles to the Green River. It then turns upstream about 9 miles along the river to reach Hey Joe Canyon. The trail along the river is subject to rock falls from above and collapse from below.  4WD Required – Difficulty 4/10. Trail Details
  • 3D Trail tours the vicinity of colorful Hidden Canyon and Brink Spring, northwest of Moab. It visits the canyon bottom and canyon rim, and, finally, a higher overlook of the area (hence the name 3-D). A few of the hills have been known to challenge stock vehicles, but most of the tour is pleasant, scenic, family four-wheeling. 4WD Required – Difficulty 4/10. Trail Details
  • Secret Spire Trail rides the rolling mesa top between two of the Green River’s large tributary canyons, Hellroaring and Spring Canyons. It goes close to the deep portions of Spring Canyon, and it crosses the shallower upper Spring Canyon to visit a strange tower, dubbed the Secret Spire. It is a good trail for some mild four-wheeling through an interesting and scenic expanse of country. 4WD Required – Difficulty 3/10. Trail Details

9.7 MILES (15.6 KM) – Jewel Tibbetts Arch Trail

Turn right on an unimproved dirt road and continue to a parking lot in 1.3 miles (2.1 km). A high clearance vehicle may be required based on conditions. This trail offers spectacular views across Hell Roaring Canyon to a large natural arch. From the parking lot, the trail passes through a fence and follows a dirt road for about 0.1 miles (.16 km). The trail leaves the road and goes down several dry washes until it rejoins an old road (closed to vehicles). After a short distance, the trail leaves the old road, and follows a series of rock cairns near the edge of Hell Roaring Canyon (400 feet deep).

Jewel Tibbetts Arch Trail
View of Hell Roaring Canyon on the trail to Jewel Tibbetts Arch

After a short distance, the trail follows a short spur onto a slickrock platform, from which spectacular views of the arch and the canyon below can be had. The trail returns to the parking lot across a blackbrush mesa, where it rejoins the road. The arch is named after Jewel Tibbetts, a Moab resident who lived about 10 miles’ (16.1 km) distance at the Horsethief Ranch in the 1950 and 1960’s with her husband Bill. They often took ranch visitors to see the arch. Note: Hikers should exercise caution on those sections of the trail which are close to the edge of Hell-Roaring Canyon. The trail can be very warm in summer. Neither mountain bikes nor motorized vehicles are allowed on this trail, except for the first 0.1 miles (.16 km) where the trail follows an existing road. Length of Hike: 2.1 miles (3.4 km), round-trip (semi-loop); allow about 2 hours round-trip. 

11.9 MILES (19.2 KM) – Horse Thief Campground Entrance 

Campsites are tucked in the pygmy pinyon-juniper forest on the mesas above Moab, yet offer great views. Individual sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. One group site, Horsethief Group Site, is available for reservation through Recreation.gov. This campground is close to Canyonlands National Park and Dead Horse Point State Park. 

12.2 MILES (19.6 KM) – Mineral Bottom Rd

Mineral Bottom Road
Mineral Bottom Road

The road is well maintained and is rated as easy. It is about 13 miles (20.9 km) to the switchbacks that lead you down to the White Rim Trail and the Green River.  The steep switchbacks are scenic and easy as you descend about 500′ to the bottom. Although the road is suitable for high-clearance two-wheel-drive vehicles when dry, the unpaved sections of the road can be impassable when wet.  In any case, driving 4WD is recommended due to uneven surface. Once on the bottom, turning right will lead you to a dead end at Mineral Bottom, where rafting boats are launched. If you turn left you are on the White Rim Trail in Canyonlands National Park. (A permit is required for the White Rim: https://www.nps.gov/cany/planyourvisit/dayusepermits.htm)

Mile 13.1  (21.1 KM) – Gemini Bridges Trail 

Gemini Bridges

Gemini Bridges is one of the most popular spots in Moab. The Gemini Bridges Trail is well known to local mountain bike riders for its scenery and long descents. Starting from U-313, the trail is nearly all downhill back to US-191. Approximately 5.5 miles from U-313, the spur route to Gemini Bridges is encountered. This route is a hiking route only and is a short 0.2 mile walk. After viewing the bridges, enjoy the rest of the marked trail down to Highway 191. This bike route utilizes a county road and is shared with jeeps, ATV/UTVs, and dirt bikes.

