×
attractions activities lodging + campgrounds area info services transportation events submit an event moab snapshot contact search Visit Utah

Moab Information Center

Welcome to Moab

Once you arrive in Moab, your first stop should be the Moab Information Center (MIC). Conveniently located at the corner of Main and Center Street in Moab, the MIC offers information on recreational opportunities and visitor services throughout southeastern Utah. Allow some time for the interpretive displays and large gift shop featuring guide books, maps, videos, videos, postcards, and much more.

 
  • Information about recreation opportunities in southeastern Utah
  • Current weather and road information
  • Information about hotels, restaurants, tours operators, shuttles, and other services for travelers
  • Interpretive displays
  • Gift shop featuring guide books, maps, videos, postcards, and much more
  • Free WiFi
  • Clean restrooms

Experience the stunning new film, “Welcome to Moab”, in the MIC’s 4K Ultra HD Theater

 

“Welcome to Moab” is an immersive 4K theater film that provides visitors with an outstanding overview of the public lands and diverse activities possible around Moab, Utah. The film combines impressive ultra-high-definition 4K footage, time lapse photography, and aerial perspectives of the ruggedly spectacular public lands that surround Moab. Watching this 20 minute film at the beginning of your visit will provide the best possible orientation for visiting this spectacular part of the world. The film is repeated throughout the day at the Moab Information Center.

You don’t have to wait until you get to Moab to watch the new “Welcome to Moab” film. The film is now available on Blu-ray & DVD! In addition to a great overview of all there is to see and do in the Moab area, the disc also includes:
  • Canyonlands by Air
  • Arches Winter’s Day
  • Moab Jeep Tour
  • Moab Mountain Biking
Click here to order your copy today.

MIC Lecture Series – From April to November each year, the Lecture Series presents talks by regional experts about the Moab region’s fascinating past and present, places and people, wildlife, plants, dinosaurs and more! Talks generally begin at 6:00 P.M. and are FREE to the public. Lectures are co-sponsored by the Museum of Moab. The Moab Information Center (MIC) is conveniently located on the corner of Main & Center Streets.

Canyonlands Natural History Association – If you need to purchase information prior to your visit, many of the guidebooks and maps for sale in the Moab Information Center are available from the Canyonlands Natural History Association. Visit their website at: www.cnha.org

Address:
Moab Information Center 25 E Center Street Moab, UT 84532
Hours:

7 Days/Week
9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Location:


Arches National Park

Arches National Park

The world’s largest concentration of natural sandstone arches.

Timed Entry Reservation System Update for 2024

Between November 1, 2023 and March 31, 2024, timed entry tickets will not be necessary to enter the park.

Between April 1, 2024 and October 31, 2024 Arches National Park is implementing a Pilot Timed Entry Reservation System. This system provides reliable access to the park and results in a higher quality visitor experience. Prior to this system there was no guarantee of access to the park during the peak season. With a little advanced planning visitors enjoyed a stress-free visit to one of the most beautiful national parks in the nation. Read more…


Introduction

Located just 5 miles (8 km) north of Moab, you will discover the awe-inspiring Arches National Park, boasting the largest concentration of natural sandstone arches on Earth. With over 2,000 arches scattered across its vast 76,518-acre expanse, this park is a treasure trove of geological wonders. Towering sandstone fins, majestic balanced rocks, and soaring pinnacles and spires dominate the landscape, leaving visitors in awe as they explore the park’s numerous viewpoints and hiking trails.

Embarking on a scenic drive along a paved route, visitors can easily access the park’s key viewpoints, allowing them to soak in the breathtaking vistas. However, Arches National Park offers more than just stunning arches. Its rock formations captivate the imagination of both children and adults alike. Families can venture out of their vehicles and embark on easy trails, providing kids with the perfect opportunity to intimately experience the arches up close.

For avid hikers seeking a deeper connection with this natural marvel, the park offers an array of trail options. Whether you prefer a leisurely twenty-minute stroll leading to some of the largest arches in the park or an adventurous trek into lesser-explored areas, Arches National Park caters to all levels of hiking enthusiasts.

Immerse yourself in the splendor of Arches National Park, where nature’s artistry unfolds at every turn.

Distance from Moab
5 miles (8km)
Directions from Moab
The entrance of Arches is located 5 miles (8km) north of Moab, along highway 191.
Park Hours
Arches National Park is normally open year-round, 24 hours a day. The park is very busy between March and October. To avoid traffic, we recommend entering the park before 8 am or after 3 pm.
Entrance Fee
$30/vehicle – Good for 7 days. (Subject to change.)
Visitor Center & Hours
The visitor center includes interactive exhibits, educational kiosks, a 150-seat auditorium, and a bookstore featuring guide books, maps, DVD’s, postcards, and much more. The park is open 24 hours/day, 365 days/year; however the visitor center hours vary by season. (435) 719-2299

WEBCAM 1

WEBCAM 2

TWITTER


Arches National Park’s Twitter page is a great source of up-to-the-minute park information. Check it out here.











Winter Sunset at Delicate Arch
The Three Gossips at Arches National Park
Arches National Park

Suggested Activities

A Few Hours
Drive the 36 mile (58km) round trip Scenic Drive.
1/2 Day
Drive the Scenic Drive and hike some of the easy short trails in the park, such as the Park Avenue Trail and trails in the Windows Section of the park.
Full Day

Drive the Scenic Drive and hike some of the longer trails in the park, such as the trails to Double O Arch, Tower Arch, Delicate Arch, and Landscape Arch.
Several Days
Hikers can experience a wide variety of hiking trails, including some of the lesser-seen, yet equally spectacular areas of the park such as the “Primitive Loop” in the Devil’s Garden section of the park.

Camping

The Devils Garden Campground is located eighteen miles from the park entrance and is open year-round. Facilities include potable water, picnic tables, grills, as well as both pit-style and flush toilets. There are no showers. Bring your own wood or charcoal for the grills. Some sites will accommodate RVs up to 30 feet in length.Telephone and on-line reservations for both group and individual sites may be made through recreation.gov. Reservations are not accepted by the park, and the park does not maintain information about site availability.

  • Individual Sites: You can reserve standard campsites up to 6 months in advance for stays March 1-October 31. All sites are usually reserved months in advance. Between November 1 and February 28, sites are first-come, first-served. Facilities include drinking water, picnic tables, grills, and both pit-style and flush toilets. You can reserve campsites for nights between March 1 and October 31. Between November 1 and February 28, all sites are first-come, first served. Phone and online reservations for both group and individual sites must be made through recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. You can make reservations for standard sites no fewer than four days and no more than 6 months in advance. The fee per night for an individual Devils Garden campsite i $25. Group size is limited to 10 people and 2 vehicles.
  • Group Sites: Group sites can be reserved up to 12 months in advance. The campground has two sites for groups of 11 or more people. Juniper Basin campsite accommodates up to 55 people and is available March 1 to October 31; Canyon Wren campsite accommodates up to 35 and may be reserved year-round. No RVs or trailers are permitted in the group sites.
Campsites are usually reserved months in advance during the busy season (March-October). If you have not reserved a site prior to arrival at the park during these months, plan on utilizing other camping options in the Moab area. There are no services inside Arches National Park. The nearest place to get food, gas, and supplies is Moab, approximately 45-60 minutes’ drive from the campground.

Recreation.gov Mobile App

Food

Please note that food is not available within the park. The closest restaurants are either in the town of Moab, at Dead Horse Point State Park, or at the dinosaur museum at the intersection of Highways 191 and 313 (entrance fee is not required to access the restaurant).

