Dead Horse Point State Park

The view from Dead Horse Point is one of the most photographed scenic vistas in the world.

Introduction

32 miles (51.5 km) from Moab, Dead Horse Point State Park is one of Utah’s most spectacular state parks. The view from Dead Horse Point is one of the most photographed scenic vistas in the world. Towering 2,000 feet above the Colorado River, the overlook provides a breathtaking panorama of Canyonlands’ sculpted pinnacles and buttes. Millions of years of geologic activity created the spectacular views from Dead Horse Point State Park. Deposition of sediments by ancient oceans, freshwater lakes, streams and wind blown sand dunes created the rock layers of canyon country. Igneous activity formed the high mountains that rise like cool blue islands from the desert below.

The legend of Dead Horse Point states that around the turn of the century the point was used as a corral for wild mustangs roaming the mesa top. Cowboys herded them across the narrow neck of land and onto the point. The neck was then fenced off with branches and brush. One time, for some unknown reason, horses were left corralled on the waterless point where they died of thirst within view of the Colorado River 2,000 feet below.

There are miles of pet-friendly developed hiking trails in the park, including a paved trail which provides easy access to some of the most scenic views. Mountain Bikers will love the new Intrepid Trail System at Dead Horse Point. With slickrock sections, looping singletrack, sandy washes, and incredible scenery, the Intrepid Trail System provides a great taste of what Moab mountain biking is all about. This is the perfect ride for families and offers spectacular views of the Colorado River and Canyonlands National Park.

Distance from Moab
32 Miles (51.5 km)
Directions from Moab
Drive 9 miles (14.5 km) northwest of Moab on US 191 and then 23 miles (37 km) southwest on Utah 313. Driving time to the visitor center from Moab is roughly 45 minutes.
Park Hours
Park open year-round, 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. – Visitor Center open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. year round, closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Years Day.
Fees
Day Use fees (valid for 3 consecutive days starting from the date of purchase):
  • $20 per vehicle (up to 8 passengers)
  • $15 for Utah Seniors (Utah residents 62 or over)
  • $10 per motorcycle
  • $4 pedestrian or cyclist (biking into park)
  • Commercial day-use fee: $4 per person
Visitors Center and Hours
The visitor center is open year-round, has facilities for the disabled, an information area, exhibits, rest rooms, water, publications and souvenirs. The visitor center hours open from 9am-5pm year round, closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Years Day.(435) 259-2614

Kayenta and Windgate Campgrounds

Nestled within a grove of juniper, the Kayenta Campground at Dead Horse Point State Park offers a peaceful, shaded respite from the surrounding desert. All twenty-one sites offer lighted shade structures, picnic tables, fire rings, and tent pads. All sites are also equipped with RV electrical hookups. Modern restroom facilities are available, and trails lead directly from the campground to various points of interest within the park. 21 sites/4 non-reservable/1 ADA accessible.

New in 2018, the Wingate Campground sits atop the mesa with far reaching views to the area’s mountain ranges and deep canyons. This campground contains thirty-one (31) campsites, twenty (20) of which have electrical hookups that support RV or tent campers while eleven (11) are walk-in, tent only sites. All sites have fire-pits, picnic tables under shade shelters, and access to bathrooms with running water and dish washing sinks. RV sites will accommodate vehicles up to 56′ and there is a dump station at the entrance to the campground. To make a camping reservation contact Reserve America at 1-800-322-3770, or visit reserveamerica.com.

Yurts

The nine yurts at Dead Horse Point State Park provide the most luxurious accommodations that can be found atop the mesa. A perfect location for experiencing sunrise and sunset, the yurts enjoy sweeping views of both the canyons to the south and the La Sal mountains to the east. A private spur of the Intrepid Trail System gives easy access to the otherwise remote Big Chief and Pyramid Canyon overlooks. Each yurt contains sleeping space for up to six people, in the form of bunked double beds and a pullout futon couch. An outdoor propane grill allows for cooking on site, with the park providing propane free of charge. Heat, air conditioning, and electrical outlets are available, and comfortable seating areas both indoors and outdoors provide for a relaxing environment in any weather condition. Modern restroom facilities are located within easy walking distance.

Please note that pets are not allowed in the yurts, or in vehicles outside of the yurts. If you would like to spend the night in the park with your furry friend, consider the Kayenta Campground.