14.6 MILES  (23.5 KM) – Left Turn to Dead Horse Point State Park


19.1 MILES (30.7 KM) – Entrance Station to Dead Horse Point State Park

Dead Horse Point State Park

From the prominence of Dead Horse Point, 2,000 feet above a gooseneck in the Colorado River, an ever-changing landscape unfurls. Immense vertical cliffs meet with canyons carved by ice, water, and wind creating a visual masterpiece. 

Millions of years of geologic activity created the spectacular views from Dead Horse Point State Park. Deposition of sediments by ancient oceans, freshwater lakes, streams and wind blown sand dunes created the rock layers of canyon country. Igneous activity formed the high mountains that rise like cool blue islands out of the hot, dry desert.

An entrance fee is required.

The Main Overlook at Dead Horse Point

19.5 MILES (31.4) – Moenkopi Yurts

A perfect location for experiencing sunrise, sunset and a bit of seclusion, the Moenkopi Yurts offer a glorious camping experience up at Dead Horse Point State Park.  With sweeping views and a private spur to the Intrepid Trail System this yurt site can be your quiet spot of heaven while enjoying the Moab area. These Yurts can be reserved at https://www.reserveamerica.com/explore/dead-horse-point-state-park/UT/344161/overview

20.2 MILES (32.5 KM) – Grand and San Juan County line


21.1 MILES (34.0 KM) – Visitor Center/ Basin Overlook Parking Lot

A gift shop is located inside the visitor center and offers park visitors a variety of quality souvenirs including shirts, hats, postcards, cups, handmade knives, magnets, art work, pottery, snacks, etc.

The Amitheater at Dead Horse Point

22.1 MILES (35.6 KM) – Bottleneck viewpoint (Historical Marker)

On the road, about a quarter of a mile from the lookout point, you’ll pass the bottleneck which is only about 30 feet wide. Here, once the horses would be herded in, a fence and gate were placed trapping the horses. The cowboys could then pick out the wild horses they wished to keep. Unfortunately, as the story goes, once the cowboys picked the horses they wanted, they opened the gate at the bottleneck and left. It was said that the wild horses were so spooked that many didn’t leave the point, even though the gate was open, and being on top of a mesa, with no shade and no water, they died of thirst.

22.5 MILES (36.2 KM) – Dead Horse Point Overlook Trail

This is the main attraction of Dead Horse Point State Park. From the overlook parking lot, a short paved pathway leads to breathtaking views of the Colorado River and adjacent canyon country some 2,000 feet below. A large shelter at the overlook provides relief from both foul weather and summer heat. Paved pathways lead out in both directions from the shelter, providing additional viewpoints while linking up with both the East and West Rim trail systems.

Although the primary overlook and shade shelter are accessible, the eastern and western spur trails contain steeper inclines and short sections of slick rock interspersed with the pavement.

The opening rock climbing scene features Tom Cruise at Dead Horse Point.
Armie Hammer talks about his favorite Movie location (Moab) and the most spectacular sight he saw (Dead Horse Point).


Arches National Park

Scenic Byway U-128

Every twist and turn holds something new.

This spectacular route along the Colorado River gorge begins at the Colorado River Bridge on the north end of Moab. Spending a day exploring this section of the river gorge will provide you with jaw dropping scenery and take you to the sixth-longest natural rock span in the United States, world famous movie locations, beautiful picnic and bouldering areas, a Film Heritage Museum, a large variety of hiking trails including one that goes to the breathtaking Fisher Towers, historical points of interest, guided horseback riding opportunities, outdoor dining, a brand new mercantile (opening in 2020) and a ghost town.