Park Highlights

Delicate Arch in Arches National Park

Delicate Arch

Delicate Arch

People come from all over the world to visit Arches National Park, and visiting Delicate Arch is on the top of many visitors’ to-do lists. In a park with over 2,000 stone arches, this particular free-standing arch has become a widely recognized symbol of the state of Utah and one of the most famous geologic features in the world. The light opening beneath the arch is 46 feet high and 32 feet wide, making it the largest free-standing arch in the park.
Learn More About Delicate Arch Hiking Trail

Balanced Rock in Arches National Park

Balanced Rock

Balanced Rock

A short paved trail leads visitors to the base of Balanced Rock. The landform’s total height is 128 feet, with the huge balanced rock rising 55 feet above its base.

Landscape Arch in Arches National Park

Landscape Arch

Landscape Arch

The longest natural rock span in the world, this arch’s opening is 306 feet wide – 6 feet longer than a football field. A nine story building would easily fit beneath this thin span. In 1991, a massive slab of rock fell from its underside, resulting in an even thinner ribbon of rock.

Wildflowers in Arches National Park

Spring Wildflowers

Spring Wildflowers

April and May bring a variety of desert wildflowers to Arches.

Double Arch in Arches National Park

Double Arch

Double Arch

Located in the Windows Section of Arches National Park, Double Arch was used as a backdrop for portions of the 1988 movie “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade”. Numerous other movies have been filmed in Arches National Park, including Thelma and Louise in 1991.

Park Avenue Trail in Arches National Park

Park Avenue

Park Avenue

From Park Avenue parking area, the trail descends steeply into a spectacular canyon and continues down the wash to Courthouse Towers. If you have a shuttle driver, you can begin at one point and be picked up at the other. For round-trip hiking, retrace your steps along the trail rather than walk along the park road.

Arches National Park in Winter

Arches in Winter

Arches in Winter

Winter brings a blanket of pristine snow to Arches, providing dramatic contrast to the surrounding red rocks.

Hiking in Arches National Park

Family Hiking

Family Hiking

There are many family friendly hikes in Arches, including the hike to Turret Arch in the Windows Section.

Biological Soil Crust

Your help is crucial in preserving our trails and protecting the fragile soil that sustains the desert ecosystem. The biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, serves as the foundation for desert plant life. This unique black, knobby crust is composed of diverse living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the delicate balance of the desert environment.

However, this soil crust is exceptionally delicate and can take several decades to regenerate. Even a single footstep can cause irreparable damage that can persist for years, impacting the entire ecosystem. We urge you to stay on designated roads, routes, and trails to ensure the preservation of this fragile life. In areas where hiking trails are not established, it is advisable to hike on sandy washes or bare rock surfaces to minimize the impact on the soil.

By remaining vigilant and adhering to these guidelines, you contribute to the long-term sustainability of the desert ecosystem and help safeguard its natural beauty for generations to come. Let’s work together to keep all of our trails open and protect the invaluable biological soil crust.

Hiking

One of the more rewarding ways to see the park is on foot. Arches features a wide variety of hikes, from short 10 minute walks (suitable for all ages) to 4 hour hikes into some of the remote sections of the park.

Easy Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Balanced Rock

0.3 mi (0.5 km) Round Trip

15-30 min

A loop trail around the base of a fragile, picturesque rock formation.

Broken Arch

1.2 mi (2 km) Round Trip or 2 mi (3.2 km) with loop

30-60 min

From the Sand Dune Arch parking area, the trail cuts across a large meadow to the arch and continues to the campground. Loop trail leads through fin canyons with sand dunes and slickrock.

Delicate Arch Viewpoint

100 yards (91 meters) round trip

10-15 min

In addition to the short accessible trail, another (moderately strenuous) hiking trail climbs one-half mile (0.8 km) toward Delicate Arch and ends at the rim of a steep canyon that separates the viewpoint from the arch. (This is not the popular trail to Delicate Arch, which starts at the Wolfe Ranch parking area. See below.)

Desert Nature Trail

0.2 mi (0.3 km) round trip

15-30 min

Discover the adaptations of plants and animals in the desert on a self-guided nature walk. Trail guide available at the trailhead near the Visitor Center.

Double Arch

0.5 mi (0.8 km) round trip

15-30 min

A relatively flat, sandy trail leads to the base of two giant arch spans which are joined at one end.

Landscape Arch

2 mi (3.2 km) round trip

30-60 min

A relatively flat, gravel-surfaced trail leads to a spectacular ribbon of rock, whose span is more than a football field in length. Short side trips to Tunnel and Pine Tree Arches.

Sand Dune Arch

0.4 mi (0.6 km) round trip

15-30 min

Trail leads through deep sand to a secluded arch among sandstone fins. Kids love the sand!

Skyline Arch

0.4 mi (0.6 km) round trip

10-20 min

A short hike on a flat, well-defined trail.

The Windows

1 mi (1.6 km) round trip

30-60 min

A gentle climb up a gravel loop trail leads to three massive arches (North and South Windows and Turret Arch). An alternate return, slightly longer, is by way of the primitive loop around the back of the two Windows. The primitive loop trail starts at the South Window viewpoint.

Moderate Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Park Avenue

1 mi (1.6 km) one way

30-60 min

From Park Avenue parking area, the trail descends steeply into a spectacular canyon and continues down the wash to the Courthouse Towers parking area. If you have a shuttle driver, you can begin at one parking area and be picked up at the other. For round-trip hiking, retrace your steps along the trail.

Tower Arch

3.4 mi (5.6 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

The trail climbs a steep, but short, rock wall, then cuts across a valley and then meanders through sandstone fins and sand dunes. An alternate, shorter trail (0.3 mile [0.4 km] one way), begins at the end of the four-wheel-drive road on the west side of Tower Arch. This unpaved road washes out quickly in rainstorms; inquire at the visitor center about road conditions before heading out.

Difficult Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Devils Garden Primitive Loop

7.2 mi (11.5 km) round trip

3-5 hrs

Longest of the maintained trails in the park, the Devils Garden Trail leads to eight awe-inspiring arches. Expect narrow ledges with rocky surface hiking and scrambling on slickrock. Not recommended when rock is wet or snowy.

Double O Arch

4 mi (6.4 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

Beyond Landscape Arch, the trail becomes more challenging as it climbs over sandstone slabs; footing is rocky; there are narrow ledges with exposure to heights. Spur trails lead to Partition and Navajo Arches. Dark Angel is one-half mile (0.8 km) farther. Trail guide available at trailhead.

Delicate Arch

3 mi (4.8 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

Take at least 1 quart (1 liter) of water per person! There is no shade. Open slickrock with some exposure to heights. The first half-mile is a wide, well-defined trail. Upon reaching the slickrock, follow the rock cairns. The trail climbs gradually and levels out toward the top of this rock face. Just before you get to Delicate Arch, the trail goes along a rock ledge for about 200 yards. Elevation change: 480 feet (146 meters)

Backcountry Permits

The park’s backcountry is mostly rough terrain, inaccessible by established trails with very limited water sources. While Arches National Park is known for its outstanding geologic features, it also contains irreplaceable cultural resources and sensitive high desert ecosystems. Water is rarely available in the backcountry; plan to carry all you need. Primary safety considerations include steep terrain, loose rock, lightning, flash floods, and dehydration. You must know and comply with all regulations.

You must have a permit for all overnight stays in the backcountry. Backpacking permits are no longer issued at Arches Visitor Center. We now issue permits in person at the Backcountry Permit Office two miles south of Moab up to seven days before the trip start date and up to 4:00 PM MST. Each permit is limited to seven people, three nights per campsite, for a total of seven nights. Permits cost $7 per person.