To make a camping reservation contact Reserve America at 1-800-322-3770, or visit reserveamerica.com.

Camping Fees

  • Kayenta and Windgate campgrounds are $40 per night (RV Campsites) and $35 (Hike-in Only Campsites at Windgate). Maximum of 8 people per site.
  • Yurts: $140 per night year round, maximum of 6 people per site
  • Camping and yurt fees accommodate one vehicle. Extra vehicles are charged a $15 fee.
  • Reservations can be made four months in advance by calling 1-800-322-3770 or online at reserveamerica.com. First-come, first-served openings may be available at the park.
  • There are no water hookups for RV’s. Fill up your RVs in Moab.

Park Highlights

Pet Friendly Hiking Trails

Pet Friendly Hiking Trails

Eight miles of pet friendly hiking trails in the park include two joining loops around the rim and several spurs to beautiful viewpoints.

Mountain Biking

Mountain Biking

The Intrepid Trail System has three hiking and biking loops ranging from one to nine miles with varying degrees of difficulty.

Yurts

Yurts

Nine yurts are available for overnight use and are available by reservation. Open year-round.

Experience Dead Horse Point

Experience Dead Horse Point

Dead Horse Point’s combination of breathtaking scenery and easy accessibility has made it a must-see for visitors to the Moab area.

Night Skies

Dead Horse Point State Park, recognized as an International Dark Sky Park in 2016, is one of the most active and accessible areas to stargaze in the Moab area. Its high plateau location, mountains far in the distance and cities out of sight yields a nearly full view of celestial sphere. Park staff routinely provide programs celebrating the night sky, from walks under the full moon to gazing through telescopes at objects millions of light years away. Whether you want to enjoy by yourself or join a ranger, Dead Horse Point State Park is a premier spot to see the skies our ancestors wondered over and survived with.

Download Dead Horse Point State Park’s Dark Sky Brochure to learn more.

Biological Soil Crust

Help to keep all of our trails open. Protect this fragile, but crucial, soil by remaining on designated roads, routes and trails at all times.

Biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, is the foundation of desert plant life. This black, knobby crust is made up of many different living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the desert ecosystem. However, this sensitive soil is extremely fragile and can take decades to grow. Even a footstep can damage the crust for decades, having lasting impacts on the desert environment. Please stay on the trials. Help to protect this fragile life by remaining on designated roads, routes, and trails at all times. Where hiking trails are not established, hike in sandy washes or on bare rock.

Mountain Biking the Intrepid Trail

Overview
Deadhorse Point State Park, 32 miles west of Moab

Difficulty
Easy to Moderate

Length
Big Chief: 3.6 miles
Crossroads: 1.7 miles
Great Pyramid: 2.2 miles
Intrepid: 0.5 miles
Prickly Pair: 3.0 miles
Raven Roll: 1.7 miles
Twisted Tree: 1.5 miles
Whiptail: 2.6 miles

Elevation @ Trailhead
5900’

Season
Ideal in spring, fall and winter; midday heat in July and August

Directions
Nine miles northwest of Moab on US 191 and then 23 miles southwest on Utah 313 to the end of the highway.

Trail Description

With slickrock sections, looping singletrack, sandy washes, and incredible scenery, the Intrepid Trail System provides a great taste of what Moab mountain biking is all about. This is the perfect ride for families and offers spectacular views of the Colorado River and Canyonlands National Park.

The Intrepid Trail System has 8 segments totaling just over 16 miles of trail for mountain bikers and hikers to enjoy varying through degrees of intermediate difficulty. The eastern section of the trail is easier and often recommended for beginning riders in the Moab area, while the western loop is more challenging. The entirety of the system will offer opportunities for visitors of all ages and abilities, and provide breathtaking views. Unlike the hiking trails, pets are not welcome on the Intrepid Trail System for human, animal and environmental safety.

The Intrepid Trail was made possible through great public/private partnerships. Intrepid Potash, Inc., for which the trail is named, gave $20,000 for construction of a new single-track, non-motorized trail system. The trail was built by Trail Mix, a local volunteer organization, and volunteers from the Utah Conservation Corps, American Conservation Experience and Moab Trails Alliance. The National Park Service and Utah State Parks also worked on the project. Dead Horse Point State Park is located approximately 30 miles from Moab. The park also offers camping and day-use facilities, visitor center, and naturalist programs. For more information call (435) 259-2614.





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