Utah State Route 128 (U-128) is a 44.6-mile-long (71.7 km) state highway north of Moab. The entire length of the highway has been designated the Upper Colorado River Scenic Byway, as part of the Utah Scenic Byways program. This road also forms part of the Dinosaur Diamond Prehistoric Highway, a National Scenic Byway. Residents of Moab frequently refer to SR-128 as “the river road”, after the Colorado River, which the highway follows.

The highway was originally constructed to connect rural cities in eastern Utah with Grand Junction, Colorado, the largest city in the region. Part of the highway was merged into the Utah state highway system in 1931; the rest was taken over by the state and assigned route number 128 in 1933. Today, the highway is used as a scenic drive for visitors to the area.

The highway crosses the Colorado River at the site of the Dewey Bridge, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This bridge was the longest suspension bridge in Utah until April 2008 when it was destroyed by a fire.

To begin this tour, set your odometer to 0 at the intersection of US-191 and U-128.

0.0 Miles (0.0 Km) – Lions Park/Boulder Park

Moab Lions Park
Moab Boulder Park

This scenic park is located on the banks of the Colorado River just north of Moab on U-128 at the intersection with US 191. It’s a lovely facility with a paved parking area and big shade trees along the riverbank. There’s a footbridge over the Colorado River that connects paved trails that go north-south along US 191 and east-west along U-128 and the river through red rock canyons. Restrooms and picnic areas are available. Facilities are wheelchair-accessible.

Lions Park also contains Moab Boulder Park. Moab is a very, very difficult place to get going when you’re a beginner at climbing, and this park really bridges the gap from beginners to help them get out on the cliffs. Along with three custom-made boulders that were color-matched to blend with Moab’s surrounding red rocks, the park also includes a thick rubber surface beneath the climbing rocks to help cushion the inevitable falls.

Continuing down U-128, the drive parallels the Colorado River within a narrow section of the Colorado River gorge, providing breathtaking views of the surrounding red sandstone cliffs. Popular attractions along this portion of the route include viewpoints of the river, public camping areas, and Grandstaff Canyon, which contains a delightful hiking trail to Morning Glory Natural Bridge.

3.1 Miles (5.1 Km) – Grandstaff Hiking Trail

Grandstaff Canyon was named after William Grandstaff, an African American prospector and rancher who grazed his cattle here during the late 1800s. It is a lovely canyon, cut into the Navajo Sandstone by a small, perennial stream that begins about six miles from the southern shore of the Colorado River. The trail winds along the stream through an oasis of cottonwood and willow trees, cut off from the desert above by towering sandstone cliffs. Like all good hikes, this one also has a reward at the end. Morning Glory Natural Bridge spans the head of one of Grandstaff’s side canyons at the end of the trail. According to Bureau of Land Management statistics, Morning Glory is the sixth largest natural bridge in the United States.

Grandstaff Canyon was named after William Grandstaff, an African American prospector and rancher who grazed his cattle here during the late 1800s. It is a lovely canyon, cut into the Navajo Sandstone by a small, perennial stream that begins about six miles from the southern shore of the Colorado River. The trail winds along the stream through an oasis of cottonwood and willow trees, cut off from the desert above by towering sandstone cliffs. Like all good hikes, this one also has a reward at the end. Morning Glory Natural Bridge spans the head of one of Grandstaff’s side canyons at the end of the trail. According to Bureau of Land Management statistics, Morning Glory is the sixth largest natural bridge in the United States.

Morning Glory Natural Bridge

7.8 Miles (12.6 Km) – Big Bend Bouldering Area

Big Bend Bouldering Area has something for every age and ability. Located right off the highway, literally across the street from the Colorado River, it is hard to find a more scenic location for bouldering. It’s not unusual to have beginners working next to world-class climbers. Bring a comfortable chair and watch the show or work the routes yourself.

