Moab Information Center

Welcome to Moab

Once you arrive in Moab, your first stop should be the Moab Information Center (MIC). Conveniently located at the corner of Main and Center Street in Moab, the MIC offers information on recreational opportunities and visitor services throughout southeastern Utah. Allow some time for the interpretive displays and large gift shop featuring guide books, maps, videos, videos, postcards, and much more.

 
  • Information about recreation opportunities in southeastern Utah
  • Current weather and road information
  • Information about hotels, restaurants, tours operators, shuttles, and other services for travelers
  • Interpretive displays
  • Gift shop featuring guide books, maps, videos, CD-ROMs, postcards, and much more
  • Free WiFi
  • Clean restrooms

Experience the stunning new film, “Welcome to Moab”, in the MIC’s 4K Ultra HD Theater

 

“Welcome to Moab” is an immersive 4K theater film that provides visitors with an outstanding overview of the public lands and diverse activities possible around Moab, Utah. Produced in 2017, the film combines impressive ultra-high-definition 4K footage, time lapse photography, and aerial perspectives of the ruggedly spectacular public lands that surround Moab. Watching this 20 minute film at the beginning of your visit will provide the best possible orientation for visiting this spectacular part of the world. The film is repeated throughout the day at the Moab Information Center.

You don’t have to wait until you get to Moab to watch the new “Welcome to Moab” film. The film is now available on Blu-ray & DVD! In addition to a great overview of all there is to see and do in the Moab area, the disc also includes:
  • Canyonlands by Air
  • Arches Winter’s Day
  • Moab Jeep Tour
  • Moab Mountain Biking
Click here to order your copy today.

MIC Lecture Series – From April to November each year, the Lecture Series presents talks by regional experts about the Moab region’s fascinating past and present, places and people, wildlife, plants, dinosaurs and more! Talks generally begin at 6:00 P.M. and are FREE to the public. Lectures are co-sponsored by the Museum of Moab. The Moab Information Center (MIC) is conveniently located on the corner of Main & Center Streets. For the latest schedule click here.

Canyonlands Natural History Association – If you need to purchase information prior to your visit, many of the guidebooks and maps for sale in the Moab Information Center are available from the Canyonlands Natural History Association. Visit their website at: www.cnha.org

Address:
Moab Information Center 25 E Center Street Moab, UT 84532
Hours:
Mon-Sat: 8:00am – 7:00pm
Sun: 9:00am — 6:00pm
Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas
Location:


Arches National Park

Arches National Park

The world’s largest concentration of natural sandstone arches.

Introduction

Located just 5 miles (8 km) north of Moab is Arches National Park, which contains the world’s largest concentration of natural sandstone arches. Although over 2,000 arches are located within the park’s 76,518 acres, the park also contains an astounding variety of other geological formations. Colossal sandstone fins, massive balanced rocks, soaring pinnacles and spires dwarf visitors as they explore the park’s viewpoints and hiking trails. A paved scenic drive takes visitors to many of the major viewpoints within the park. The park’s rock formations delight children as well as adults, with many easy trails providing opportunities for kids to get out of the car and explore the arches up close. Hikers can choose from a wide variety of trails, from short twenty minute walks leading right up to many of the largest arches in the park, to more adventurous hikes into lesser seen areas.
Distance from Moab
5 miles (8km)
Directions from Moab
The entrance of Arches is located 5 miles (8km) north of Moab, along highway 191.
Park Hours
Open year-round, 24 hours/day
Entrance Fee
$30/vehicle – Good for 7 days (Subject to change)
Visitor Center & Hours
The visitor center includes interactive exhibits, educational kiosks, a 150-seat auditorium, and a bookstore featuring guide books, maps, DVD’s, postcards, and much more. The park is open 24 hours/day, 365 days/year; however the visitor center hours vary by season. (435) 719-2299

MAP

WEBCAM 1

WEBCAM 2

Winter Sunset at Delicate Arch
The Three Gossips at Arches National Park
Arches National Park

Suggested Activities

A Few Hours
Drive the 36 mile (58km) round trip Scenic Drive.
1/2 Day
Drive the Scenic Drive and hike some of the easy short trails in the park, such as the Park Avenue Trail and trails in the Windows Section of the park.
Full Day

Drive the Scenic Drive and hike some of the longer trails in the park, such as the trails to Double O Arch, Tower Arch, Delicate Arch, and Landscape Arch.
Several Days
Hikers can experience a wide variety of hiking trails, including some of the lesser-seen, yet equally spectacular areas of the park such as the “Primitive Loop” in the Devil’s Garden section of the park.

Camping

The Devils Garden Campground is located eighteen miles from the park entrance and is open year-round. Facilities include potable water, picnic tables, grills, as well as both pit-style and flush toilets. There are no showers. Bring your own wood or charcoal for the grills. Some sites will accommodate RVs up to 30 feet in length.Telephone and on-line reservations for both group and individual sites may be made through recreation.gov. Reservations are not accepted by the park, and the park does not maintain information about site availability.

  • Individual Sites: You can reserve standard campsites up to 6 months in advance for stays March 1-October 31. All sites are usually reserved months in advance. Between November 1 and February 28, sites are first-come, first-served. Facilities include drinking water, picnic tables, grills, and both pit-style and flush toilets. You can reserve campsites for nights between March 1 and October 31. Between November 1 and February 28, all sites are first-come, first served. Phone and online reservations for both group and individual sites must be made through recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. You can make reservations for standard sites no fewer than four days and no more than 6 months in advance. The fee per night for an individual Devils Garden campsite i $25. Group size is limited to 10 people and 2 vehicles.
  • Group Sites: Group sites can be reserved up to 12 months in advance. The campground has two sites for groups of 11 or more people. Juniper Basin campsite accommodates up to 55 people and is available March 1 to October 31; Canyon Wren campsite accommodates up to 35 and may be reserved year-round. No RVs or trailers are permitted in the group sites.
Campsites are usually reserved months in advance during the busy season (March-October). If you have not reserved a site prior to arrival at the park during these months, plan on utilizing other camping options in the Moab area. There are no services inside Arches National Park. The nearest place to get food, gas, and supplies is Moab, approximately 45-60 minutes’ drive from the campground.

Park Highlights

Delicate Arch in Arches National Park

Delicate Arch

Delicate Arch

People come from all over the world to visit Arches National Park, and visiting Delicate Arch is on the top of many visitors’ to-do lists. In a park with over 2,000 stone arches, this particular free-standing arch has become a widely recognized symbol of the state of Utah and one of the most famous geologic features in the world. The light opening beneath the arch is 46 feet high and 32 feet wide, making it the largest free-standing arch in the park.

Balanced Rock in Arches National Park

Balanced Rock

Balanced Rock

A short paved trail leads visitors to the base of Balanced Rock. The landform’s total height is 128 feet, with the huge balanced rock rising 55 feet above its base.

Landscape Arch in Arches National Park

Landscape Arch

Landscape Arch

The longest natural rock span in the world, this arch’s opening is 306 feet wide – 6 feet longer than a football field. A nine story building would easily fit beneath this thin span. In 1991, a massive slab of rock fell from its underside, resulting in an even thinner ribbon of rock.

Wildflowers in Arches National Park

Spring Wildflowers

Spring Wildflowers

April and May bring a variety of desert wildflowers to Arches.

Double Arch in Arches National Park

Double Arch

Double Arch

Located in the Windows Section of Arches National Park, Double Arch was used as a backdrop for portions of the 1988 movie “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade”. Numerous other movies have been filmed in Arches National Park, including Thelma and Louise in 1991.

Park Avenue Trail in Arches National Park

Park Avenue

Park Avenue

From Park Avenue parking area, the trail descends steeply into a spectacular canyon and continues down the wash to Courthouse Towers. If you have a shuttle driver, you can begin at one point and be picked up at the other. For round-trip hiking, retrace your steps along the trail rather than walk along the park road.