NPS Backcountry Permit Office
2282 SW Resource Blvd.
Moab, UT 84532

Electric Bicycles (e-bikes)

On August 30, 2019 the National Park Service announced a new electric bicycle (e-bike) policy for national parks, expanding recreational opportunities and accessibility. The policy supports Secretary’s Order 3376, signed by U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt on August 29, 2019, that directs Department of the Interior (DOI) bureaus to create a clear and consistent e-bike policy on all federal lands managed by the Department.

Beginning October 1, 2019, visitors to Southeast Utah Group parks (Arches and Canyonlands national parks and Hovenweep and Natural Bridges national monuments) will be allowed to use e-bikes where traditional bicycles are allowed. Bicycles and e-bikes are allowed on paved and unpaved roads that are open to the public. Bicycles and e-bikes are not allowed on any trails in the parks.

There are no charging stations in the parks. Generators are not allowed in the backcountry. This change in e-bike policy applies to private and commercial use in the parks.

The National Park Service announcement and the agency’s new e-bike policy are available online at www.nps.gov/orgs/1207/ebikepolicy.htm.

Commercial Tours

The following Moab companies offer commercial tours in Arches National Park:

Business

Phone

Type of Tour

Adrift Adventures

435-259-8594

Van/bus tours departing 3 times per day, full & half day backcountry 4×4 tours

Canyonlands Field Institute

800-860-5262

Sunset tour with short hikes

Deep Desert Expeditions

435-259-1565

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Desert Highlights

435-259-4433

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Dreamride

435-259-6419

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

JG Outfitters

435-220-0312

Guided Tours and Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Moab Adventure Center

888-622-4097

Arches Bus Tours

Moab Scenic Adventures

435-260-8913

Arches Half and Full Day Tours

Navtec Expeditions

800-833-1278

Front and back country tours available

Plateau Restoration

435-259-7733

Van tour with optional hikes

Tom Till Tours

435-259-5327

Photography tours in Arches and Canyonlands

Wild West Voyages

435-355-0776

Morning, Full Day, and Sunset Sightseeing and Guided Hiking Tours

Windgate Adventures

435-260-9802

Photography tours in Arches and Canyonlands

Photography

Arches National Park is a paradise for photographers. Under conditions of constantly changing light, the red rock landscape provides limitless photographic opportunities. Often, the difference between an average photograph and an exceptional photograph is good lighting. Low sun angles at sunrise and sunset can add brilliant color to the red rock. Scattered clouds can also add depth to an image and a passing storm can provide extremely dramatic lighting.
Canyonlands Photography Canyonlands Photography
Canyonlands Photography Canyonlands Photography

Photographing Delicate Arch

Over one million people visit Arches National Park every year, and just about everyone wants to see all of the major views within the park. One of the most heavily visited arches is Delicate Arch. As a result of its popularity, you should always expect to see people surrounding this world famous arch. Although it may occasionally happen, it is unrealistic to expect a solitary experience around Delicate Arch. Be courteous to other visitors during your visit to the arch, and do not expect people to move away from this world famous landmark during your photographs. Remember that not everyone who visits this arch is a photographer. Most people simply want to experience the joy of standing next to such a beautiful landmark. People can add scale to any photo of Delicate Arch, so make your visit a great shared experience for everyone involved. Delicate Arch Photographers

Try not to limit your creativity by simply capturing images of iconic places using the same composition as countless photographers before you. Arches National Park contains thousands of arches and vast expanses of breathtaking scenery just waiting for you to introduce your own personal style and interpretation. For those seeking solitude, Arches has much to offer beyond its iconic places. For example, consider a hike to Double O Arch, returning via the Primitive Trail, for some of the most spectacular scenery in the park. Just remember to bring enough memory cards to capture all of the great views!

Best Times / Locations to Photograph

Early Morning Late Afternoon
Moab Fault Park Avenue
The Three Gossips Courthouse Towers
Sheep Rock Petrified Dunes
The Great Wall Balanced Rock
Turret Arch The Garden of Eden
The Spectacles North and South Windows
Double Arch Delicate Arch (at end of main trail)
Cache Valley Fiery Furnace
Wolfe Ranch Skyline Arch
Landscape Arch Fins in Devil Garden
Double O Arch Tower Arch
Fiery Furnace in Arches National Park

Partners

Canyonlands Natural History Association

Canyonlands Natural History Association (CNHA) is a nonprofit organization assisting the National Park Service in its educational, interpretive and scientific programs throughout southeast Utah. Known as a "cooperating association," CNHA’s goals include enhancing visitors’ understanding and appreciation of public lands by providing a selection of quality, educational materials for sale in many vistor centers. Twenty percent of these sales is returned to the National Park Service and other federal land management agencies.

CNHA operates the bookstore at Arches Visitor Center.

Friends of Arches and Canyonlands Parks

The Friends of Arches and Canyonlands Parks: Bates Wilson Legacy Fund provides direct support to Arches and Canyonlands national parks and Natural Bridges and Hovenweep national monuments in order to enhance existing projects in these spectacular areas, and to conserve the land and its cultural treasures for present and future generations to enjoy.

This mission honors the legendary work of Superintendent Bates Wilson, who came to Arches in 1949, inspiring and leading the effort that resulted in the establishment of Canyonlands National Park in 1964. The Friends Group offices are in the Rock House behind Arches Visitor Center, where Bates once lived with his family.


Dead Horse Point State Park

The view from Dead Horse Point is one of the most photographed scenic vistas in the world.

Help us Protect Moab's Public Land Treasures

Introduction

32 miles (51.5 km) from Moab, Dead Horse Point State Park is one of Utah’s most spectacular state parks. The view from Dead Horse Point is one of the most photographed scenic vistas in the world. Towering 2,000 feet above the Colorado River, the overlook provides a breathtaking panorama of Canyonlands’ sculpted pinnacles and buttes. Millions of years of geologic activity created the spectacular views from Dead Horse Point State Park. Deposition of sediments by ancient oceans, freshwater lakes, streams and wind blown sand dunes created the rock layers of canyon country. Igneous activity formed the high mountains that rise like cool blue islands from the desert below.

The legend of Dead Horse Point states that in the late 1800’s the point was used as a corral for wild mustangs roaming the mesa top. Cowboys herded them across the narrow neck of land and onto the point. The neck was then fenced off with branches and brush. One time, for some unknown reason, horses were left corralled on the waterless point where they died of thirst within view of the Colorado River 2,000 feet below.

There are miles of pet-friendly developed hiking trails in the park, including a paved trail which provides easy access to some of the most scenic views. Mountain Bikers will love the new Intrepid Trail System at Dead Horse Point. With slickrock sections, looping singletrack, sandy washes, and incredible scenery, the Intrepid Trail System provides a great taste of what Moab mountain biking is all about. This is the perfect ride for families and offers spectacular views of the Colorado River and Canyonlands National Park.

Distance from Moab
32 Miles (51.5 km)
Directions from Moab
Drive 9 miles (14.5 km) northwest of Moab on US 191 and then 23 miles (37 km) southwest on Utah 313. Driving time to the visitor center from Moab is roughly 45 minutes.
Park Hours
6:00 am – 10:00 pm
Fees
Day Use fees (valid for 2 consecutive days starting from the date of purchase):
  • $20 per vehicle (up to 8 passengers)
  • $15 for Utah Seniors (Utah residents 62 or over)
  • $10 per motorcycle
  • $10 pedestrian or cyclist (biking into park)
  • Commercial day-use fee: $5 per person
Visitor Center and Hours
The visitor center is open year-round, 9am-5pm, has facilities for the disabled, an information area, exhibits, rest rooms, water, publications and souvenirs.
(435) 259-2614

Kayenta and Windgate Campgrounds

Nestled within a grove of juniper, the Kayenta Campground at Dead Horse Point State Park offers a peaceful, shaded respite from the surrounding desert. All twenty-one sites offer lighted shade structures, picnic tables, fire rings, and tent pads. All sites are also equipped with RV electrical hookups. Modern restroom facilities are available, and trails lead directly from the campground to various points of interest within the park. 21 sites/4 non-reservable/1 ADA accessible.