At 13 miles (20.9 km) the gorge widens as the highway proceeds past Castle and Professor Valleys, which have been the shooting locations for many western films including Wagon Master and Rio Grande, along with numerous television commercials.

14.2 Miles (22.9 km) – Castle Creek Winery

Castle Creek Winery

Castle Creek Winery is an award-winning winery producing a variety of both white and reds from grapes grown in the Moab region. The winery overlooks the Colorado River’s best white water rapids, at the foot of dramatic red rock cliffs. Castle Creek Winery offers wine tasting Monday – Saturday (closed Sunday and Holidays) during the season. A tasting room is located on the top floor of the winery where you may purchase wine and other memorabilia or take a self-guided tour.

Horseback Riding (Seasonal)

  • Red Cliffs Lodge Horseback Riding (14.2 Miles/22.9 km) – For a truly authentic western experience, nothing beats touring our rugged desert from atop a gentle, cowboy-trained quarter horse. From early settlers to John Wayne himself, people have found there’s no better way to see, smell, and experience the Wild West.
  • Moab Horses at Hauer Ranch (21 Miles/33.8 km) – The ranch offers both horse and mule riding through miles of scenic open range in the most spectacular country you can imagine. Meander along the Colorado River, cross creeks, or visit famous movie sites while enjoying the feel of open range riding. All trips are tailored to your experience level and desired duration.

14.2 Miles (22.9 km) – Moab Museum of Film and Western Heritage

Moab Museum of Film and Western Heritage
Moab Museum of Film and Western Heritage

Red Cliffs Lodge, on the banks of the mighty Colorado River, is home for the Moab Museum of Film & Western Heritage. The lodge is built on the old George White Ranch, a key location for nine of the big Westerns including Rio Grande, Cheyenne Autumn, Ten Who Dared, The Comancheros, and Rio Conchas. The late George White was founder of the Moab to Monument Valley Film Commission, the longest ongoing film commission in the world. In the museum one can learn more about film locations, how the sets are built, and how the filming process is managed on nature’s own sound stage. On display in the museum are production photographs, movie posters, autographed scripts, props from the many pictures filmed in the area, and displays about the western ranching heritage.

Dozens of movies have used the ranch and surrounding area as the set and backdrop for their films. From Disney to Spielberg and from westerns to sci-fi, Moab has been the scenic choice for some of Hollywood’s greatest movies. Red Cliffs has hosted some of its biggest stars; John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara, Rock Hudson, Henry Fonda, Roger Moore, Burt Reynolds, Jason Patrick, Johnny Depp and many, many more.

Westworld has a lot of scenes that were filmed along Highway 128.
Austin Powers’ helicopter, for Goldmember, was shot on Highway 128.

14.2 Miles (22.9 km) – Red Cliffs Outdoor Lunch

During the season, Red Cliffs Lodge offers an outdoor lunch on the banks of the Colorado River. (Open to the public as well as guests.)

15.5 Miles (24.9 km) Castle Valley – Castleton Tower and The Rectory

Castleton Tower is a 400-foot (120 m) Wingate Sandstone tower standing on a 1,000 foot Moenkopi-Chinle cone above the northeastern border of Castle Valley. The Tower is world-renowned as a subject for photography and for its classic rock climbing routes, the most famous of which is the Kor-Ingalls Route featured in the famous guidebook “Fifty Classic Climbs of North America”. In 1964, Chevrolet filmed a commercial for the Impala convertible perched atop the tower.

Adjacent to Castleton Tower is The Rectory, a thin 200 foot (61 m) wide, and 1,000 foot (305 m) long north-to-south butte with 200 ft vertical Wingate Sandstone walls tower standing on a 1,000 foot Moenkopi-Chinle base. The Jon Bon Jovi music video Blaze of Glory was filmed at The Rectory. The Australian band Heaven also filmed their Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door music video on top of The Rectory.

Note: There are great views of these formations from the Sylvester Trail (below).