Arches National Park in Winter

Arches in Winter

Arches in Winter

Winter brings a blanket of pristine snow to Arches, providing dramatic contrast to the surrounding red rocks.

Hiking in Arches National Park

Family Hiking

Family Hiking

There are many family friendly hikes in Arches, including the hike to Turret Arch in the Windows Section.

Biological Soil Crust

Help to keep all of our trails open. Protect this fragile, but crucial, soil by remaining on designated roads, routes and trails at all times.

Biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, is the foundation of desert plant life. This black, knobby crust is made up of many different living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the desert ecosystem. However, this sensitive soil is extremely fragile and can take decades to grow. Even a footstep can damage the crust for decades, having lasting impacts on the desert environment. Please stay on the trials. Help to protect this fragile life by remaining on designated roads, routes, and trails at all times. Where hiking trails are not established, hike in sandy washes or on bare rock.

Hiking

One of the more rewarding ways to see the park is on foot. Arches features a wide variety of hikes, from short 10 minute walks (suitable for all ages) to 4 hour hikes into some of the remote sections of the park.

Easy Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Balanced Rock

0.3 mi (0.5 km) Round Trip

15-30 min

A loop trail around the base of a fragile, picturesque rock formation.

Broken Arch

1.2 mi (2 km) Round Trip or 2 mi (3.2 km) with loop

30-60 min

From the Sand Dune Arch parking area, the trail cuts across a large meadow to the arch and continues to the campground. Loop trail leads through fin canyons with sand dunes and slickrock.

Delicate Arch Viewpoint

100 yards (91 meters) round trip

10-15 min

In addition to the short accessible trail, another (moderately strenuous) hiking trail climbs one-half mile (0.8 km) toward Delicate Arch and ends at the rim of a steep canyon that separates the viewpoint from the arch. (This is not the popular trail to Delicate Arch, which starts at the Wolfe Ranch parking area. See below.)

Desert Nature Trail

0.2 mi (0.3 km) round trip

15-30 min

Discover the adaptations of plants and animals in the desert on a self-guided nature walk. Trail guide available at the trailhead near the Visitor Center.

Double Arch

0.5 mi (0.8 km) round trip

15-30 min

A relatively flat, sandy trail leads to the base of two giant arch spans which are joined at one end.

Landscape Arch

2 mi (3.2 km) round trip

30-60 min

A relatively flat, gravel-surfaced trail leads to a spectacular ribbon of rock, whose span is more than a football field in length. Short side trips to Tunnel and Pine Tree Arches.

Sand Dune Arch

0.4 mi (0.6 km) round trip

15-30 min

Trail leads through deep sand to a secluded arch among sandstone fins. Kids love the sand!

Skyline Arch

0.4 mi (0.6 km) round trip

10-20 min

A short hike on a flat, well-defined trail.

The Windows

1 mi (1.6 km) round trip

30-60 min

A gentle climb up a gravel loop trail leads to three massive arches (North and South Windows and Turret Arch). An alternate return, slightly longer, is by way of the primitive loop around the back of the two Windows. The primitive loop trail starts at the South Window viewpoint.

Moderate Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Park Avenue

1 mi (1.6 km) one way

30-60 min

From Park Avenue parking area, the trail descends steeply into a spectacular canyon and continues down the wash to the Courthouse Towers parking area. If you have a shuttle driver, you can begin at one parking area and be picked up at the other. For round-trip hiking, retrace your steps along the trail.

Tower Arch

3.4 mi (5.6 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

The trail climbs a steep, but short, rock wall, then cuts across a valley and then meanders through sandstone fins and sand dunes. An alternate, shorter trail (0.3 mile [0.4 km] one way), begins at the end of the four-wheel-drive road on the west side of Tower Arch. This unpaved road washes out quickly in rainstorms; inquire at the visitor center about road conditions before heading out.

Difficult Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Devils Garden Primitive Loop

7.2 mi (11.5 km) round trip

3-5 hrs

Longest of the maintained trails in the park, the Devils Garden Trail leads to eight awe-inspiring arches. Expect narrow ledges with rocky surface hiking and scrambling on slickrock. Not recommended when rock is wet or snowy.

Double O Arch

4 mi (6.4 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

Beyond Landscape Arch, the trail becomes more challenging as it climbs over sandstone slabs; footing is rocky; there are narrow ledges with exposure to heights. Spur trails lead to Partition and Navajo Arches. Dark Angel is one-half mile (0.8 km) farther. Trail guide available at trailhead.

Delicate Arch

3 mi (4.8 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

Take at least 1 quart (1 liter) of water per person! There is no shade. Open slickrock with some exposure to heights. The first half-mile is a wide, well-defined trail. Upon reaching the slickrock, follow the rock cairns. The trail climbs gradually and levels out toward the top of this rock face. Just before you get to Delicate Arch, the trail goes along a rock ledge for about 200 yards. Elevation change: 480 feet (146 meters)

Electronic Bicycles (e-bikes)

On August 30, 2019 the National Park Service announced a new electric bicycle (e-bike) policy for national parks, expanding recreational opportunities and accessibility. The policy supports Secretary’s Order 3376, signed by U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt on August 29, 2019, that directs Department of the Interior (DOI) bureaus to create a clear and consistent e-bike policy on all federal lands managed by the Department.

Beginning October 1, 2019, visitors to Southeast Utah Group parks (Arches and Canyonlands national parks and Hovenweep and Natural Bridges national monuments) will be allowed to use e-bikes where traditional bicycles are allowed. Bicycles and e-bikes are allowed on paved and unpaved roads that are open to the public. Bicycles and e-bikes are not allowed on any trails in the parks.

There are no charging stations in the parks. Generators are not allowed in the backcountry. This change in e-bike policy applies to private and commercial use in the parks.

The National Park Service announcement and the agency’s new e-bike policy are available online at www.nps.gov/orgs/1207/ebikepolicy.htm.

Commercial Tours

The following Moab companies offer commercial tours in Arches National Park:

Business

Phone

Type of Tour

Adrift Adventures

435-259-8594

Van/bus tours departing 3 times per day, full & half day backcountry 4×4 tours

Canyonlands Field Institute

800-860-5262

Sunset tour with short hikes

Deep Desert Expeditions

435-259-1565

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Desert Highlights

435-259-4433

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Dreamride

435-259-6419

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Hike Moab

208-290-4781

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Moab Adventure Center

888-622-4097

Arches bus tours

Navtec Expeditions

800-833-1278

Front and back country tours available

Plateau Restoration

435-259-7733

Van tour with optional hikes

Red Rock Express

800-259-2869

Front country scenic tours

Tom Till Tours

435-259-5327

Photography tours in Arches and Canyonlands

Windgate Adventures

435-260-9802

Photography tours in Arches and Canyonlands

Photography

Arches National Park is a paradise for photographers. Under conditions of constantly changing light, the red rock landscape provides limitless photographic opportunities. Often, the difference between an average photograph and an exceptional photograph is good lighting. Low sun angles at sunrise and sunset can add brilliant color to the red rock. Scattered clouds can also add depth to an image and a passing storm can provide extremely dramatic lighting.
Canyonlands Photography Canyonlands Photography
Canyonlands Photography Canyonlands Photography

Photographing Delicate Arch

Over one million people visit Arches National Park every year, and just about everyone wants to see all of the major views within the park. One of the most heavily visited arches is Delicate Arch. As a result of its popularity, you should always expect to see people surrounding this world famous arch. Although it may occasionally happen, it is unrealistic to expect a solitary experience around Delicate Arch. Be courteous to other visitors during your visit to the arch, and do not expect people to move away from this world famous landmark during your photographs. Remember that not everyone who visits this arch is a photographer. Most people simply want to experience the joy of standing next to such a beautiful landmark. People can add scale to any photo of Delicate Arch, so make your visit a great shared experience for everyone involved. Delicate Arch Photographers

Try not to limit your creativity by simply capturing images of iconic places using the same composition as countless photographers before you. Arches National Park contains thousands of arches and vast expanses of breathtaking scenery just waiting for you to introduce your own personal style and interpretation. For those seeking solitude, Arches has much to offer beyond its iconic places. For example, consider a hike to Double O Arch, returning via the Primitive Trail, for some of the most spectacular scenery in the park. Just remember to bring enough memory cards to capture all of the great views!