New in 2018, the Wingate Campground sits atop the mesa with far reaching views to the area’s mountain ranges and deep canyons. This campground contains thirty-one (31) campsites, twenty (20) of which have electrical hookups that support RV or tent campers while eleven (11) are walk-in, tent only sites. All sites have fire-pits, picnic tables under shade shelters, and access to bathrooms with running water and dish washing sinks. RV sites will accommodate vehicles up to 56′ and there is a dump station at the entrance to the campground. To make a camping reservation contact Reserve America at 1-800-322-3770, or visit reserveamerica.com.

Yurts

The nine yurts at Dead Horse Point State Park provide the most luxurious accommodations that can be found atop the mesa. A perfect location for experiencing sunrise and sunset, the yurts enjoy sweeping views of both the canyons to the south and the La Sal mountains to the east. A private spur of the Intrepid Trail System gives easy access to the otherwise remote Big Chief and Pyramid Canyon overlooks. Each yurt contains sleeping space for up to six people, in the form of bunked double beds and a pullout futon couch. An outdoor propane grill allows for cooking on site, with the park providing propane free of charge. Heat, air conditioning, and electrical outlets are available, and comfortable seating areas both indoors and outdoors provide for a relaxing environment in any weather condition. Modern restroom facilities are located within easy walking distance.

Please note that pets are not allowed in the yurts, or in vehicles outside of the yurts. If you would like to spend the night in the park with your furry friend, consider the Kayenta Campground.

To make a camping reservation contact Reserve America at 1-800-322-3770, or visit reserveamerica.com.

Camping Fees

  • Camping fees are $50.00 per night for RV campsites and $40.00 per night for hike-in tent-only campsites.
  • Yurts: $150 per night year round, maximum of 6 people per site
  • Camping and yurt fees accommodate one vehicle. Extra vehicles are charged a $20 fee.
  • Reservations can be made four months in advance by calling 1-800-322-3770 or online at reserveamerica.com. First-come, first-served openings may be available at the park.
  • There are no water hookups for RV’s. Fill up your RVs in Moab.

Park Highlights

Pet Friendly Hiking Trails

Pet Friendly Hiking Trails

Eight miles of pet friendly hiking trails in the park include two joining loops around the rim and several spurs to beautiful viewpoints.

Mountain Biking

Mountain Biking

The Intrepid Trail System has three hiking and biking loops ranging from one to nine miles with varying degrees of difficulty.

Yurts

Yurts

Nine yurts are available for overnight use and are available by reservation. Open year-round.

Experience Dead Horse Point

Experience Dead Horse Point

Dead Horse Point’s combination of breathtaking scenery and easy accessibility has made it a must-see for visitors to the Moab area.

Night Skies

Dead Horse Point State Park, recognized as an International Dark Sky Park in 2016, is one of the most active and accessible areas to stargaze in the Moab area. Its high plateau location, mountains far in the distance and cities out of sight yields a nearly full view of celestial sphere. Park staff routinely provide programs celebrating the night sky, from walks under the full moon to gazing through telescopes at objects millions of light years away. Whether you want to enjoy by yourself or join a ranger, Dead Horse Point State Park is a premier spot to see the skies our ancestors wondered over and survived with.

Download Dead Horse Point State Park’s Dark Sky Brochure to learn more.

Biological Soil Crust

Your help is crucial in preserving our trails and protecting the fragile soil that sustains the desert ecosystem. The biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, serves as the foundation for desert plant life. This unique black, knobby crust is composed of diverse living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the delicate balance of the desert environment.

However, this soil crust is exceptionally delicate and can take several decades to regenerate. Even a single footstep can cause irreparable damage that can persist for years, impacting the entire ecosystem. We urge you to stay on designated roads, routes, and trails to ensure the preservation of this fragile life. In areas where hiking trails are not established, it is advisable to hike on sandy washes or bare rock surfaces to minimize the impact on the soil.

By remaining vigilant and adhering to these guidelines, you contribute to the long-term sustainability of the desert ecosystem and help safeguard its natural beauty for generations to come. Let’s work together to keep all of our trails open and protect the invaluable biological soil crust.

Mountain Biking the Intrepid Trail

Overview
Deadhorse Point State Park, 32 miles west of Moab

Difficulty
Easy to Moderate

Length
Big Chief: 3.6 miles
Crossroads: 1.7 miles
Great Pyramid: 2.2 miles
Intrepid: 0.5 miles
Prickly Pair: 3.0 miles
Raven Roll: 1.7 miles
Twisted Tree: 1.5 miles
Whiptail: 2.6 miles

Elevation @ Trailhead
5900’

Season
Ideal in spring, fall and winter; midday heat in July and August

Directions
Nine miles northwest of Moab on US 191 and then 23 miles southwest on Utah 313 to the end of the highway.

Trail Description

With slickrock sections, looping singletrack, sandy washes, and incredible scenery, the Intrepid Trail System provides a great taste of what Moab mountain biking is all about. This is the perfect ride for families and offers spectacular views of the Colorado River and Canyonlands National Park.

The Intrepid Trail System has 8 segments totaling just over 16 miles of trail for mountain bikers and hikers to enjoy varying through degrees of intermediate difficulty. The eastern section of the trail is easier and often recommended for beginning riders in the Moab area, while the western loop is more challenging. The entirety of the system will offer opportunities for visitors of all ages and abilities, and provide breathtaking views. Unlike the hiking trails, pets are not welcome on the Intrepid Trail System for human, animal and environmental safety.

The Intrepid Trail was made possible through great public/private partnerships. Intrepid Potash, Inc., for which the trail is named, gave $20,000 for construction of a new single-track, non-motorized trail system. The trail was built by Trail Mix, a local volunteer organization, and volunteers from the Utah Conservation Corps, American Conservation Experience and Moab Trails Alliance. The National Park Service and Utah State Parks also worked on the project. Dead Horse Point State Park is located approximately 30 miles from Moab. The park also offers camping and day-use facilities, visitor center, and naturalist programs. For more information call (435) 259-2614.






Canyonlands National Park

The largest national park in Utah, with diversity that staggers the imagination.

Introduction

Canyonlands, Utah’s largest national park, offers an astonishing array of natural wonders. For an easy and rewarding experience, head to the Island in the Sky District, a mere 32 miles (51.5 km) from Moab. Along the paved scenic drive you’ll find numerous pullouts that grant magnificent views of the park and surrounding public lands. Adventurers can also venture into the backcountry using hiking trails and four-wheel-drive roads for day trips or overnight stays.

Perched atop a towering 1500-foot mesa, the Island in the Sky truly lives up to its name. With 20 miles (32.2 km) of paved roads, this district unlocks some of the most breathtaking vistas in Canyon Country. From these elevated viewpoints, visitors can often see over 100 miles (161 km) in any direction, revealing panoramic scenes that stretch across thousands of square miles of canyon country. Take a brief day-hike or unwind during a serene late afternoon while basking in the beauty of a sunset. Whether you have a few hours or a few days to spare, the Island in the Sky guarantees an unforgettable experience for the whole family, immersing you in the wonders of Canyon Country.