Castleton Tower

17.3 Miles (27.8 km) – JJ’s Mercantile

Opening to the public in Spring 2020, on the property of Sorrel River Ranch, JJ’s Mercantile will provide everything from gifts, groceries and gear for the guests of the resort, campers, locals and those passing through. Stop by for hot coffee, tantalizing pastries, fresh baked bread, tasty sandwiches and salads artfully prepared from JJ’s open kitchen and ready to go.

18.4 Miles (29.6 km) – Sylvester Trail

From the Professor Valley Ranch Road turn-off on the right, drive 2.2 miles (3.5 km) on a well graded road to the trailhead.

The Sylvester Trail is in the Onion Creek area and follows open desert through the Professor Valley drainage and features beautiful views of the surrounding terrain. The trail is named after Dr. Sylvester Richardson, who with his wife Mary Jane, were among the first settlers in the valley back in the 1880’s. Sylvester’s nickname was ‘Professor’ for which the valley is named.

From the parking area, follow the trail which is relatively flat and easy. The trail will cross a dry wash several times before it begins to ascend a bench on the right. The trail weaves along this bench gradually ascending. The rock formations include the Preacher, The Nuns, Rectory and Castleton Tower. Once the trail passes the foot of Castleton Tower, it will begin to descend slightly.

When you reach a dirt 4×4 road, the Sylvester Trail ends and you return the way you came. 6.9 miles (11.1 km) round-trip. (The trail is shared with equestrian users and there is no shade, so avoid on hot days.)

21.8 Miles (35.1) – Fisher Towers Trail

Fisher Towers Trail

Turn right on the well graded dirt road, then travel 2.2 miles (3.5 km) to the trailhead. The Fisher Towers trail is a world class experience. The views of Castle Rock and the shear sandstone cliffs of the Colorado River are stunning. This is an out and back hike will take you by 3 amazing formations, The Kingfisher, Echo Tower and The Titan. This area is popular with rock climbers so keep an eye up on the rocks. The trail descends into the canyons in several places which brings the overall elevation gain to about 1000 feet. The best picture taking time is probably when the afternoon sun is looking over your shoulder at the towers but alas that is also the most unforgiving time on a hot summer day so be sure to bring plenty of water.

23.3 Miles (37.3) – Amphitheater Loop

Turn left into Hittle Bottom Parking Area – The trail starts across the street and features broad sweeping views and solitude. 2.8 mile loop.

This is a foray into the heart of the Richardson Amphitheater, near the Colorado River, in an area of beautiful rock formations. The Amphitheater Loop Trail is approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) from the Fisher Towers Trailhead and both trails can be walked in a single day. The Amphitheater Loop Trail makes a lovely walk, and climbs approximately 250 feet in elevation to afford a stunning view of the Colorado River corridor. Along the way, you can see interesting sandstone formations in the Moenkopi and Cutler sandstone layers.

24.7 miles (39.8 km) – Fisher Towers Viewpoint

Fishers Towers and La Sal Mountains

The roadside viewpoint on the left provides one of the grandest views in the west, the red rock spires of the Fisher Towers set against the often snow covered peaks of the La Sal Mountains.

30.0 Miles (48.3) – The Site of Historic Dewey Bridge

Dewey Bridge
Historic Dewey Bridge, before it was destroyed by fire in 2008.

Dewey Bridge, built in 1916, originally carried U-128 across the Colorado River. The bridge featured an all wood deck measuring 502 feet (153 m) long, 10.2 feet (3.1 m) wide from support to support and 8 feet (2.4 m) wide from rail to rail. The bridge also consisted of two metal towers, a run of seven cables on each side of the bridge deck, and cable anchors. The bridge was designed to support the weight of six horses, three wagons, and 9,000 pounds (4,100 kg) of freight.

On the day of its completion, it was the second-longest suspension bridge west of the Mississippi River. The longest was the Cameron Suspension Bridge, also built by the Midland Bridge Company, who used the same base plans for both bridges. Dewey Bridge remained the longest suspension bridge in Utah until it was destroyed by fire in 2008. The remains of the bridge and a historical marker remain on the site.