Best Times / Locations to Photograph

Early Morning Late Afternoon
Moab Fault Park Avenue
The Three Gossips Courthouse Towers
Sheep Rock Petrified Dunes
The Great Wall Balanced Rock
Turret Arch The Garden of Eden
The Spectacles North and South Windows
Double Arch Delicate Arch (at end of main trail)
Cache Valley Fiery Furnace
Wolfe Ranch Skyline Arch
Landscape Arch Fins in Devil Garden
Double O Arch Tower Arch
Fiery Furnace in Arches National Park


Kid Fun in Canyonlands National Park

Kid Friendly Hiking

Both Island in the Sky and the Needles have several short trails great for children. At the Island, kids enjoy peeking through Mesa Arch and climbing the back of the whale at Whale Roc.

Island in the Sky District

Mesa Arch

Length: 0.5mi / 0.8km round trip

Whale Rock Trail

Length: 1 mile round trip

Difficulty: Easy

Whale Rock 1.0mi / 1.5km 1hour 100ft / 30m Bare Slickrock – Good views.

Whale Rock is a rounded, eroded sandstone fin that is fun to climb. Handrails are provided to help people reach the top, where you are rewarded with impressive views out over Upheaval Dome.

Trailhead
The trailhead is located near the end of the Upheaval Dome Road, in the Island in the Ski District of Canyonlands National Park. From the trailhead you can see the rock, which does somewhat resemble a beached whale.

Base of Whale Rock
Follow the wide, sandy trail to the eastern edge of Whale Rock. From there you will see the recommended route up the rock, using the handrails. You’ll also see that people have walked along the base of the rock, looking for spots where they can climb to the top.

Viewpoint on Rock
The rock is rounded, but it is easy to walk along the top. The best views are found about half-way along the rock, but you can continue along the top to the western edge. When you are ready to return, just retrace your steps back to the trailhead.

Upheaval Dome Overlook

Length: 1.6 mile round-trip, Elevation gain: 50ft / 15m

Time: 30 minutes round trip

Difficulty: Easy

Description: Upheaval Dome is a geographic oddity, an anticline where rocks have been pushed up and then eroded to produce interesting strata. Surrounding the dome is a downwarp in the rock layers, a feature called a syncline. The overlook provides a spectacular view of these interesting features.

Trailhead
The trailhead is located at the end of the Upheaval Dome Road, in the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park. The trail is wide and easy to follow.

First Overlook
It is an easy 0.3 mile hike to a vista overlooking the dome. The views are impressive, but an even better view can be had by following the trail along the rim to a Second Overlook.

Second Overlook
The second overlook is about 0.5 miles farther along the rim. From either viewpoint, just hike back the way you came to your vehicle at the trailhead parking area.

Needles District

Cave Spring

Length: 0.6 miles round trip

Difficulty: Easy

Description: This short, easy hike provides great scenery plus glimpses into the past, as you view a historic cowboy camp and also prehistoric Native American rock art. The trail is wide and easy, but you do have to climb 2 wooden ladders placed to make it easy to get up cliffs.

Trailhead
This hike is in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park. To find the trailhead follow the main road (Route 211) into the Needles area. As you enter the park, just past the visitors center, the road forks. Stay left and follow the signs to the trailhead.

In the early 1900s, this area was a popular range for sheep and cattle. A large camp was established here, next to a reliable spring, to accommodate the cowboys. Cooking and most activities were performed outside and many relics remain, including Dutch ovens, fry pans, tables and other implements. The camp is set against a rock, which alcoves where cowboys slept. The spring bubbles from the ground in the last alcove. Ancient pictographs can be seen on a blackened wall in this alcove.

Hiking Loop
If you hike in a clockwise direction, the cowboy camp is just a few hundred feet from the trailhead. From the camp, you can continue a loop hike back to the trailhead. Wooden ladders allow easy access to the slickrock above the camp. From there you will have extraordinary views out over the surrounding countryside.

Pothole Point Trail

Length: 0.6 miles round trip

Difficulty: Easy

Pothole Point is another popular hike, especially if the potholes are full of water and the creatures that live in these small ecosystems.

Description: This trail loops around an area of slickrock where there are numerous potholes. These basins in the sandstone retain water after storms. The trail offers great views of The Needles in the distance. Incredible photos can be taken with the canyonlands scenery reflected off the glassy surface of water in the potholes.

Trailhead
The trailhead is located along the Big Spring Overlook road in the Needles District of Canyonlands National Park, near the end of the road. Visitors can hike along the established trail, or just poke around the slickrock. The official hike is short and easy, but you may want to wander a bit and play on the rock.

CAUTION: You do need to be attentive when hiking with kids in Canyonlands as there are unfenced overlooks throughout the park.

Junior Ranger Program

There are a few ways to earn a Junior Ranger badge at Canyonlands. Free Junior Ranger booklets are available at park visitor centers. Filled with fun activities, these books reveal the wonders of Canyonlands to kids and parents alike. After completing certain exercises, participants earn a Junior Ranger badge and signed certificate. Activities are designed for ages 5 and up.

At the Island in the Sky, you may also earn a badge for attending a Family Program (in season) or completing three activities from the Explorer Pack

Family Programs

At the Island in the Sky, everyone in the family can get involved with fun, hands-on activities about nature. Kids who participate can earn a sticker or work toward a Junior Ranger badge. Activities are offered daily from June through August; check at the Visitor Center for a schedule.

Explorer Packs

Both the Island in the Sky and Needles districts offer a unique tool for kids eager to explore and learn about the area: Explorer Packs. These packs contain many useful items, including binoculars, a hand lens, a naturalist guide and a notebook. Before you set out for the day, stop by the visitor center and check one out (deposit required).


Dead Horse Point State Park

The view from Dead Horse Point is one of the most photographed scenic vistas in the world.

Introduction

32 miles (51.5 km) from Moab, Dead Horse Point State Park is one of Utah’s most spectacular state parks. The view from Dead Horse Point is one of the most photographed scenic vistas in the world. Towering 2,000 feet above the Colorado River, the overlook provides a breathtaking panorama of Canyonlands’ sculpted pinnacles and buttes. Millions of years of geologic activity created the spectacular views from Dead Horse Point State Park. Deposition of sediments by ancient oceans, freshwater lakes, streams and wind blown sand dunes created the rock layers of canyon country. Igneous activity formed the high mountains that rise like cool blue islands from the desert below.

The legend of Dead Horse Point states that around the turn of the century the point was used as a corral for wild mustangs roaming the mesa top. Cowboys herded them across the narrow neck of land and onto the point. The neck was then fenced off with branches and brush. One time, for some unknown reason, horses were left corralled on the waterless point where they died of thirst within view of the Colorado River 2,000 feet below.

There are miles of pet-friendly developed hiking trails in the park, including a paved trail which provides easy access to some of the most scenic views. Mountain Bikers will love the new Intrepid Trail System at Dead Horse Point. With slickrock sections, looping singletrack, sandy washes, and incredible scenery, the Intrepid Trail System provides a great taste of what Moab mountain biking is all about. This is the perfect ride for families and offers spectacular views of the Colorado River and Canyonlands National Park.