Distance from Moab
32 miles (51.5km)
Directions from Moab
Take Highway 191 10 miles (16 km) north to Highway 313, and then drive southwest 22 miles (35 km). Driving time to the visitor center from Moab is roughly 40 minutes.
Park Hours
Canyonlands National Park is normally open year-round, 24 hours a day.
Entrance Fee
$30/vehicle – Good for 7 days (Subject to change.)
Visitor Center & Hours

Canyonlands is open year-round, 24 hours a day, however the park visitor centers close for the winter. Call (435) 719-2313 for park information.

MAP

PARK WEBCAM

Camping

Island in the Sky Campground (Willow Flat) has 12 sites, first-come, first-served. The campground is open year-round. The spectacular Green River Overlook is nearby. Nightly camping fee is $15 per site. Sites fill quickly spring through fall. There are toilets, picnic tables, and fire rings in the campground. There are no hookups for RVs and no water at the campground. You can get drinking water outside the visitor center spring through fall.

In addition to the campground located within the park, there is a great selection of additional campgrounds in the surrounding area. Moab has many commercial campgrounds with RV hookups in addition to a huge assortment of BLM public campgrounds in extremely scenic locations. Click here for a complete list of all the camping options available in the Moab area.

Suggested Activities

A Few Hours
Drive the park’s 20 miles (32.2 km) of paved roads and enjoy the spectacular views. Sunrise and sunset are particularly beautiful times of day to enjoy these lofty panoramic views of canyon country.
1/2 Day
Drive the paved scenic drive and hike some of the shorter trails, such as the Mesa Arch or Upheaval Dome Trails. A recent theory suggests that Upheaval Dome was created by a meteor impact.
Full Day
Drive the paved scenic drive and hike some of the longer trails in the park, such as the 5 mile (8 km) round trip Neck Spring Trail. Those with high clearance/4WD vehicles can drive down the Shafer Trail to the White Rim and explore Musselman Arch, or drive all the way down to the Colorado River via Lathrop Canyon. Note that a Day Use Permit is required.
Several Days
Backpackers can experience the solitude of Canyonlands by hiking some of the trails from the mesa top to the White Rim (steep & strenuous) and spend the night in the backcountry. 4-wheel drive enthusiasts or mountain bikers may want to travel the 100 mile “White Rim Trail” which loops below the Island in the Sky mesa. Reservations for White Rim campsites and a Backcountry Permit is required.

Food

Please note that food is not available within the park. The closest restaurants are either in the town of Moab, at Dead Horse Point State Park, or at the dinosaur museum at the intersection of Highways 191 and 313 (entrance fee is not required to access the restaurant).

Park Highlights

Green River Overlook

Green River Overlook

The Green River meanders beneath the Island in the Sky, as seen from the Green River Overlook. A paved walkway leads right up to the overlook.

Mesa Arch

Mesa Arch

A great hike for families with small children, the .5 mi (.8 km) round trip hike to Mesa Arch rewards visitors with a naturally framed view of canyon country.

Shafer Trail

Shafer Trail

The Shafer Trail descends from the Island in the Sky to the White Rim. A high clearance vehicle is strongly recommended. For current conditions check at the visitor center or call 435-259-4351.

Cataract Canyon

Cataract Canyon

Located in Canyonlands National Park, Cataract Canyon contains fourteen miles of rapids ranging in difficulty up to Class V.

Spring Wildflowers

Spring Wildflowers

Indian Paintbrush are just one of the many wildflowers that populate the Island in the Sky in the Spring (April-June).

Night Sky

Night Sky

Canyonlands National Park, which contains some of the darkest night skies in North America, is a popular destination for stargazers. Click here for the latest sunrise/sunset and moon phase information for Moab.

Biking

Biking

Canyonlands is famous for its mountain biking terrain, particularly for the 100-mile White Rim Road at the Island in the Sky. The Maze also offers some multi-day trip possibilities, though the logistics and roads are more difficult (for the support vehicles, not the bikes).

The Rivers

The Rivers

The Colorado and Green rivers wind through the heart of Canyonlands, cutting through layered sandstone to form two deep canyons. Both rivers are calm upstream of the Confluence, ideal for canoes, kayaks and other shallow water craft. Below the Confluence, the combined flow of both rivers spills down Cataract Canyon with remarkable speed and power, creating a world-class stretch of white water.

Biological Soil Crust

Your help is crucial in preserving our trails and protecting the fragile soil that sustains the desert ecosystem. The biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, serves as the foundation for desert plant life. This unique black, knobby crust is composed of diverse living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the delicate balance of the desert environment.

However, this soil crust is exceptionally delicate and can take several decades to regenerate. Even a single footstep can cause irreparable damage that can persist for years, impacting the entire ecosystem. We urge you to stay on designated roads, routes, and trails to ensure the preservation of this fragile life. In areas where hiking trails are not established, it is advisable to hike on sandy washes or bare rock surfaces to minimize the impact on the soil.

By remaining vigilant and adhering to these guidelines, you contribute to the long-term sustainability of the desert ecosystem and help safeguard its natural beauty for generations to come. Let’s work together to keep all of our trails open and protect the invaluable biological soil crust.

Hiking

The Island in the Sky offers a wide variety of hiking trails ranging from short 30 minute walks on the mesa top, to overnight expeditions all the way down to the Colorado River.

Trails are marked with cairns (small rock piles). Please do not disturb existing cairns or build new ones. Signs are located at trailheads and intersections. All trails leading below the Mesa Top are primitive and rough; carry and know how to use a topographic map. No potable water is available along any of the hiking trails. During the warmest months always carry at least one gallon of water per person, per day.

Mesa Top – Easy Trails

Trail

Distance

Time

Elev. Change

Mesa Arch

0.5mi / 0.8km

30 minutes

100ft / 30m

Mornings are best – Beautiful Arch on cliff edge.

Murphy Point

1.3mi / 1.9km

1 hour

100ft / 30m

Panoramic view with Henry Mountains.

White Rim Overlook

1.5mi / 2.0km

1 hour

25ft / 8m

View of potholes & White Rim Road.

Grand View Point

2.0mi / 3.0km

1.5 hours

50ft / 15m

Panoramic view along cliff edge.

Mesa Top – Moderate Trails

Trail

Distance

Time

Elev. Change

Neck Spring

5.0mi / 8.0km

3 – 4 hours

300ft / 91m

Springs – Evidence of ranching

Aztec Butte

2.0mi / 3.0km

1.5 hours

225ft / 69m

Steep slickrock to top – Granaries.

Whale Rock

1.0mi / 1.5km

1 hour

100ft / 30m

Bare slickrock – Good views.

Upheaval Dome to Main Overlook

1.0mi / 1.5km

30 minutes

50ft / 15m

View into crater

Upheaval Dome to Second Overlook

2.0mi / 3.0km

45 minutes

200ft / 61m

View of crater & upheaval canyon

Mesa Top to White Rim – Steep & Strenuous Trails

Trail

Distance

Time

Elev. Change

Lathrop to White Rim Road

10mi / 16km

5- 7 hours

1600ft / 488m

Views of Colorado River & La Sal Mountains

Lathrop to Colorado River

17mi / 27km

Overnight

2000ft / 610m

River access – Cottonwoods

Murphy Loop

9mi / 14km

5 – 7 hours

1400ft / 427m

Panoramic view from hogback.

Gooseberry

6mi / 10km

4-6 Hours

1400ft/427m

Views of cliffs & La Sal Mountains.

Wilhite

10mi / 16km

6 – 8 hours

1600ft / 488m

Slot canyon across White Rim Road.

Alcove Spring

10mi / 16km

6 – 7 hours

1300ft / 396m

Large alcove, views of Taylor Canyon.

Syncline Loop

8mi / 13km

5 – 7 hours

1300ft / 396m

Canyon hiking – some shade.