44.0 Miles (70.8) – Cisco Ghost Town

The town started in the 1880s as a saloon and water-refilling station for the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad. As work crews and, later, travelers came through, stores, hotels and restaurants sprang up to accommodate them. Nearby cattle ranchers and sheepherders in the Book Cliffs north of town began using Cisco as a livestock and provisioning center. Around the turn of the 20th century, over 100,000 sheep were sheared at Cisco before being shipped to market. After oil and natural gas were discovered, people began traveling more and Cisco continued to grow. The town’s decline coincided with the demise of the steam locomotive. A declining economy crashed when Interstate 70 was built, bypassing Cisco. After another 5 miles (8 km) the route intersects Interstate 70.


From the National Park Service…

Release date:  March 27, 2020

Contacts:
Lynn Mcaloon, (435) 210-1799
Canyonlands Information Line, (435) 719-2313
Arches Information Line, (435) 719-2299

MOAB, UT— The Southeast Utah Group of national parks is announcing additional modifications to operations in response to guidance from Southeast Utah Public Health, San Juan Public Health, and Moab Regional Hospital. The health and safety of our visitors, employees, volunteers, and partners is our number one priority. The National Park Service (NPS) is working servicewide with federal, state, and local authorities to closely monitor the COVID-19 pandemic.

Effective Saturday, March 28, 2020, Arches and Canyonlands national parks will be closed to all park visitors until further notice. All vehicles, bikes, and pedestrians are prohibited from entering any park areas, including campgrounds, trails, backcountry, and roads. Any recreational use of the parks is in violation of this closure. We regret any inconvenience or hardship this may cause.

The NPS encourages people to take advantage of the many digital tools already available to explore these parks, including:

Visitors with camping or Fiery Furnace tour reservations impacted by this closure may cancel or reschedule online at www.Recreation.gov, or by calling (877) 444-6777.

We will continue to provide updates and will notify the public when we resume full operations on park social media channels and these two web pages:

Updates about general NPS operations will be posted on www.nps.gov/coronavirus. For additional information about Southeast Utah Group parks, visit our websites:

Arches National Park

Canyonlands National Park

Hovenweep National Monument

Natural Bridges National Monument


corona arch

Moab COVID-19 Updates

Current Moab Status – UPDATED July 8, 2020

  • Arches National Park – Trails, Overlooks, Bookstore & Visitor Services Open (Campground is scheduled to Open July 19, 2020) – Fiery Furnace Hikes & Backcountry Camping Closed

  • Canyonlands National Park – Trails, Overlooks, Campground, Bookstore & Visitor Services Open

  • Dead Horse Point State Park – Open

  • Trails (OHV/Hiking/Biking) on BLM Land – Open

  • Developed Campgrounds on BLM Land – Open (50% of Campgrounds)

  • Dispersed Camping on BLM Land – Open

  • National Forest Developed Campgrounds: Warner Lake (excluding cabin), Oowah Lake, Mason Draw – Open

  • Commercial Campgrounds & RV Parks – Open

  • Overnight Accommodations (Hotels/Motels/B&B’s/Condos/Guest Homes) – Open

  • Restaurants – Open

  • Guides & Outfitters – Open

  • Equipment Rentals – Open

  • Vehicle Rentals – Open

  • Shops & Galleries – Open

Grand County Fire Restrictions

Thank you for wearing a face covering in Moab.
Face coverings that completely cover the nose and mouth are now mandatory in Moab. They must be worn in public areas including indoor or outdoor space open to the public where consistent social distancing of at least 6 feet is not possible, reasonable or prudent. Free masks are available at the Moab Information Center, on the corner of Main and Center Streets, and at the national parks.


Frequently Asked Questions

Are face coverings mandatory in Moab?