Distance from Moab
32 Miles (51.5 km)
Directions from Moab
Drive 9 miles (14.5 km) northwest of Moab on US 191 and then 23 miles (37 km) southwest on Utah 313. Driving time to the visitor center from Moab is roughly 45 minutes.
Park Hours
Park open year-round, 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. – Visitor Center open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. year round, closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Years Day.
Fees
Day Use fees (valid for 3 consecutive days starting from the date of purchase):
  • $20 per vehicle (up to 8 passengers)
  • $15 for Utah Seniors (Utah residents 62 or over)
  • $10 per motorcycle
  • $4 pedestrian or cyclist (biking into park)
  • Commercial day-use fee: $4 per person
Visitors Center and Hours
The visitor center is open year-round, has facilities for the disabled, an information area, exhibits, rest rooms, water, publications and souvenirs. The visitor center hours open from 9am-5pm year round, closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Years Day.(435) 259-2614

Kayenta and Windgate Campgrounds

Nestled within a grove of juniper, the Kayenta Campground at Dead Horse Point State Park offers a peaceful, shaded respite from the surrounding desert. All twenty-one sites offer lighted shade structures, picnic tables, fire rings, and tent pads. All sites are also equipped with RV electrical hookups. Modern restroom facilities are available, and trails lead directly from the campground to various points of interest within the park. 21 sites/4 non-reservable/1 ADA accessible.

New in 2018, the Wingate Campground sits atop the mesa with far reaching views to the area’s mountain ranges and deep canyons. This campground contains thirty-one (31) campsites, twenty (20) of which have electrical hookups that support RV or tent campers while eleven (11) are walk-in, tent only sites. All sites have fire-pits, picnic tables under shade shelters, and access to bathrooms with running water and dish washing sinks. RV sites will accommodate vehicles up to 56′ and there is a dump station at the entrance to the campground. To make a camping reservation contact Reserve America at 1-800-322-3770, or visit reserveamerica.com.

Yurts

The nine yurts at Dead Horse Point State Park provide the most luxurious accommodations that can be found atop the mesa. A perfect location for experiencing sunrise and sunset, the yurts enjoy sweeping views of both the canyons to the south and the La Sal mountains to the east. A private spur of the Intrepid Trail System gives easy access to the otherwise remote Big Chief and Pyramid Canyon overlooks. Each yurt contains sleeping space for up to six people, in the form of bunked double beds and a pullout futon couch. An outdoor propane grill allows for cooking on site, with the park providing propane free of charge. Heat, air conditioning, and electrical outlets are available, and comfortable seating areas both indoors and outdoors provide for a relaxing environment in any weather condition. Modern restroom facilities are located within easy walking distance.

Please note that pets are not allowed in the yurts, or in vehicles outside of the yurts. If you would like to spend the night in the park with your furry friend, consider the Kayenta Campground.

To make a camping reservation contact Reserve America at 1-800-322-3770, or visit reserveamerica.com.

Camping Fees

  • Kayenta and Windgate campgrounds are $40 per night (RV Campsites) and $35 (Hike-in Only Campsites at Windgate). Maximum of 8 people per site.
  • Yurts: $140 per night year round, maximum of 6 people per site
  • Camping and yurt fees accommodate one vehicle. Extra vehicles are charged a $15 fee.
  • Reservations can be made four months in advance by calling 1-800-322-3770 or online at reserveamerica.com. First-come, first-served openings may be available at the park.
  • There are no water hookups for RV’s. Fill up your RVs in Moab.

Park Highlights

Pet Friendly Hiking Trails

Pet Friendly Hiking Trails

Eight miles of pet friendly hiking trails in the park include two joining loops around the rim and several spurs to beautiful viewpoints.

Mountain Biking

Mountain Biking

The Intrepid Trail System has three hiking and biking loops ranging from one to nine miles with varying degrees of difficulty.

Yurts

Yurts

Nine yurts are available for overnight use and are available by reservation. Open year-round.

Experience Dead Horse Point

Experience Dead Horse Point

Dead Horse Point’s combination of breathtaking scenery and easy accessibility has made it a must-see for visitors to the Moab area.

Night Skies

Dead Horse Point State Park, recognized as an International Dark Sky Park in 2016, is one of the most active and accessible areas to stargaze in the Moab area. Its high plateau location, mountains far in the distance and cities out of sight yields a nearly full view of celestial sphere. Park staff routinely provide programs celebrating the night sky, from walks under the full moon to gazing through telescopes at objects millions of light years away. Whether you want to enjoy by yourself or join a ranger, Dead Horse Point State Park is a premier spot to see the skies our ancestors wondered over and survived with.

Download Dead Horse Point State Park’s Dark Sky Brochure to learn more.

Biological Soil Crust

Help to keep all of our trails open. Protect this fragile, but crucial, soil by remaining on designated roads, routes and trails at all times.

Biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, is the foundation of desert plant life. This black, knobby crust is made up of many different living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the desert ecosystem. However, this sensitive soil is extremely fragile and can take decades to grow. Even a footstep can damage the crust for decades, having lasting impacts on the desert environment. Please stay on the trials. Help to protect this fragile life by remaining on designated roads, routes, and trails at all times. Where hiking trails are not established, hike in sandy washes or on bare rock.

Mountain Biking the Intrepid Trail

Overview
Deadhorse Point State Park, 32 miles west of Moab

Difficulty
Easy to Moderate

Length
Big Chief: 3.6 miles
Crossroads: 1.7 miles
Great Pyramid: 2.2 miles
Intrepid: 0.5 miles
Prickly Pair: 3.0 miles
Raven Roll: 1.7 miles
Twisted Tree: 1.5 miles
Whiptail: 2.6 miles

Elevation @ Trailhead
5900’

Season
Ideal in spring, fall and winter; midday heat in July and August

Directions
Nine miles northwest of Moab on US 191 and then 23 miles southwest on Utah 313 to the end of the highway.

Trail Description

With slickrock sections, looping singletrack, sandy washes, and incredible scenery, the Intrepid Trail System provides a great taste of what Moab mountain biking is all about. This is the perfect ride for families and offers spectacular views of the Colorado River and Canyonlands National Park.

The Intrepid Trail System has 8 segments totaling just over 16 miles of trail for mountain bikers and hikers to enjoy varying through degrees of intermediate difficulty. The eastern section of the trail is easier and often recommended for beginning riders in the Moab area, while the western loop is more challenging. The entirety of the system will offer opportunities for visitors of all ages and abilities, and provide breathtaking views. Unlike the hiking trails, pets are not welcome on the Intrepid Trail System for human, animal and environmental safety.

The Intrepid Trail was made possible through great public/private partnerships. Intrepid Potash, Inc., for which the trail is named, gave $20,000 for construction of a new single-track, non-motorized trail system. The trail was built by Trail Mix, a local volunteer organization, and volunteers from the Utah Conservation Corps, American Conservation Experience and Moab Trails Alliance. The National Park Service and Utah State Parks also worked on the project. Dead Horse Point State Park is located approximately 30 miles from Moab. The park also offers camping and day-use facilities, visitor center, and naturalist programs. For more information call (435) 259-2614.






Canyonlands National Park

The largest national park in Utah, with diversity that staggers the imagination.

Introduction

Canyonlands is the largest national park in Utah, and its diversity staggers the imagination. The easiest way to see the park is with a visit to the Island in the Sky district, only 32 miles (51.5 km) from Moab. The Island in the Sky offers many pullouts with spectacular views along the paved scenic drive. Hiking trails and four-wheel-drive roads access backcountry areas for day or overnight trips.

The Island in the Sky sits atop a massive 1500 foot mesa, quite literally an Island in the Sky. Twenty miles (32.2 km) of paved roads lead to many of the most spectacular views in Canyon Country. From these lofty viewpoints visitors can often see over 100 miles (161 km) in any given direction, resulting in panoramic views that encompass thousands of square miles of canyon country. Take a short day-hike or spend a relaxing late afternoon enjoying the sunset. Whether you have a few hours to spend or a few days, the Island in the Sky provides an unforgettable Canyon Country experience for the entire family.

Distance from Moab
32 miles (51.5km)
Directions from Moab
Take Highway 191 10 miles (16 km) north to Highway 313, and then drive southwest 22 miles (35 km). Driving time to the visitor center from Moab is roughly 40 minutes.
Park Hours
Open year-round, 24 hours/day
Entrance Fee
$30/vehicle – Good for 7 days (Subject to change)
Visitor Center & Hours
Canyonlands is open year-round, 24 hours a day, however the park visitor centers close for the winter. Call (435) 719-2313 for park information.