Syncline Loop: Upheaval Crater Spur

3mi / 4km

2 hours

350ft / 107m

Some scrambling over rocks.

Syncline Loop: Upheaval Canyon Spur

6mi / 10km

2 – 3 hours

400ft / 122m

Sandy hike along wash bottom.

Biking

With hundreds of miles of four-wheel-drive roads, Canyonlands offers ideal terrain for multi-night mountain bike trips. Most groups travel with vehicle support to haul water and gear since there are few reliable water sources along these roads. For the truly adventurous, self-supported trips with panniers and trailers are also possible. Bikes must remain on designated roads: there are no single-track trails in the park.

Things to Know

  • Overnight Trips: You must have a permit for all overnight trips.
  • Day Trips: You must have a permit for day trips on White Rim, Elephant Hill, Lavender Canyon, and Peekaboo/Horse Canyon roads.
    Groups must camp in designated sites.
  • Reservations for White Rim campsites are very competitive. You may have to make a reservation up to four months in advance.
  • There are no shoulders or bike lanes. Be aware of passing vehicles.

Where Can I Ride My Bike?

You can ride a bicycle on any public roadway in the park. Some roads are better for cycling than others. Check at visitor centers for recommendations and road conditions.

Paved Roads

You can ride on paved roads at the Island in the Sky. You must must ride single file. There are no road shoulders or bike lanes; please be aware of passing vehicles.

Backcountry Roads

Canyonlands is famous for its mountain biking terrain, particularly for the 100-mile White Rim Road at Island in the Sky. The 100-mile White Rim Road loops around and below the Island in the Sky mesa top and provides expansive views of the surrounding area. Bicycle trips usually take three to four days. Overnight and day-use permits are required.

Do I Need a Permit?

  • Day Use: If you’re taking a day trip on the White Rim, Elephant Hill, Lavender Canyon, or Peekaboo/Horse Canyon roads, you need a day-use permit.
  • Overnight: If you’re going on an overnight trip, you need an overnight permit.

During the spring and fall, demand for permits frequently exceeds the number available. If you plan to visit Canyonlands during peak season, especially to bike and camp along the White Rim Road, we recommend making reservations well in advance. You can reserve overnight permits up to four months in advance of the start of your trip. Day-use permits are available up to 24 hours in advance of your trip.

Mountain bike groups must travel single-file, remain on established roads, and camp in designated sites. There is no single-track riding in the park. We recommend a support vehicle for all multi-day bike trips: there are no water sources along most of the roads. Guided trips are available for many destinations within Canyonlands.

Electronic Bicycles (e-bikes)

On August 30, 2019 the National Park Service announced a new electric bicycle (e-bike) policy for national parks, expanding recreational opportunities and accessibility. The policy supports Secretary’s Order 3376, signed by U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt on August 29, 2019, that directs Department of the Interior (DOI) bureaus to create a clear and consistent e-bike policy on all federal lands managed by the Department.

Beginning October 1, 2019, visitors to Southeast Utah Group parks (Arches and Canyonlands national parks and Hovenweep and Natural Bridges national monuments) will be allowed to use e-bikes where traditional bicycles are allowed. Bicycles and e-bikes are allowed on paved and unpaved roads that are open to the public. Bicycles and e-bikes are not allowed on any trails in the parks.

There are no charging stations in the parks. Generators are not allowed in the backcountry. This change in e-bike policy applies to private and commercial use in the parks.

The National Park Service announcement and the agency’s new e-bike policy are available online at www.nps.gov/orgs/1207/ebikepolicy.htm.

Photography

Canyonlands is a paradise for photographers. Under conditions of constantly changing light, the varicolored landscape provides limitless photographic opportunities. Often, the difference between an average photograph and an exceptional photograph is good lighting. Low sun angles at sunrise and sunset can add brilliant color to the rock. Scattered clouds can also add depth to an image and a passing storm can provide extremely dramatic lighting.

Partners

Canyonlands Natural History Association

Canyonlands Natural History Association (CNHA) is a nonprofit organization assisting the National Park Service in its educational, interpretive and scientific programs throughout southeast Utah. Known as a "cooperating association," CNHA’s goals include enhancing visitors’ understanding and appreciation of public lands by providing a selection of quality, educational materials for sale in many vistor centers. Twenty percent of these sales is returned to the National Park Service and other federal land management agencies.

CNHA operates the bookstore at Arches Visitor Center.

Friends of Arches and Canyonlands Parks

The Friends of Arches and Canyonlands Parks: Bates Wilson Legacy Fund provides direct support to Arches and Canyonlands national parks and Natural Bridges and Hovenweep national monuments in order to enhance existing projects in these spectacular areas, and to conserve the land and its cultural treasures for present and future generations to enjoy.

This mission honors the legendary work of Superintendent Bates Wilson, who came to Arches in 1949, inspiring and leading the effort that resulted in the establishment of Canyonlands National Park in 1964. The Friends Group offices are in the Rock House behind Arches Visitor Center, where Bates once lived with his family.


What’s New

New Scheduled Jet Service to Phoenix– Contour Airlines begins scheduled jet service between Moab and Phoenix on February 1, 2024. Read more…

Celebrate 100 Years of Cinematic History in Utah– Utah, a hidden gem among Hollywood’s real-world backlots, has unfurled its scenic beauty to filmmakers for a remarkable century. Read more…

Discover the Magic of Moab in Winter!– With off-season rates making our hotels irresistibly affordable, and an array of retail shops and restaurants welcoming visitors year-round, there’s no better time to bask in the unique charm of Moab in winter. Read more…

Bega Metzner Elected to Prestigious AFCI Board– Our local Film Commissioner is in the news! Read more…

Arches Timed Entry Reservation System Announced for 2024– Between April 1, 2024 and October 31, 2024 Arches National Park is implementing a Pilot Timed Entry Reservation System. Read more…

Free Art Trails & Restaurant Pass– Discover Moab’s vibrant art and culinary scenes with our FREE Restaurant and Art Trails Pass. Unlock the best of Moab’s culture, savor exquisite cuisine, and earn prizes and exclusive discounts along the way! Learn more…

New Non-resident OHV Permit Requirements for 2023– Non-resident OHV Permits can only be purchased online. Utah also now requires all OHV operators to complete the Utah Off-Highway Vehicle Education Course online. Read more…

Moab Area Transit– The Moab Area Transit (MAT) pilot program is a new, fare-free, transit service in the City of Moab. Read more…

Winter in Moab


Welcome to Moab

Welcome to Moab, Utah, where Arches and Canyonlands National Parks are just a part of the breathtaking red rock landscapes that surround this stunning destination. Combining small-town hospitality with unparalleled natural beauty and the cool waters of the Colorado River, Moab has become one of the most sought-after destinations in the American Southwest.

As you explore the unique scenery of Moab, take time to relax and enjoy the welcoming hospitality of this charming resort town. Thanks to its perfect climate, Moab attracts year-round outdoor events and festivals, while the downtown business district has responded with an array of restaurants, microbreweries, shops, and galleries. Whether you’re in the mood for regional southwestern cuisine or world-class gourmet fare, Moab’s diverse culinary scene is sure to satisfy any palate. And for those looking for a souvenir to remember their visit, the downtown shops offer a great selection of southwestern arts and jewelry, t-shirts, and much more to browse through at your leisure.