Yes, face coverings that completely cover the nose and mouth are now mandatory in Moab. They must be worn in public areas including indoor or outdoor space open to the public, where consistent social distancing of at least 6 feet is not possible, reasonable or prudent. Local businesses may pick up free face coverings at the Canyonlands Copy Center, 375 S. Main St., in Moab. The Moab Information Center (The MIC), on the corner of Main and Center Streets, and the National Park Service will distribute face coverings to area visitors. Read the full Health Order here.

Are the national parks open?

Yes. Arches and Canyonlands national parks are continuing to increase visitor services:

  • Open: All park roads, hiking trails, viewing areas, bookstores, and visitor centers (services are located outside)
  • Opening: Camping at Island in the Sky is scheduled to open on July 1, 2020. Devil’s Garden Campground in Arches National Park is scheduled to open on July 19, 2020.
  • Closed at Arches: Fiery Furnace and backcountry camping
  • Online only: Canyonlands backcountry and river permits

Are trails (OHV, hiking, biking) on public lands (Bureau of Land Management) open?

Yes. All trails on BLM land are open.

Can I camp on public lands (Bureau of Land Management)?

On May 29, 2020 the BLM re-opened approximately half of the campgrounds for public access. These campgrounds are the following:

  • Along SR-128: Goose Island, Big Bend, Upper Onion, Lower Onion, Fisher Towers, Hittle Bottom, and Dewey Bridge;
  • Along SR-279: Jaycee Park, Williams Bottom, and Gold Bar;
  • Along SR-313: Lone Mesa, Horsethief, and Cowboy;
  • Along Kane Creek: King’s Bottom, Hunter Canyon, and Ledges A-D;
  • Sand Flats Recreation Area: Campgrounds A through D are available;
  • Other areas: Ken’s Lake, Courthouse Rock, Windwhistle, Hatch, Rock Castle, and Westwater.

Is Dead Horse Point State Park open?

Yes, the park is open to everyone.

Spend It Like A Local


Moab Cares

• About our Community

• About our Visitors

As we recover and begin resuming our usual activities during the Covid-19 crisis, we want to ensure the safety of our visitors and locals alike. While restrictions or recommendations may change, we want to let you know that Moab is striving to keep our destination a safe, healthy place to live and visit.

What Moab is doing as a destination:

  • Adhering to the guidelines set forth by the Southeast Utah Health Department and the Governor of Utah.
  • Supporting the temporary closure of national parks and camping on public lands. These closures are important to help Grand County and the Southeast Utah Health Department manage the phased reopening of lodging in Grand County by controlling the amount of recreational tourism that increases impacts upon our small, critical-access hospital, medical and law enforcement teams, Grand County EMS and Search & Rescue.
  • Providing hand-washing stations throughout town.
  • Facilitating social distancing as much as possible.

What Moab is asking you to do:

  • Wear a face covering in indoor public spaces and when you cannot socially distance.
  • Wash your hands with soap for at least 20 seconds.
  • Use hand sanitizer when hand washing isn’t available
  • Sneeze or cough into your elbow.
  • Avoid touching your face.
  • Use social distancing as much as possible.
  • If sick, avoid contact with others and self-quarantine.
Moab Face Mask

Thank you for wearing a face covering while in Moab!


Prevention

We care about you! We are asking everyone to follow the President’s guidelines:

  • Avoid social gatherings in groups of more than 10 people
  • Use restaurant drive-thru, pickup, or delivery options
  • Avoid discretionary travel, shopping trips, and social visits
  • Listen and follow the directions of your state and local authorities
  • If you feel sick, stay at home. Do not go to work, Contact your medical provider.
  • Avoid touching your face
  • Sneeze or cough into a tissue, or the inside of your elbow
  • Disinfect frequently used items and surfaces as much as possible

We value all of our visitors and our local community. Please follow the guidelines above. You are all important to us! For additional prevention tips visit coronavirus.gov

Where can I find additional information on COVID-19’s impact on Moab?

For more information we encourage you to visit Moab City COVID-19 Info & Moab COVID-19 Task Force.