MAP

PARK WEBCAM

Camping

Willow Flat Campground

Island in the Sky Campground (Willow Flat) has 12 sites, first-come, first-served. The campground is open year-round. The spectacular Green River Overlook is nearby. Nightly camping fee is $15 per site. Sites fill quickly spring through fall. There are toilets, picnic tables, and fire rings in the campground. There are no hookups for RVs and no water at the campground. You can get drinking water outside the visitor center spring through fall.

In addition to the campground located within the park, there is a great selection of additional campgrounds in the surrounding area. Moab has many commercial campgrounds with RV hookups in addition to a huge assortment of BLM public campgrounds in extremely scenic locations. Click here for a complete list of all the camping options available in the Moab area.

Suggested Activities

A Few Hours
Drive the park’s 20 miles (32.2 km) of paved roads and enjoy the spectacular views. Sunrise and sunset are particularly beautiful times of day to enjoy these lofty panoramic views of canyon country.
1/2 Day
Drive the paved scenic drive and hike some of the shorter trails, such as the Mesa Arch or Upheaval Dome Trails. A recent theory suggests that Upheaval Dome was created by a meteor impact.
Full Day
Drive the paved scenic drive and hike some of the longer trails in the park, such as the 5 mile (8 km) round trip Neck Spring Trail. Those with high clearance/4WD vehicles can drive down the Shafer Trail to the White Rim and explore Musselman Arch, or drive all the way down to the Colorado River via Lathrop Canyon. Note that a Day Use Permit is required.
Several Days
Backpackers can experience the solitude of Canyonlands by hiking some of the trails from the mesa top to the White Rim (steep & strenuous) and spend the night in the backcountry. 4-wheel drive enthusiasts or mountain bikers may want to travel the 100 mile “White Rim Trail” which loops below the Island in the Sky mesa. Reservations for White Rim campsites and a Backcountry Permit is required.

Park Highlights

Green River Overlook

Green River Overlook

The Green River meanders beneath the Island in the Sky, as seen from the Green River Overlook. A paved walkway leads right up to the overlook.

Mesa Arch

Mesa Arch

A great hike for families with small children, the .5 mi (.8 km) round trip hike to Mesa Arch rewards visitors with a naturally framed view of canyon country.

Shafer Trail

Shafer Trail

The Shafer Trail descends from the Island in the Sky to the White Rim. A high clearance vehicle is strongly recommended. For current conditions check at the visitor center or call 435-259-4351.

Cataract Canyon

Cataract Canyon

Located in Canyonlands National Park, Cataract Canyon contains fourteen miles of rapids ranging in difficulty up to Class V.

Spring Wildflowers

Spring Wildflowers

Indian Paintbrush are just one of the many wildflowers that populate the Island in the Sky in the Spring (April-June).

Night Sky

Night Sky

Canyonlands National Park, which contains some of the darkest night skies in North America, is a popular destination for stargazers. Click here for the latest sunrise/sunset and moon phase information for Moab.

Biking

Biking

Canyonlands is famous for its mountain biking terrain, particularly for the 100-mile White Rim Road at the Island in the Sky. The Maze also offers some multi-day trip possibilities, though the logistics and roads are more difficult (for the support vehicles, not the bikes).

The Rivers

The Rivers

The Colorado and Green rivers wind through the heart of Canyonlands, cutting through layered sandstone to form two deep canyons. Both rivers are calm upstream of the Confluence, ideal for canoes, kayaks and other shallow water craft. Below the Confluence, the combined flow of both rivers spills down Cataract Canyon with remarkable speed and power, creating a world-class stretch of white water.

Biological Soil Crust

Help to keep all of our trails open. Protect this fragile, but crucial, soil by remaining on designated roads, routes and trails at all times.

Biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, is the foundation of desert plant life. This black, knobby crust is made up of many different living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the desert ecosystem. However, this sensitive soil is extremely fragile and can take decades to grow. Even a footstep can damage the crust for decades, having lasting impacts on the desert environment. Please stay on the trials. Help to protect this fragile life by remaining on designated roads, routes, and trails at all times. Where hiking trails are not established, hike in sandy washes or on bare rock.

Hiking

The Island in the Sky offers a wide variety of hiking trails ranging from short 30 minute walks on the mesa top, to overnight expeditions all the way down to the Colorado River.

Trails are marked with cairns (small rock piles). Please do not disturb existing cairns or build new ones. Signs are located at trailheads and intersections. All trails leading below the Mesa Top are primitive and rough; carry and know how to use a topographic map. No potable water is available along any of the hiking trails. During the warmest months always carry at least one gallon of water per person, per day.

Mesa Top – Easy Trails

Trail

Distance

Time

Elev. Change

Mesa Arch

0.5mi / 0.8km

30 minutes

100ft / 30m

Mornings are best – Beautiful Arch on cliff edge.

Murphy Point

1.3mi / 1.9km

1 hour

100ft / 30m

Panoramic view with Henry Mountains.

White Rim Overlook

1.5mi / 2.0km

1 hour

25ft / 8m

View of potholes & White Rim Road.

Grand View Point

2.0mi / 3.0km

1.5 hours

50ft / 15m

Panoramic view along cliff edge.

Mesa Top – Moderate Trails

Trail

Distance

Time

Elev. Change

Neck Spring

5.0mi / 8.0km

3 – 4 hours

300ft / 91m

Springs – Evidence of ranching

Aztec Butte

2.0mi / 3.0km

1.5 hours

225ft / 69m

Steep slickrock to top – Granaries.

Whale Rock

1.0mi / 1.5km

1 hour

100ft / 30m

Bare slickrock – Good views.

Upheaval Dome to Main Overlook

1.0mi / 1.5km

30 minutes

50ft / 15m

View into crater

Upheaval Dome to Second Overlook

2.0mi / 3.0km

45 minutes

200ft / 61m

View of crater & upheaval canyon

Mesa Top to White Rim – Steep & Strenuous Trails

Trail

Distance

Time

Elev. Change

Lathrop to White Rim Road

10mi / 16km

5- 7 hours

1600ft / 488m

Views of Colorado River & La Sal Mountains

Lathrop to Colorado River

17mi / 27km

Overnight

2000ft / 610m

River access – Cottonwoods

Murphy Loop

9mi / 14km

5 – 7 hours

1400ft / 427m

Panoramic view from hogback.

Gooseberry

6mi / 10km

4-6 Hours

1400ft/427m

Views of cliffs & La Sal Mountains.

Wilhite

10mi / 16km

6 – 8 hours

1600ft / 488m

Slot canyon across White Rim Road.

Alcove Spring

10mi / 16km

6 – 7 hours

1300ft / 396m

Large alcove, views of Taylor Canyon.

Syncline Loop

8mi / 13km

5 – 7 hours

1300ft / 396m

Canyon hiking – some shade.

Syncline Loop: Upheaval Crater Spur

3mi / 4km

2 hours

350ft / 107m

Some scrambling over rocks.

Syncline Loop: Upheaval Canyon Spur

6mi / 10km

2 – 3 hours

400ft / 122m

Sandy hike along wash bottom.

Biking

With hundreds of miles of four-wheel-drive roads, Canyonlands offers ideal terrain for multi-night mountain bike trips. Most groups travel with vehicle support to haul water and gear since there are few reliable water sources along these roads. For the truly adventurous, self-supported trips with panniers and trailers are also possible. Bikes must remain on designated roads: there are no single-track trails in the park.

Things to Know

  • Overnight Trips: You must have a permit for all overnight trips.
  • Day Trips: You must have a permit for day trips on White Rim, Elephant Hill, Lavender Canyon, and Peekaboo/Horse Canyon roads.
    Groups must camp in designated sites.
  • Reservations for White Rim campsites are very competitive. You may have to make a reservation up to four months in advance.
  • There are no shoulders or bike lanes. Be aware of passing vehicles.

Where Can I Ride My Bike?