  • Recent Posts

    • Exploring St. Patrick’s Day in the Red Rock Wonderland of Moab, Utah
      Nestled amidst the iconic red rock formations of Utah lies Moab, a small town known for its breathtaking scenery and adventurous spirit. While St. Patrick’s Day might not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think of Moab. Join us as we embark on a journey to discover how Moab […]
    • Springtime Splendor in Moab, Utah!
      As winter loosens its grip, Moab awakens in a riot of color and adventure!  From thrilling outdoor escapades to serene moments in nature, here’s why Moab should be on your springtime bucket list:  Mild Temperatures:  Say goodbye to winter chills and hello to perfect hiking, biking, and […]
    • 98 Center Relaunches in Moab!
      Once upon a time along the Wasatch front in Salt Lake City, Utah, a couple of chefs became friends working at the Arie Sushi Bar at Snowbird Ski Resort.  They worked for years together in different kitchens and shared an inspiration for Asian cuisine.   They were both into skiing and snowboarding […]
    • In The Dirt Film Screening in Moab
      IN THE DIRT is a documentary film about a group of passionate Native American cyclists who attempt to bring the sport of mountain biking to the Navajo Nation, where no bike shops exist. In 2018, retired pro cyclist Scott Nydam and his family moved to Gallup, New Mexico to pursue a healthcare job […]
    • First Annual Moab Spring Spruce-Up: April 12-13
      Trail Mix invites the public to participate in the Moab Spring Spruce-Up inaugural volunteer event held to maintain, build, and clean up non-motorized trails and other highly-impacted areas in Grand County to help offset impacts in the 2024 season. Volunteers will be working on equestrian, hiking, […]
    • The Season Starts in Moab!
      Your Ultimate Guide to Moab’s Outdoor Festivals and Spring Events Embark on a journey through the exhilarating outdoor festivals and spring events nestled in the heart of Moab, Utah. From adrenaline-pumping adventures to serene explorations of nature, Moab offers something for every outdoor […]
    • Tourism Day on the Hill 2024
      Every year, the Utah State Capitol comes alive with the buzz of excitement as industry professionals gather for Tourism Day on the Hill, an annual event hosted by the Utah Tourism Industry Association. This year, on Friday, February 9th, Grand County Economic Development Director Ben Fredregill and […]
  • Upcoming Events

    1. Tuesdays: Archeology Station: Interpreting Potsherds

      April 2 @ 11:00 am - May 14 @ 2:00 pm
    2. Annual Membership Gala

      April 24 @ 6:00 pm - 8:30 pm
    3. Moab Rotary Car Show & Rod Run

      April 26 - April 28
    4. Thelma and Louise Marathon, Half Marathon, 15K, and Marathon Team Race

      April 27
    5. TransRockies Gran Fondo Moab

      May 4
    6. Raptors on the Rocks (4X4 Off-road Event)

      May 9 - May 12

Discover Nature’s Masterpiece

Moab’s iconic national parks, Arches and Canyonlands, are just the beginning. Surrounding the town are diverse natural wonders—rivers, forests, and Bureau of Land Management land—all waiting to be explored. Even the smallest desert pothole in Moab is home to unique creatures vital to the ecosystem. Pause to reflect on the intricate balance of life during your exploration. Whether you’re a naturalist or an outdoor enthusiast, there’s always more to discover in Moab’s desert ecosystem. Immerse yourself in its wonders, taking a deep breath and appreciating Nature’s Masterpiece.

We invite you to check out our constantly expanding series of science and nature videos, which showcase the fragile beauty of Moab’s desert landscape and lesser-known experiences.


Moab Information Center

Moab Information Center
25 E Center St (Corner of Main and Center Streets)
7 Days/Week
9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas

Once you arrive in Moab, your first stop should be the Moab Information Center (MIC). Conveniently located at the corner of Main and Center Street in Moab, the MIC offers information on recreational opportunities and visitor services throughout southeastern Utah. Allow some time for the interpretive displays and large gift shop featuring guide books, maps, videos, videos, postcards, and much more.

Moab to Monument Valley Film Commission

Moab to Monument Valley Film Commission

Become a part of southeastern Utah’s rich film history and choose this stunning location for your next project!

The Moab to Monument Valley Film Commission holds the title of the longest running film commission in the world. Established 1949. We are here to facilitate whatever your production needs may be!

Utah’s competitive incentive program offers a fully refundable tax credit of up to 25% on in-state spend, which helps you cut production costs without sacrificing quality.

FILMMOAB.COM | 435-260-0097


Join us at the Moab Museum on Saturday, February 17th for the free public exhibition opening of A Moab Prison Camp: Japanese American Incarceration in Grand County. From 10 am-2 pm, we will be hosting a Scan and Share event in the Museum gallery. Staff from the Utah Historical Society will be here in the Museum’s galleries to help gather stories or artifacts related to the Moab Isolation Center at Dalton Wells where Japanese Americans were incarcerated during WWII.

About the Exhibition:

A Moab Prison Camp: Japanese American Incarceration in Grand County introduces the local and national story of Japanese American incarceration during WWII. Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 authorizing the wartime incarceration of over 120,000 Japanese Americans, a majority of whom were US Citizens, in detention facilities across the country. The Moab Isolation Center, located north of Moab at Dalton Wells, played a brief but significant role in the web of Japanese American incarceration facilities: a former Civilian Conservation Corps camp was transformed into a temporary prison camp for so-called “troublemakers” from other camps. In this exhibit, a tale of injustice and resilience unfolds via stories and objects, introducing the national context with Smithsonian’s Righting a Wrong poster exhibition and research conducted by Utah State Parks.

This exhibit unpacks the nuanced terminology used during that era and following, inviting visitors to confront the usage of words like “relocation” versus “incarceration” and wrestle with the gravity of terms such as “concentration camp.” Through compelling narratives curated collaboratively with descendants and partners, A Moab Prison Camp illuminates the resilience and resistance exhibited by those imprisoned in Moab. It offers a broader exploration of the Japanese-American experience during this tumultuous period in US history.


Join Museum staff & Utah State Parks staff to mark the opening of “A Moab Prison Camp: Japanese American Incarceration in Grand County” a new temporary exhibition at the Moab Museum. Doors open at 7 pm and Megan Blackwelder, Vice President of the Moab Museum Board of Trustees and Southeast Utah Regional Manager for the Utah Division of State Parks, will introduce the exhibit. About the Exhibition:

A Moab Prison Camp: Japanese American Incarceration in Grand County introduces the local and national story of Japanese American incarceration during WWII. Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 authorizing the wartime incarceration of over 120,000 Japanese Americans, a majority of whom were US Citizens, in detention facilities across the country. The Moab Isolation Center, located north of Moab at Dalton Wells, played a brief but significant role in the web of Japanese-American incarceration facilities: a former Civilian Conservation Corps camp was transformed into a temporary prison camp for so-called “troublemakers” from other camps. In this exhibit, a tale of injustice and resilience unfolds via stories and objects, introducing the national context with the Smithsonian’s Righting a Wrong poster exhibition and research conducted by Utah State Parks.

This exhibit unpacks the nuanced terminology used during that era and following, inviting visitors to confront the usage of words like “relocation” versus “incarceration” and wrestle with the gravity of terms such as “concentration camp.” Through compelling narratives curated collaboratively with descendants and partners, A Moab Prison Camp illuminates the resilience and resistance exhibited by those imprisoned in Moab. It offers a broader exploration of the Japanese-American experience during this tumultuous period in US history.


Moab Steward Business Training

Responsible Recreation Training for Moab Businesses

Grand County Economic Development is partnering with local businesses to help educate visitors about responsible recreation practices in the Moab area. From our iconic national parks, Arches and Canyonlands, to the vast expanse of public lands that extends well beyond these borders, the Moab area stands as a testament to the magnificence of Nature’s Masterpiece. Our rugged landscapes are a true treasure, yet they also reveal a surprising vulnerability. Even unassuming desert potholes cradle a vibrant array of creatures, each as exceptional as the grand landscape that envelopes them. The living biocrust that delicately covers our desert terrain stands as a cornerstone of a thriving ecosystem, deserving of our utmost care.