You can ride a bicycle on any public roadway in the park. Some roads are better for cycling than others. Check at visitor centers for recommendations and road conditions.

Paved Roads

You can ride on paved roads at the Island in the Sky. You must must ride single file. There are no road shoulders or bike lanes; please be aware of passing vehicles.

Backcountry Roads

Canyonlands is famous for its mountain biking terrain, particularly for the 100-mile White Rim Road at Island in the Sky. The 100-mile White Rim Road loops around and below the Island in the Sky mesa top and provides expansive views of the surrounding area. Bicycle trips usually take three to four days. Overnight and day-use permits are required.

Do I Need a Permit?

  • Day Use: If you’re taking a day trip on the White Rim, Elephant Hill, Lavender Canyon, or Peekaboo/Horse Canyon roads, you need a day-use permit.
  • Overnight: If you’re going on an overnight trip, you need an overnight permit.

During the spring and fall, demand for permits frequently exceeds the number available. If you plan to visit Canyonlands during peak season, especially to bike and camp along the White Rim Road, we recommend making reservations well in advance. You can reserve overnight permits up to four months in advance of the start of your trip. Day-use permits are available up to 24 hours in advance of your trip.

Mountain bike groups must travel single-file, remain on established roads, and camp in designated sites. There is no single-track riding in the park. We recommend a support vehicle for all multi-day bike trips: there are no water sources along most of the roads. Guided trips are available for many destinations within Canyonlands.

Electronic Bicycles (e-bikes)

On August 30, 2019 the National Park Service announced a new electric bicycle (e-bike) policy for national parks, expanding recreational opportunities and accessibility. The policy supports Secretary’s Order 3376, signed by U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt on August 29, 2019, that directs Department of the Interior (DOI) bureaus to create a clear and consistent e-bike policy on all federal lands managed by the Department.

Beginning October 1, 2019, visitors to Southeast Utah Group parks (Arches and Canyonlands national parks and Hovenweep and Natural Bridges national monuments) will be allowed to use e-bikes where traditional bicycles are allowed. Bicycles and e-bikes are allowed on paved and unpaved roads that are open to the public. Bicycles and e-bikes are not allowed on any trails in the parks.

There are no charging stations in the parks. Generators are not allowed in the backcountry. This change in e-bike policy applies to private and commercial use in the parks.

The National Park Service announcement and the agency’s new e-bike policy are available online at www.nps.gov/orgs/1207/ebikepolicy.htm.

Photography

Canyonlands is a paradise for photographers. Under conditions of constantly changing light, the varicolored landscape provides limitless photographic opportunities. Often, the difference between an average photograph and an exceptional photograph is good lighting. Low sun angles at sunrise and sunset can add brilliant color to the rock. Scattered clouds can also add depth to an image and a passing storm can provide extremely dramatic lighting.


Join guest speaker, Dr. Alex Lockwood of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and rangers for night of discovery and stargazing.

NASA’s next great observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope, will complement the Hubble Space Telescope but see things in a whole new light: infrared light that is! This HUGE (21 foot) telescope will unfold in space and take pictures of distant planets, stars, nebulae, and galaxies, to give us a more complete picture of how our universe works. We will witness stars being born and see some of the earliest things created in the universe. Dr. Lockwood will talk about this telescope, its amazing engineering, and the incredible scientific discoveries it will bring to humanity.

James Webb Space Telescope

Southeastern Utah has particularly dark night skies, thanks to the distance from major metropolitan areas. Rangers from Arches and Canyonlands national parks will join forces—and telescopes—to offer visitors a chance to experience “the park after dark.” A short constellation tour will be followed by telescope viewing.

Meet at Arches National Park. Check at the visitor center for time and location. Bring a chair, water, a red flashlight (if you have one), and warm clothes.

Programs will be changed or canceled in the event of bad weather.

About the speaker: Dr. Alex Lockwood

Dr. Lockwood is the science communications lead for NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. Her background in astrophysics and her passion for people enable her to engage the public with amazing stories of the incredible science and technology of NASA’s missions. Her previous science communications roles included supporting the NOAA/NASA Joint Polar Satellite System program as well as leading efforts for the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia. She received her PhD in Planetary Sciences from Caltech and her BS in Astronomy and Physics from the University of Maryland. Alex has starred in two movies based on the webcomic, PhD Comics, and enjoys hiking, yoga, and spending time with loved ones.


Arches National Park

Memorial Day Weekend

Tips for an enjoyable visit.

Arches and Canyonlands National Parks Prepare for Busy Memorial Day Weekend

Visitors can expect long lines at park entrance gates during Memorial Day weekend.

Arches and Canyonlands national parks are preparing for a busy Memorial Day weekend, and are advising visitors to expect heavy traffic, crowded trails, and limited parking.

“Memorial Day weekend is typically our busiest weekend of the year,” said Superintendent Kate Cannon. “We recommend patience and flexibility for visitors planning a trip to the parks.”

Visitors arriving at the parks between 9:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. should expect long lines at park entrance gates that could last up to an hour. Parking lots and trails inside the parks will be very crowded. If the parks become full, staff may delay vehicles from entering the park until space opens to accommodate more people and vehicles.

“We want these entry delays to be as short as possible. To avoid being caught in a delay, we recommend people come to the parks early in the morning or late in the afternoon,” Cannon said.

Park rangers ask that vehicles waiting in line at the entrance gate keep pace with traffic in the line and have payment ready. Credit cards are preferred. Current pass holders and returning visitors should have passes and identification ready. There are no toilet facilities or drinking water along park entrance roads.

When the park is full, we may temporarily delay entry into the park. These delayed entries would likely occur late morning or early afternoon. We may need two or three hours until conditions ease before we resume normal operations. During the peak time of the day, consider visiting one of the many nearby attractions in the Moab area (see below).

Visitors should plan for their safety by packing water and snacks and wearing sturdy shoes and sun protection.

Visitors are encouraged to check the parks’ websites or Twitter accounts for current entrance gate information and road conditions prior to leaving for their visit.

Arches:

Canyonlands:

Arches National Park Webcams

The webcams below provide views from either end of the Arches National Park entrance road. Traffic may back up between the entrance station and US 191 causing delays of up to an hour.

Arches National Park Entrance Road

Highway 191 near Arches National Park Entrance Road.

Activities Outside of the National Parks

Hiking Trails

The Corona Arch trail leads to one of the most impressive arches in the entire Moab area.

The Moab area contains a large number of pet friendly trails on public lands to suit any experience level. From cool stream-side hikes to spectacular sandstone arches, the Moab area is full of exciting day-hikes suitable for the entire family. What follows is just a taste of what Moab has to offer.

Read More…

Dinosaur Field Trip

Dinosaurs contemplate mountain biking in Moab.

With so many dinosaur resources in one place, Moab is the perfect place to design your own Family Dinosaur Field Trip!

Start your Dinosaur Field Trip in downtown Moab, at the Museum of Moab. Check out a full cast skeleton of Gastonia one of the armored dinosaurs that lived in this area during the Early Cretaceous. The museum also features numerous dinosaur displays, including a cast of the leg of the terrifying Utahraptor.

Continue your journey at Paleosafari Moab Giants, where you can journey back through time with a 3D cinema introducing you to the prehistoric world of dinosaurs. You can also make your own tracks on a half mile hiking trail populated with state-of the art life-size dinosaurs! The Tracks Museum features interactive learning touch screens, games to play, and visually stunning exhibits that not only fascinate, but educate.

After learning about the dinosaur species that once walked these lands, continue north of Moab to one or more of the Moab Dinosaur Sites. A variety of hiking trails will take you to some of the best preserved dinosaur tracks and bones in the country.

Rock Art

Birthing Scene

The Moab area has numerous examples of Indian rock art to enjoy. This page briefly discusses some types, dates, the artists and their cultures and how to take care of these irreplaceable sites. Directions are included to a number of sites which allow you to sample some of the easily accessible ancient rock art in the Moab area. All sites are accessible with a passenger car and a short walk!

Read More…

Dead Horse Point State Park

Dead Horse Point provides the same type of views you would experience in Canyonlands National Park.

32 miles (51.5 km) from Moab, Dead Horse Point State Park is one of Utah’s most spectacular state parks. The view from Dead Horse Point is one of the most photographed scenic vistas in the world. Towering 2,000 feet above the Colorado River, the overlook provides a breathtaking panorama of Canyonlands’ sculpted pinnacles and buttes. Millions of years of geologic activity created the spectacular views from Dead Horse Point State Park. Deposition of sediments by ancient oceans, freshwater lakes, streams and wind blown sand dunes created the rock layers of canyon country. Igneous activity formed the high mountains that rise like cool blue islands from the desert below.

Read more…

Scenic Byways

View of Fisher Towers from along Upper Colorado River Scenic Byway (U-128)

The Moab area is blessed with three State Scenic Byways. State Scenic Byways help recognize, preserve and enhance selected roads throughout the United States based on their archeological, cultural, historic, natural, recreational and scenic qualities. Every trip to Moab should include a drive along at least one byway, although driving all three is great way to spend a relaxing day.

Read more…

Mountain Biking

Moab Brands Focus Area

Welcome to the home of the greatest mountain biking on the planet! Moab offers a huge variety of trails for mountain bikers of any experience level, from beginners looking for a scenic ride through beautiful canyons and mesa tops, to seasoned bikers looking for the ultimate challenge. Moab is well known for the world famous, and highly technical, Slickrock Bike Trail. This challenging 9.6 mile trail is considered by many to be the ultimate mountain biking experience. Moab, however, also contains a huge assortment of scenic biking trails of all difficulty levels.

Read More…

Sand Flats Recreation Area

Sand Flats Recreation Area

The Sand Flats Recreation Area near Moab, Utah is a nationally significant public lands treasure at the heart of the Colorado Plateau. A high plain of slick rock domes, bowls and fins, it rises in the east to meet the colorful mesas and nearly 13,000 foot peaks of the La Sal Mountains. Sand Flats’ famous Slickrock and Porcupine Rim bike trails and almost 40 miles of jeep trails are world-renowned for their combination of challenge and awesome scenery. Sand Flats is also popular for camping. Over 100,000 visitors enjoy this 9,000-acre recreation area annually.

Read more…

River Activities

Paddle Boarding on the Colorado River

While our area is known for its family oriented whitewater trips on the Fisher Towers section of the Colorado River, there are wilder single and multi-day trips available in Westwater Canyon. Additionally, canoes, kayaks, and paddle boards are the perfect way to explore the calm water segments of the Colorado. Individuals or groups may raft the river on their own or with a professional river outfitter.

Read more…

Moab Outdoor Adventure Guide

The Moab Outdoor Adventure Guide is a new comprehensive guide to adventures and activities that are available on the public lands surrounding Moab. If you are interested in hiking, off-road driving, river activities, scenic byways, dark sky observing, mountain biking, e-biking, rock art tours, camping, dinosaur trails, or traveling with pets, this guide will set you on the right path. It will be going to press in a few months however the FREE eBook version is available right now! Click here to view the Moab Outdoor Adventure Guide online.


Woman and child in Canyonlands National Park

There’s no place on Earth quite like Moab, Utah—it’s why millions of people flock here every year from every corner of the planet to hike, bike, raft, off-road, and generally enjoy the otherworldly scenery and unique terrain. In fact, some of us love it so much that we live here year-round. And while the Utah desert seems like a rugged place, you might be surprised to learn the environment is surprisingly sensitive. To make sure everybody—both locals and visitors alike—has the chance to enjoy our little slice of paradise for generations to come, residents of Moab are taking steps toward sustainability with the Moab First Sustainable Tourism Program. When you visit Moab, keep the following tips in mind to visit like a local and do your part to protect this amazing landscape.

Stay on the Trail

Hikers in Grandstaff Canyon

While the desert soil may look unassuming, it’s actually teeming with life. Biological soil crust (also known as cryptobiotic soil) is a major part of the desert ecosystem, and helps prevent erosion as well as trap nitrogen and other plant-friendly nutrients in the soil. Cryptobiotic soil is also incredibly sensitive, and can take decades to recover from even a few footsteps breaking through the crust. When you visit Moab, make sure to stay on established trails and roads—and if established routes aren’t available, do your best to walk through dry creek beds or on bare rock.

Leave No Trace

Most people with a conscience already know not to litter up the great outdoors, but there’s more to Leave No Trace than just packing out all your trash and recyclables. When picking a campsite, use a pre-existing spot rather than placing your tent on top of vegetation, and make sure to stay at least 300 feet from water to avoid scaring animals away from critical sources of hydration. And speaking of wildlife, make sure to give them plenty of room in general—keep pets leashed, and teach children never to chase, approach, or pick up wild animals.

Respect the Rocks

Moab and the surrounding areas are home to an incredible number of ruins, artifacts, and ancient rock art. While it can be tempting to get up close and personal, make sure to admire from a distance—and look, but don’t touch. We want to keep these pieces of ancient history around for many years to come—so stay out of ruins, leave any artifacts you find in place, and encourage others to do the same, so everyone can appreciate the wonder of ancient civilizations well into the future.

Bring Your Own Bags

MoabFirst Reuseable Bags

Starting in January 2019, the city of Moab enacted a ban on single-use plastic bags. It’s part of Moab’s efforts to help curb the use of disposable plastic products. Besides being a major litter problem, plastic bags also tend to make their way into waterways and oceans where they can harm animals, as the plastic bits don’t biodegrade even as they become divided into tiny pieces. Remember to bring your own reusable bags for any grocery or souvenir shopping, several businesses will have reusable available during January supporting the plastic-bag ban.

Drive Electric

Moab Recharging Station

As part of its new sustainability strategy, Moab now features 10 electric-vehicle charging stations located throughout the city, as well as four additional Tesla supercharging stations that can charge Tesla vehicles halfway in about 20 minutes. A recent study by the Utah Department of Transportation estimates an average of 13,000 vehicles at the intersection of Moab’s Main and Center streets—if even a small fraction of those cars were electric, we could save hundreds of thousands of pounds of air pollution every year.

Eat & Shop Local

Downtown Moab, Utah

Another great way to visit Moab like a local is supporting local businesses that have made a commitment to sustainability. Keep an eye out for businesses with a Green to Gold sign—the Green to Gold program is a city-sponsored initiative encouraging establishments to take simple steps to reduce their environmental impact. In the summer of 2018 alone, Green to Gold businesses in Moab saved over 850,000 kWh—the same amount of energy used by 136 cars over the course of an entire year, or the annual CO2 emissions from 68 homes.

With these six tips in mind, you’ll be helping the cause of keeping Moab an amazing destination (and an amazing place to live) for years to come. For more information on Moab’s sustainability efforts or to start planning your trip, visit discovermoab.com.


Woman and child in Arches National Park

MoabFirst

Sustainable Tourism in Moab, Utah

“MoabFirst” brings together the local community, business owners, land agencies, local Government Departments, and Grand County, Utah Stakeholders to develop the short-term and long-term Sustainable Tourism Criteria for Moab, Utah. Setting short and long term goals will allow the “MoabFirst” Sustainable Tourism Committee to plan, execute, and monitor the Criteria for the future of Moab, Grand County local community and its visitors.

Moab Sustainability


Sustainable Tourism is defined by the United National World Tourism Organization as “ Tourism that takes full account of its current and future economic, social and environmental impacts, addressing the needs of visitors, the industry, the environment and host communities”.

MoabFirst Logo

Moab’s Plastic Bag Ban

The Moab City Council, in September 2018, voted unanimously to enact a ban on single-use, carry-out type plastic bags. The goal is to reduce the use of throwaway plastic products, particularly lightweight plastic bags, which are a litter problem and escape into waterways and oceans where they are harmful to animals and may enter the food chain as they degrade into smaller and smaller – but still plastic – pieces. The ban is another step toward the City meeting its goals as established in its “2020 Vision: A Sustainable Moab Plan,” which was passed by the Moab City Council in 2008.

The MoabFirst Event

The “MoabFirst” event will take place on January 18, 2018, in front of the Moab Information Center on the corner of Main and Center Streets (weather permitting). The Moab Area Travel Council will be giving away the reusable bag to anyone in Moab supporting the Moab City Plastic Bag Ban. We will ask each person, before they receive the bag, what two things they will do to support sustainability in 2019.

MoabFirst Reuseable Bags

This is the beginning of the “MoabFirst” Sustainable Tourism Program from The Moab Area Travel Council to appreciate, protect, and preserve all that we have here in Grand County.

Moab’s Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

Through a $50,000 grant from Rocky Mountain Power’s Plug-In Electric Vehicle Program, the City of Moab has installed 10 level 2 electric vehicle charging stations at five locations throughout the community. Plug-in electric vehicles can help substantially improve air quality because they have zero, or very little, tailpipe emissions. Conventional vehicles produce carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. At level 2 stations, a vehicle can be fully charged in four-to-six hours.

The charging station initiative is part of an effort to transform the region’s transportation system by incentivizing the development of geographically dispersed charging infrastructure, increased energy security through reduced petroleum usage, and the implementation of reliable alternative transportation.

Moab Recharging Station

The new charging stations are located at:

  • ACT Campground, 1536 S. Mill Creek Drive
  • Adventure Inn, 512 N. Main St.
  • Center Street Gym, 203 E. Center St.
  • Moab Golf Course, 2705 East Bench Rd
  • Moab Springs Ranch, 1266 N. U.S. Highway 191

Tesla Supercharger Stations

In addition to the 10 level 2 electric vehicle charging stations, Moab also has 4 Tesla Supercharger stations. Superchargers provide Tesla vehicles with half a charge in about 20 minutes. The 4 stations are located at:

  • Best Western Plus Moab, 16 South Main St

Widespread vehicle electrification across the country could reduce greenhouse gas emissions by between 430 million metric tons and 550 million metric tons annually by 2050. In a recent study, the Utah Department of Transportation recorded an average of 13,000 vehicles at the intersection of Main and Center streets. If one percent of those vehicles were electric, an average of 124,800 pounds (62 tons) of air pollution could be avoided locally each year.

Moab’s ACT Campground – A Model of Sustainability

ACT Campground and Learning Center in Moab, Utah is a green-integrated camp park that models the ways commercial or residential properties can be environmentally friendly.

Visit Like a Local

Woman and child in Canyonlands National Park

Welcome to our home. Moab locals take pride in the region’s special places, and they live by the “Leave No Trace” code of ethics. To preserve our home for future generations, visit like a local and observe the following practices:

Stay on the Trail – Protect Biological Soil Crust
Drive and ride only on roads and trails where such travel is allowed; hike only on established trails, on rock, or in washes (dry stream beds). Biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, is the foundation of desert plant life. This black, knobby crust is made up of many different living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the desert ecosystem.

Biological Soil
Stay on the Trail Logo

Biocrust holds together sand grains, which helps prevent erosion and dust. It also holds moisture and fixes nitrogen in the soil, which helps plants to survive. However, this sensitive soil is extremely fragile and can take decades to grow. Even a footstep can damage the crust for decades, having lasting impacts on the desert environment. Please stay on the trails. Help protect this fragile, but crucial, life by remaining on designated roads, routes, and trails at all times. Where hiking trails are not established, hike in sandy washes (dry stream beds) or on bare rock.

Note that immature Biological Crust looks similar to light-colored bare soil but develops into the mature black pinnacles.

Leave No Trace of Your Camping
Camp at designated sites or, where allowed, at previously used sites. Avoid placing tents on top of vegetation and use a camp stove instead of making a campfire. Use a portable toilet. Unless signs indicate otherwise, leave gates open or closed as you find them.

Help Keep Canyon Country Clean
Pack out your trash and recycle it, clean up after less thoughtful visitors, and dispose of human waste properly.

Protect And Conserve Scarce Desert Water Sources
Camp at least 300 feet from isolated water sources to allow for wildlife access. Carry your own drinking water. Leave potholes undisturbed and wash well away from pools and springs.

Allow Space For Wildlife
When encountering wildlife, maintain your distance and remain quiet. Teach children not to chase or pick up animals. Keep pets under control.

Leave Historic Sites, Native American Rock Art, Ruins and Artifacts Untouched
Admire rock art from a distance and never touch it. Stay out of ruins, leave artifacts in place, and report violations.

Observe Posted Speed Limits
Prevent excessive noise by driving slowly through residential neighborhoods.

Moab’s Green to Gold Program

Green to Gold is sponsored by the City of Moab that offers simple solutions to help Moab businesses reduce their impact, save money and gain recognition for their achievements in energy and water conservation, waste reduction, alternative transportation and social responsibility. The businesses recognized for Green to Gold will receive a Green to Gold sign and businesses can also earn badges for their achievements in each of the categories. The Green to Gold businesses want to make a difference in our community and we ask that you support their efforts by visiting their business.

Businesses, churches and schools have been joining the new Green to Gold Program. Participants agree to address their impact through assessments, facility audits, and free training and rebate programs. The focus in 2018 has been water and energy. During the summer of 2018 partners saved 851,768 kWh, which is the equivalent of taking 136 cars off the road for a year or the annual CO2 emissions from 68 homes. Please support the partners that are helping to make Moab a more vibrant, healthy community:

  • AArchway Inn
  • ACT Campground
  • Adventure Inn
  • Arches Electronics
  • Barlow Adventures
  • Canyonlands Auto
  • Canyonlands Field Institute
  • Canyonlands Copy Center
  • Certified Ford
  • Chile Pepper Bike Shop
  • City of Moab – Art Center, Pool & Sun Court
  • Desert Bistro
  • F & F – WC City Villas Associates
  • F and L LLC
  • Farm And City General Store
  • Flyoff Properties LLC
  • Grand County
  • Grand Tire Co
  • High Desert Auto
  • Indigo Alley
  • Knowles Home Furnishings Inc
  • La Quinta
  • Lee Nail
  • Lost River Trading Co Inc
  • Mcelhaney Construction
  • Mega Blue
  • Moab Auto Parts
  • Moab Free Health Clinic
  • Moab Home Center Inc
  • Moab Ice LLC
  • Moab Made
  • Moab Side X Side Adventures
  • Moab Tour Company
  • Monument Waste Services
  • Nation’s
  • Navtec Expeditions Inc
  • Original Red Dirt Shirts
  • Recycling Center
  • Royce Electronics
  • Sheri Griffith Exped
  • Sherry’s Country Store
  • Times Independent
  • T & H Corner Stop
  • The Arches Book Co
  • Turner Lumber
  • U S Post Office
  • UDOT Region 4
  • Wabisabi Inc
  • Ye Ol Geezer Meat Shop
  • Zions National Bank


Welcome to Moab

Welcome to Moab

A Stunning New 4K Film at the Moab Information Center

Experience the stunning new film, “Welcome to Moab”, in the Moab Information Center’s 4K Ultra HD Theater


“Welcome to Moab” is an immersive 4K theater film that provides visitors with an outstanding overview of the public lands and diverse activities possible around Moab, Utah. Produced in 2017, the film combines impressive ultra-high-definition 4K footage, time lapse photography, and aerial perspectives of the ruggedly spectacular public lands that surround Moab. Watching this 20 minute film at the beginning of your visit will provide the best possible orientation for visiting this spectacular part of the world. The film is repeated throughout the day at the Moab Information Center, located at the corner of Main and Center Streets in Moab.

You don’t have to wait until you get to Moab to watch the new “Welcome to Moab” film. The film is now available on Blu-ray & DVD! In addition to a great overview of all there is to see and do in the Moab area, the disc also includes:

  • Canyonlands by Air
  • Arches Winter’s Day
  • Moab Jeep Tour
  • Moab Mountain Biking

Click here to order your copy today.