At the heart of the Moab Steward Business Training Program lies a mission to educate front-facing personnel about responsible and respectful recreation practices, and to empower them to impart this wisdom to the public. The program’s unwavering dedication to safeguarding our environment resonates strongly. They firmly believe that every individual possesses the capacity to contribute to a sustainable future for our planet. In this rallying call, they extend an open invitation to all Moab businesses, urging them to unite in the shared endeavor of preserving these natural marvels for generations to come.


Participation in the Program


Partnering businesses will receive:

  • Priority Placement on DiscoverMoab.com – Certified businesses will appear at the top of the business listings, along with a certification icon next to their listing.
  • Free Advertising on Social Media

Moab businesses can participate by:

  • Participating in the Moab Steward Business Training Program, which teaches public-facing staff about local responsible recreation practices and how to communicate them to the public. The training is 2 hours in the evening and offered on multiple dates.
  • Displaying educational signage in their business. Signage can be provided in different formats to suit your space and needs.

For more information contact Anna Sprout at asprout@grandcountyutah.net.

Prioritized Listing


Moab Area Transit

Moab’s New Fare-Free Transit System

The Moab Area Transit (MAT) pilot program is a new, fare-free, transit service in Moab. MAT provides residents and visitors with more options for day-to-day transportation in Moab. Transportation will be provided using comfortable MAT-branded 13-passenger vans.


ON-DEMAND TRANSIT

MAT includes an on-demand microtransit service providing door-to-door transportation to and from any location within the broader service area. Download the MAT app on your phone to schedule rides.

MAT On-Demand Microtransit Hours:

March 16 – October 15
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily
October 16 – March 15
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily

Moab Area Transit

MAIN STREET FIXED-ROUTE TRANSIT

MAT also includes a fixed-route service that will bring riders to predetermined destinations along Main Street. This route will provide regular stops between the Fairfield Inn north of town to the Utah State University Moab campus at Aggie Boulevard.

Moab Area Transit Map

Moab Area Transit

One goal of the fixed route is to reduce downtown traffic congestion by providing a transportation option that encourages visitors to leave their vehicles at their hotels and instead travel downtown for shopping and dining via the MAT 13-passenger vans. Residents are also invited to take advantage of the fixed-route service for quick travel along Moab’s Main Street.

MAT Fixed-Route Hours:

March 16 – October 15
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily
October 16 – March 15
No fixed-route service

MOAB AREA TRANSIT APP

Download the Moab Area Transit app to easily:

  • Locate the fixed route stops and see where the fixed route shuttle is on its route.
  • Visualize the on-demand microtransit service area and schedule a pickup and dropoff within the boundaries.

Moab Area Transit App

Download the MAT App by visiting your favorite app store or by scanning the QR Code above.

For more info or to request a ride by phone call 1-833-628-3733.



Be Prepared For Moab

Introduction

Moab’s wilderness environs are undeniably beautiful, but they can also be incredibly unforgiving. With scorching temperatures, rough terrain, and extreme remoteness, coupled with the danger of underestimating supplies and overestimating abilities, many visitors have unfortunately found themselves in precarious situations. Even the most diligent precautions may not always be enough when faced with the unpredictable nature of the desert.

Fortunately, the Grand County Search and Rescue (GCSAR) team is comprised of a highly trained group of compassionate and professional volunteers. They have formed specialized units to tackle the diverse rescue challenges presented by the rugged canyon country surrounding Moab. The GCSAR team undergoes extensive general training, as well as additional training for their specialized units, to ensure that they are always ready to perform at their best during what may be the worst times for those in need.

How NOT to Get Rescued in Moab

Drink Water
Use a Map

Tips from Grand County Search and Rescue

Preparation Is The Key! If you would like to minimize your chances of requiring emergency assistance, here are a few things you can do.

Take clothing layers for extreme temperature changes
Be prepared for temperature extremes. At certain times of the year, it can get cold almost instantly at sunset. Even if you do not plan to be out after dark, take insulating clothing and gear that will help you survive in case you happen to get off the trail or are delayed for any reason. In colder months, take a jacket and/or windbreaker, a hat, gloves, proper footwear, a reflective emergency blanket, etc. Clothing is just as important during the hotter months. A lightweight, long-sleeve shirt and a hat can help you stay cool. Carry sunglasses and sunscreen too.

Take LOTS of water
If you think you have enough water, you probably don’t. Take more. A basic rule of thumb is a gallon per person per day. You may need even more, depending on the time of year. You may only plan to be out for a few hours, but plan on the unplanned. Take extra water. Electrolyte replacement is also essential, so take powdered or liquid electrolytes or something salty.

Take food
Adventure requires energy. Maintain your energy levels with adequate food. Salty foods such as trail mix or energy bars are good choices.

Tell someone where you are going and when you expect to be back
Do not change your itinerary without updating this person. The first place we will look if you are reported overdue is on the trail that you are supposed to be on.

Know your location
Research and study your planned route. Know how to navigate with a good map and compass and/or a GPS. Practice with each. Do not rely on cell phone or tablet navigation apps that require cell service to function. Cell service is notoriously bad in many areas of Grand County. If you do become lost or disoriented, don’t compound the problem by trying to get un-lost. Stay where you are.

Know your skill and fitness level
Check guidebooks for typical riding and hiking times. Then to be safe, double those times. While some experts may be able to do a certain trail in 3 hours, most people might require 6 or 7 hours to do the same trail. Be honest in assessing your skill and fitness levels. Some of Grand County’s trails can be extremely difficult, even for experts.

Take a light
Even if you plan to be back well before dark, take a headlamp or flashlight and extra batteries. Once it gets dark, do not attempt to travel without illumination. The consequences could be deadly.

Take a fire starter
Carry the means to start and sustain an emergency fire. There are many ways to start a fire. Carry a lighter, waterproof matches, or some type of fire starting kit. A knife can aid in carving kindling.

Take a cell phone
Even though cell service is a hit-and-miss proposition in this area, cell phones have helped Grand County Search and Rescue (GCSAR) save numerous lives. Make sure your battery is fully charged and leave the phone off unless absolutely necessary. If you call 911, we should automatically get coordinates for your location if you stay on the phone for about a minute. Sometimes, texting can work in areas where voice service does not. If you are unable to connect via 911, try texting a friend to call 911. Cell phones usually work if you are up on a mesa, but do not work well down in the canyons.

Carry first aid supplies
Accidents happen. Be prepared with at least a basic first aid kit that contains different types of bandages and gauze, adhesive tape, and a method to cleanse a wound.

Know the Weather
Check the forecast before you go out. Pay attention to the weather during the day. In summer months, recreate during the cooler hours earlier or later in the day. Watch for lightning and listen for thunder, especially during Monsoon Season (July through September.) Avoid slot canyons and drainages when thunderstorms are in the area or even miles up the drainage. If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you. During the winter, avalanche danger in the La Sal Mountains can be extreme. Check the forecast before venturing out: utahavalanchecenter.org/advisory/moab

Wear a Life Jacket
If you are swimming or boating, wear a Personal Flotation Device (PFD). The Colorado and Green Rivers can appear deceptively calm. Visitors have been caught in strong and invisible undercurrents near shorelines and pulled farther out into the river than they originally planned to swim. NEVER try to swim across the river without a PFD. It’s wider than it looks.

Camping Regulations

Know Local Camping Regulations

Within 20 miles of Moab, camping is only allowed in developed campgrounds. A list of developed campgrounds is available here.

Dispersed (Primitive) camping is available in a few areas outside of Moab. Click here for a map of allowed areas. The following regulations apply to all primitive sites: