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Delicate Arch

Delicate Arch

Among the countless things to do in Arches National Park, Delicate Arch is probably what called you here. It stands alone, unsupported by nearby walls or structures at the top of a large sandstone basin, as if it’s watching over the park. It’s no wonder how Delicate Arch got its name (although it’s been called many other things before). This is the most popular destination in Arches National Park, and has become a definitive icon for Southern Utah recognized around the world. Be sure to pay this 52 foot tall arch a visit on your next trip; however good pictures may be, they’ll never do it justice.

Delicate Arch Hiking Trail

After 1.5 miles of moderately difficult hiking, you’ll be rewarded with an unbeatable view, and a chance to see the arch up close. On the way, expect to see petroglyphs, another arch (Frame Arch), and do some red rock scrambling.

Hikers beware, the Delicate Arch trail often surprises visitors by being more difficult than they’d expected. The entire trail is sun-exposed, offering little shade, and has multiple steep sections. Be sure to bring ample water, snacks, and sun protection, and do your part to protect the park. Please do not climb on the park’s natural structures or touch historic artifacts like petroglyphs.


Trail Details:

  • Length: 3.2 miles round trip, 1.5 miles to Delicate Arch
  • Time: 2-3 hours
  • Elevation Gain: 550 foot gain
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Trail Type: Out-and-back, mostly slickrock, hikers only
  • Trailhead: Wolfe Ranch Parking Lot Get Directions.
  • GPS Coordinates: 38.735502, -109.520666
  • Tips: Bring plenty of water and a camera, pets are not allowed

Directions To The Trailhead


Trail Map

Delicate Arch Viewpoints

As an alternative to the three mile hike, visitors can see the arch from two separate viewpoints, both of which are more accessible than the hiking trail. You’ll start at the same trailhead (Wolfe Ranch parking lot), where both viewpoints and the hiking trail start off. The lower viewpoint is the closest by, but a short trek to the upper viewpoint will provide a much better vantage point.

LOWER VIEWPOINT

The lower Delicate Arch viewpoint is just less than 14 miles from the visitor center, at the Wolfe Ranch parking lot. Take the trail on the right to reach the lower viewpoint.
Getting to the Viewpoint: The lower Delicate Arch viewpoint lies just less than 14 miles from the visitor center, on Delicate Arch Rd. Get Directions

UPPER VIEWPOINT

From the same parking area, you can take a short walk to the upper Delicate Arch viewpoint. The upper viewpoint is .5 mi away, and the trail leads up a fairly steep incline. However, you’ll have a much better vantage of Delicate Arch. This viewpoint is the best alternative if you won’t be able to hike to the arch during your visit.
Getting to the Viewpoint: The trail starts at the same parking area. Take the trail on the left a half mile up the hill to the viewpoint. Get Directions

Tips for Seeing Delicate Arch


Visit at Sunrise or After Sunset

Delicate Arch is the busiest destination in the park. If you plan to hike the trail between noon and sunset, expect to share the trail with many other hikers. For a less crowded experience, we’d recommend visiting the arch during sunrise, or after the sun has set. Remember, Arches National Park is open 24 hours a day, so you can get an early start and watch the sun rise over the park, or see the Delicate Arch’s silhouette beneath a starry sky.

How Long Is The Hike?

The Delicate Arch trail is 3.2 miles long, round-trip. While you may be able to finish the hike in under an hour, most visitors will spend some time at the arch. Allow between two and three hours to complete the hike without being rushed.

Don’t Bust The Crust!

Arches National Park is home to a beautiful ecosystem. Resilient critters and plants call this arid, unforgiving desert home. While it may seem unassuming, many areas of dirt play a critical role in providing water to the ecosystem. This biological soil crust (or cryptobiotic soil) is incredibly sensitive, and will be damaged if stepped on. Please watch your step, stay on the trail, and do your part to help protect the park.

Moab is home to some of the greatest hiking trails on Earth. Explore other things to do near the Delicate Arch trail, and start planning your trip by finding a place to stay.


Arches National Park

Arches National Park

The world’s largest concentration of natural sandstone arches.

Arches Timed Entry Reservation System Ends

Reservations are no longer required to enter Arches National Park. During busy weekends expect the return of long lines at the park entrance and periodic gate closings for several hours. For the best experience try to avoid entering the park between 8am and 2pm on busy days.

The National Park Service will be evaluating the results from the Pilot Timed Entry Reservation System over the next few months to determine the future direction of park operations.

Introduction

Located just 5 miles (8 km) north of Moab is Arches National Park, which contains the world’s largest concentration of natural sandstone arches. Although over 2,000 arches are located within the park’s 76,518 acres, the park also contains an astounding variety of other geological formations. Colossal sandstone fins, massive balanced rocks, soaring pinnacles and spires dwarf visitors as they explore the park’s viewpoints and hiking trails. A paved scenic drive takes visitors to many of the major viewpoints within the park. The park’s rock formations delight children as well as adults, with many easy trails providing opportunities for kids to get out of the car and explore the arches up close. Hikers can choose from a wide variety of trails, from short twenty minute walks leading right up to many of the largest arches in the park, to more adventurous hikes into lesser seen areas.
Distance from Moab
5 miles (8km)
Directions from Moab
The entrance of Arches is located 5 miles (8km) north of Moab, along highway 191.
Park Hours
Arches National Park is normally open year-round, 24 hours a day. The park is very busy between March and October. To avoid traffic, we recommend entering the park before 8 am or after 3 pm.
Entrance Fee
$30/vehicle – Good for 7 days. (Subject to change.)
Visitor Center & Hours
The visitor center includes interactive exhibits, educational kiosks, a 150-seat auditorium, and a bookstore featuring guide books, maps, DVD’s, postcards, and much more. The park is open 24 hours/day, 365 days/year; however the visitor center hours vary by season. (435) 719-2299

TWITTER

WEBCAM 1

WEBCAM 2


This is the latest Twitter feed from Arches National Park. During busy times this is a great source of information relating to park closure information.

Winter Sunset at Delicate Arch
The Three Gossips at Arches National Park
Arches National Park

Suggested Activities

A Few Hours
Drive the 36 mile (58km) round trip Scenic Drive.
1/2 Day
Drive the Scenic Drive and hike some of the easy short trails in the park, such as the Park Avenue Trail and trails in the Windows Section of the park.
Full Day

Drive the Scenic Drive and hike some of the longer trails in the park, such as the trails to Double O Arch, Tower Arch, Delicate Arch, and Landscape Arch.
Several Days
Hikers can experience a wide variety of hiking trails, including some of the lesser-seen, yet equally spectacular areas of the park such as the “Primitive Loop” in the Devil’s Garden section of the park.

Camping

The Devils Garden Campground is located eighteen miles from the park entrance and is open year-round. Facilities include potable water, picnic tables, grills, as well as both pit-style and flush toilets. There are no showers. Bring your own wood or charcoal for the grills. Some sites will accommodate RVs up to 30 feet in length.Telephone and on-line reservations for both group and individual sites may be made through recreation.gov. Reservations are not accepted by the park, and the park does not maintain information about site availability.

  • Individual Sites: You can reserve standard campsites up to 6 months in advance for stays March 1-October 31. All sites are usually reserved months in advance. Between November 1 and February 28, sites are first-come, first-served. Facilities include drinking water, picnic tables, grills, and both pit-style and flush toilets. You can reserve campsites for nights between March 1 and October 31. Between November 1 and February 28, all sites are first-come, first served. Phone and online reservations for both group and individual sites must be made through recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. You can make reservations for standard sites no fewer than four days and no more than 6 months in advance. The fee per night for an individual Devils Garden campsite i $25. Group size is limited to 10 people and 2 vehicles.
  • Group Sites: Group sites can be reserved up to 12 months in advance. The campground has two sites for groups of 11 or more people. Juniper Basin campsite accommodates up to 55 people and is available March 1 to October 31; Canyon Wren campsite accommodates up to 35 and may be reserved year-round. No RVs or trailers are permitted in the group sites.
Campsites are usually reserved months in advance during the busy season (March-October). If you have not reserved a site prior to arrival at the park during these months, plan on utilizing other camping options in the Moab area. There are no services inside Arches National Park. The nearest place to get food, gas, and supplies is Moab, approximately 45-60 minutes’ drive from the campground.

Recreation.gov Mobile App

Food

Please note that food is not available within the park. The closest restaurants are either in the town of Moab, at Dead Horse Point State Park, or at the dinosaur museum at the intersection of Highways 191 and 313 (entrance fee is not required to access the restaurant).

Park Highlights

Delicate Arch in Arches National Park

Delicate Arch

Delicate Arch

People come from all over the world to visit Arches National Park, and visiting Delicate Arch is on the top of many visitors’ to-do lists. In a park with over 2,000 stone arches, this particular free-standing arch has become a widely recognized symbol of the state of Utah and one of the most famous geologic features in the world. The light opening beneath the arch is 46 feet high and 32 feet wide, making it the largest free-standing arch in the park.
Learn More About Delicate Arch Hiking Trail

Balanced Rock in Arches National Park

Balanced Rock

Balanced Rock

A short paved trail leads visitors to the base of Balanced Rock. The landform’s total height is 128 feet, with the huge balanced rock rising 55 feet above its base.

Landscape Arch in Arches National Park

Landscape Arch

Landscape Arch

The longest natural rock span in the world, this arch’s opening is 306 feet wide – 6 feet longer than a football field. A nine story building would easily fit beneath this thin span. In 1991, a massive slab of rock fell from its underside, resulting in an even thinner ribbon of rock.

Wildflowers in Arches National Park

Spring Wildflowers

Spring Wildflowers

April and May bring a variety of desert wildflowers to Arches.

Double Arch in Arches National Park

Double Arch

Double Arch

Located in the Windows Section of Arches National Park, Double Arch was used as a backdrop for portions of the 1988 movie “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade”. Numerous other movies have been filmed in Arches National Park, including Thelma and Louise in 1991.

Park Avenue Trail in Arches National Park

Park Avenue

Park Avenue

From Park Avenue parking area, the trail descends steeply into a spectacular canyon and continues down the wash to Courthouse Towers. If you have a shuttle driver, you can begin at one point and be picked up at the other. For round-trip hiking, retrace your steps along the trail rather than walk along the park road.

Arches National Park in Winter

Arches in Winter

Arches in Winter

Winter brings a blanket of pristine snow to Arches, providing dramatic contrast to the surrounding red rocks.

Hiking in Arches National Park

Family Hiking

Family Hiking

There are many family friendly hikes in Arches, including the hike to Turret Arch in the Windows Section.

Biological Soil Crust

Help to keep all of our trails open. Protect this fragile, but crucial, soil by remaining on designated roads, routes and trails at all times.

Biological soil crust, also known as cryptobiotic soil, is the foundation of desert plant life. This black, knobby crust is made up of many different living organisms and plays a vital role in maintaining the desert ecosystem. However, this sensitive soil is extremely fragile and can take decades to grow. Even a footstep can damage the crust for decades, having lasting impacts on the desert environment. Please stay on the trials. Help to protect this fragile life by remaining on designated roads, routes, and trails at all times. Where hiking trails are not established, hike in sandy washes or on bare rock.

Hiking

One of the more rewarding ways to see the park is on foot. Arches features a wide variety of hikes, from short 10 minute walks (suitable for all ages) to 4 hour hikes into some of the remote sections of the park.

Easy Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Balanced Rock

0.3 mi (0.5 km) Round Trip

15-30 min

A loop trail around the base of a fragile, picturesque rock formation.

Broken Arch

1.2 mi (2 km) Round Trip or 2 mi (3.2 km) with loop

30-60 min

From the Sand Dune Arch parking area, the trail cuts across a large meadow to the arch and continues to the campground. Loop trail leads through fin canyons with sand dunes and slickrock.

Delicate Arch Viewpoint

100 yards (91 meters) round trip

10-15 min

In addition to the short accessible trail, another (moderately strenuous) hiking trail climbs one-half mile (0.8 km) toward Delicate Arch and ends at the rim of a steep canyon that separates the viewpoint from the arch. (This is not the popular trail to Delicate Arch, which starts at the Wolfe Ranch parking area. See below.)

Desert Nature Trail

0.2 mi (0.3 km) round trip

15-30 min

Discover the adaptations of plants and animals in the desert on a self-guided nature walk. Trail guide available at the trailhead near the Visitor Center.

Double Arch

0.5 mi (0.8 km) round trip

15-30 min

A relatively flat, sandy trail leads to the base of two giant arch spans which are joined at one end.

Landscape Arch

2 mi (3.2 km) round trip

30-60 min

A relatively flat, gravel-surfaced trail leads to a spectacular ribbon of rock, whose span is more than a football field in length. Short side trips to Tunnel and Pine Tree Arches.

Sand Dune Arch

0.4 mi (0.6 km) round trip

15-30 min

Trail leads through deep sand to a secluded arch among sandstone fins. Kids love the sand!

Skyline Arch

0.4 mi (0.6 km) round trip

10-20 min

A short hike on a flat, well-defined trail.

The Windows

1 mi (1.6 km) round trip

30-60 min

A gentle climb up a gravel loop trail leads to three massive arches (North and South Windows and Turret Arch). An alternate return, slightly longer, is by way of the primitive loop around the back of the two Windows. The primitive loop trail starts at the South Window viewpoint.

Moderate Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Park Avenue

1 mi (1.6 km) one way

30-60 min

From Park Avenue parking area, the trail descends steeply into a spectacular canyon and continues down the wash to the Courthouse Towers parking area. If you have a shuttle driver, you can begin at one parking area and be picked up at the other. For round-trip hiking, retrace your steps along the trail.

Tower Arch

3.4 mi (5.6 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

The trail climbs a steep, but short, rock wall, then cuts across a valley and then meanders through sandstone fins and sand dunes. An alternate, shorter trail (0.3 mile [0.4 km] one way), begins at the end of the four-wheel-drive road on the west side of Tower Arch. This unpaved road washes out quickly in rainstorms; inquire at the visitor center about road conditions before heading out.

Difficult Trails

Name

Length

Time

Description

Devils Garden Primitive Loop

7.2 mi (11.5 km) round trip

3-5 hrs

Longest of the maintained trails in the park, the Devils Garden Trail leads to eight awe-inspiring arches. Expect narrow ledges with rocky surface hiking and scrambling on slickrock. Not recommended when rock is wet or snowy.

Double O Arch

4 mi (6.4 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

Beyond Landscape Arch, the trail becomes more challenging as it climbs over sandstone slabs; footing is rocky; there are narrow ledges with exposure to heights. Spur trails lead to Partition and Navajo Arches. Dark Angel is one-half mile (0.8 km) farther. Trail guide available at trailhead.

Delicate Arch

3 mi (4.8 km) round trip

2-3 hrs

Take at least 1 quart (1 liter) of water per person! There is no shade. Open slickrock with some exposure to heights. The first half-mile is a wide, well-defined trail. Upon reaching the slickrock, follow the rock cairns. The trail climbs gradually and levels out toward the top of this rock face. Just before you get to Delicate Arch, the trail goes along a rock ledge for about 200 yards. Elevation change: 480 feet (146 meters)

Backcountry Permits

The park’s backcountry is mostly rough terrain, inaccessible by established trails with very limited water sources. While Arches National Park is known for its outstanding geologic features, it also contains irreplaceable cultural resources and sensitive high desert ecosystems. Water is rarely available in the backcountry; plan to carry all you need. Primary safety considerations include steep terrain, loose rock, lightning, flash floods, and dehydration. You must know and comply with all regulations.

You must have a permit for all overnight stays in the backcountry. Backpacking permits are no longer issued at Arches Visitor Center. We now issue permits in person at the Backcountry Permit Office two miles south of Moab up to seven days before the trip start date and up to 4:00 PM MST. Each permit is limited to seven people, three nights per campsite, for a total of seven nights. Permits cost $7 per person.

NPS Backcountry Permit Office
2282 SW Resource Blvd.
Moab, UT 84532

Electric Bicycles (e-bikes)

On August 30, 2019 the National Park Service announced a new electric bicycle (e-bike) policy for national parks, expanding recreational opportunities and accessibility. The policy supports Secretary’s Order 3376, signed by U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt on August 29, 2019, that directs Department of the Interior (DOI) bureaus to create a clear and consistent e-bike policy on all federal lands managed by the Department.

Beginning October 1, 2019, visitors to Southeast Utah Group parks (Arches and Canyonlands national parks and Hovenweep and Natural Bridges national monuments) will be allowed to use e-bikes where traditional bicycles are allowed. Bicycles and e-bikes are allowed on paved and unpaved roads that are open to the public. Bicycles and e-bikes are not allowed on any trails in the parks.

There are no charging stations in the parks. Generators are not allowed in the backcountry. This change in e-bike policy applies to private and commercial use in the parks.

The National Park Service announcement and the agency’s new e-bike policy are available online at www.nps.gov/orgs/1207/ebikepolicy.htm.

Commercial Tours

The following Moab companies offer commercial tours in Arches National Park:

Business

Phone

Type of Tour

Adrift Adventures

435-259-8594

Van/bus tours departing 3 times per day, full & half day backcountry 4×4 tours

Canyonlands Field Institute

800-860-5262

Sunset tour with short hikes

Deep Desert Expeditions

435-259-1565

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Desert Highlights

435-259-4433

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Dreamride

435-259-6419

Guided Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

JG Outfitters

612-860-9700

Guided Tours and Hiking in Arches and Canyonlands

Moab Adventure Center

888-622-4097

Arches Bus Tours

Moab Scenic Adventures

435-260-8913

Arches Half and Full Day Tours

Navtec Expeditions

800-833-1278

Front and back country tours available

Plateau Restoration

435-259-7733

Van tour with optional hikes

Red Rock Express

800-259-2869

Front country scenic tours

Tom Till Tours

435-259-5327

Photography tours in Arches and Canyonlands

Wild West Voyages

435-355-0776

Morning, Full Day, and Sunset Sightseeing and Guided Hiking Tours

Windgate Adventures

435-260-9802

Photography tours in Arches and Canyonlands

Photography

Arches National Park is a paradise for photographers. Under conditions of constantly changing light, the red rock landscape provides limitless photographic opportunities. Often, the difference between an average photograph and an exceptional photograph is good lighting. Low sun angles at sunrise and sunset can add brilliant color to the red rock. Scattered clouds can also add depth to an image and a passing storm can provide extremely dramatic lighting.
Canyonlands Photography Canyonlands Photography
Canyonlands Photography Canyonlands Photography

Photographing Delicate Arch

Over one million people visit Arches National Park every year, and just about everyone wants to see all of the major views within the park. One of the most heavily visited arches is Delicate Arch. As a result of its popularity, you should always expect to see people surrounding this world famous arch. Although it may occasionally happen, it is unrealistic to expect a solitary experience around Delicate Arch. Be courteous to other visitors during your visit to the arch, and do not expect people to move away from this world famous landmark during your photographs. Remember that not everyone who visits this arch is a photographer. Most people simply want to experience the joy of standing next to such a beautiful landmark. People can add scale to any photo of Delicate Arch, so make your visit a great shared experience for everyone involved. Delicate Arch Photographers

Try not to limit your creativity by simply capturing images of iconic places using the same composition as countless photographers before you. Arches National Park contains thousands of arches and vast expanses of breathtaking scenery just waiting for you to introduce your own personal style and interpretation. For those seeking solitude, Arches has much to offer beyond its iconic places. For example, consider a hike to Double O Arch, returning via the Primitive Trail, for some of the most spectacular scenery in the park. Just remember to bring enough memory cards to capture all of the great views!

Best Times / Locations to Photograph

Early Morning Late Afternoon
Moab Fault Park Avenue
The Three Gossips Courthouse Towers
Sheep Rock Petrified Dunes
The Great Wall Balanced Rock
Turret Arch The Garden of Eden
The Spectacles North and South Windows
Double Arch Delicate Arch (at end of main trail)
Cache Valley Fiery Furnace
Wolfe Ranch Skyline Arch
Landscape Arch Fins in Devil Garden
Double O Arch Tower Arch
Fiery Furnace in Arches National Park


Arches National Park

for Children and Families

Arches is a great family park. From the Visitor Center with its interpretive exhibits, orientation video and animal statues at the Visitor Center, to the rock formations, the Park will delight kids as well as adults, and hiking trails provide many opportunities for children to get out of the car and explore the arches up close.

Kid-Friendly Hikes

The following hikes are easy and safe hikes that will give kids a chance to stretch their legs and burn off energy.

Sand Dune Arch

Starting Point: Sand Dune Arch parking area (approximately 16 miles from entrance to park)
Length: 0.4 mile (0.6 km) round trip
Time: 15 to 30 minutes

Trail leads kids through a short slot-type canyon to a secluded arch among sandstone fins where they will find sand pouring in to a natural sandbox beneath.

The Windows

Starting Point: Windows parking area (11.7 miles from entrance)
Length: 1 mile (1.6 km) round trip
Time: 30 to 60 minutes

A gentle climb up a gravel loop trail leads to three massive arches (North and South Windows and Turret Arch). Kids can get right up under the arches for great photo opportunities. An alternate return, slightly longer, is by way of the primitive loop around the back of the two Windows. The primitive loop trail starts at the South Window viewpoint.

Balanced Rock

Starting Point: Balanced Rock Trail Head
Length: .3 mi (5. km) round trip
Time: 15-30 min

A loop trail around the base of a fragile, picturesque rock formation.

Delicate Arch Viewpoint

Starting Point: Delicate Arch Viewpoint Trail Head
Length: 100 yards (91 meters) round trip
Time: 10-15 min

In addition to the short accessible trail, another (moderately strenuous) hiking trail climbs one-half mile (0.8 km) toward Delicate Arch and ends at the rim of a steep canyon that separates the viewpoint from the arch.

Double Arch

Starting Point: Windows parking Area (11.7 miles from entrance)
Length: 0.5 mi (0.8 km) round trip
Time: 15-30 min

A relatively flat, sandy trail leads to the base of two giant arch spans which are joined at one end.

Skyline Arch

Starting Point: Skyline Arch parking area (approximately 17 miles from entrance to park)
Length: 0.4 mile (0.6 km) round trip
Time: 10 to 20 minutes

A short hike on a flat, well-defined trail. On a cold November night in 1940, a large chunk fell out of the arch, instantly doubling the size of its opening.

Junior Ranger Program

Free Junior Ranger booklets are available at the visitor center. Filled with fun activities, these books reveal the wonders of Arches to kids and parents alike. By completing five or more exercises, participants earn a Junior Ranger badge and signed certificate. Activities are designed for ages 6 to 12.

Kids also enjoy the short interpretive talks and walks offered spring through fall. Check at the Visitor’s Center for schedule.


Moab Attractions

Things To Do in Moab

In Moab, hikers set beneath a sandstone arch to watch the sunrise illuminate the sandstone desert. Mountain bikers ride out of town on pathways leading to some of the world’s greatest trail networks, river runners raft the world-renowned stretch of the Colorado River near Moab, and artists lay eyes upon some of Mother Nature’s greatest gifts. No matter what brings you to Moab, adventure awaits. 

Find Your Adventure


Hiking

Surrounded by two national parks, a state park, and seemingly endless stretches of public land, Moab has no shortage of hiking trails. Some wind through patches of light sand and sagebrush, some are a slickrock scramble, and others follow a river or creek beneath towering canyon walls. Depending on which trail calls to you, you may end up at the base of a famous landmark like Delicate Arch, or you may find solitude in some of the biggest stretches of undeveloped land anywhere in the U.S.

More on Hiking…

Hiking in Moab

Mountain Biking

In 1969 Richard Wilson designed a route that would lead motorcyclists along a 10 mile loop through valleys of slickrock and up short, punchy climbs. It didn’t take long for mountain bikers to venture out on the Slickrock Loop, which is now one of the most popular trails in the area. Since then, thanks to an ever growing network of trails that wind through some of the most unique mountain biking terrain anywhere in the world, Moab has become a bucket-list destination for mountain bikers.

More on Mountain Biking…

River Rafting

If you plan to visit Moab during the warmer months, river rafting should be near the top of your to-do list. The winding Colorado River has everything from sections of calm, paddle board friendly water to Class V rapids where the Colorado meets the Green River in Canyonlands National Park. There are quick, one-day routes like The Moab Daily, or multi-day ventures like a 5-day excursion through Desolation Canyon. To start planning your trip, get in touch with one of Moab’s local river rafting guides.

More on River Rafting…

Colorado River Rafting

Visit the Parks

Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, and Dead Horse Point State Park are all only about half an hour outside of downtown Moab. That means in a few days time you can explore the largest concentration of natural arches in the world, gaze upon the desolate Maze district, and visit one of the most photographed scenic vistas in the U.S. Even though the parks are all accessible in a day’s time, you could spend countless trips seeing all that the parks have to offer.

More on Arches National Park…
More on Canyonlands National Park…
More on Dead Horse Point State Park…

Camping

For many, Moab is a natural oasis. One where travelers can look upwards from their camp to clear dark skies where stars are not hidden behind the polluting light of nearby development. It’s a place where your family can gather around a campfire and share stories at a glamping resort. There are plenty of ways, and places, to camp in Moab. Set up a basecamp in either of the national parks for early access to the trails and overlooks, book a night at one of the many camping resorts, or find your own site in the surrounding BLM land.

More on Camping…

Moab Camping

Events & Art

After an evening spent in town it’s apparent how inspired, artistic, and passionate the locals of Moab are. Outdoor art exhibits are shown at nearly every street corner, and concerts, festivals and other events are almost always within reach. Yearly events like the Moab Folk Festival and Scots on the Rocks are a great way to experience Moab’s strong sense of community, a community that knows the importance of protecting their home so everyone can enjoy it for years to come. So, during your next vacation plan to save an evening for an art stroll or an event, and remember to Do It Like a Local.

Upcoming Events…
More on Arts…

Protect & Preserve Moab

Moab is one of the most beautiful destinations on the planet. From deep canyons to towering mountains, from breathtaking red rock landscapes to raging rivers, it guarantees astonishing vistas at every turn.  Protecting and preserving this precious area for future generations is essential.  When visiting, always stay on the trails, leave historic sites and rock art untouched, respect wildlife and always pack out what you pack in.

Recreate With Respect

More Activities in Moab


For most of us Moab conjures thoughts of warm days spent hiking, biking, floating, or simply basking in the sun perched on a red rock. It’s true, the summer months are the most popular time of year to visit; but the city is brimming with things to do year-round. New adventures ebb and flow with the desert’s long hot summer days and mild, incredible winter months. Explore the best aspects of each season below to discover the best time for your Moab vacation.

In the Spring | March – May

As days get longer and the red rock starts to warm, travelers from around the world visit Moab to shake off a cold winter. Midday temperatures generally reach 70ºF during the springtime, making it a perfect time of year to get outside! The trails come alive with wallflowers, paintbrush, and juniper, so have your camera at the ready for some incredible desert wildflower photography.

If it’s your first time visiting Moab (or far from it), be sure to pack your hiking boots. Trails like the Delicate Arch, Grandstaff Canyon, Corona Arch, and Fisher Towers Trails should be on every hiker’s to-do list. Mountain bikers can’t miss the famed Slickrock Trail or the Moab Brand trail network, both of which are usually in great condition come springtime. To add a little more adrenaline to your trip, schedule a four-wheeling tour with one of the guides in town.

Red desert flowers

Local’s Tips

  • Downtown Moab is full of locally owned guides, outfitters, artists, and restaurants – make sure to spend an evening wandering through town for a taste of the local lifestyle.
  • The way the desert seems to come to life under a rising sun is simply unforgettable. Wake up early, grab a bite to eat in town, and catch a sunrise from a red rock vista.

We’re committed to protecting the natural lands and historic artifacts in the Moab region. As you plan your next trip, we ask that you explore these simple steps towards traveling more responsibly and help us preserve Moab for generations to come.


Do It Like a Moab Local


In the Summer | June – August

During the hotter summer months people tend to head for the Colorado River or the La Sal Mountains to cool down. Temperatures can reach over 100ºF, so it’s best to get the day’s activity in during the early morning or in the early evening. Plus, you’ll want to save some energy to stay up and gaze into Moab’s starry night skies, which are some of the darkest anywhere in the world.

Long summer days lend themselves well to packed itineraries; just make sure you have plenty of water and sun protection. Escape the heat by camping at Warner Lake Campground in the La Sal Mountains, where less-traveled trails are within easy access. Or, head down to the Colorado River for some kayaking, white water rafting, or a relaxing moonlight cruise.

Local’s Tips

  • Make your way over to Swanny Park for free summer concerts every Friday night, starting July 10th.
  • Summer is the busiest time of year for the national parks. Avoid some of the traffic by visiting during the early morning or early evening.

In the Fall | September – November

Once the fall months come around Moab is in full bloom. The river has had some time to warm, the higher elevation trails are thawed, and temperatures drop back down to a comfortable 70ºF. Fall is a great time of year to hit the trails, visit the national parks, and camp along the Colorado River under Moab Canyon’s commanding red cliffs. Plus, up in the Manti-La Sal National Forest the trees start to take on their vivid fall colors.

For an experience you can’t find any other time of year, be sure to take a scenic drive on the La Sal Mountain Loop Road. It’s 63 miles in length, and should take nearly two hours to drive. Pack a picnic and take your time, the forest is incredible during the fall months. It’s also a perfect time for hikers to take to the trails, and mountain bikers can generally access all of the popular Whole Enchilada Trail, along with other higher elevation trails.<

Local’s Tips

  • Every November the Moab Folk Festival and Celtic Festival bring great music, food, and tradition to the red rocks. Make sure to plan some time to unwind in town at either of these great festivals.

In the Winter | December – February

Winter in Moab may be one of the city’s best kept secrets. The crowds dissipate and the red rock looks spectacular under snow. With temperatures between 40ºF and 50ºF, you’ll find the crisp air invigorating as you ramble down a hiking trail that you’ll practically have all to yourself.

Winter weather travelers can’t miss Onion Creek, which is roughly 20 miles up Moab Canyon on Highway 128. Take the drive (a four-wheel drive vehicle is recommended) for unbeatable photo opportunities of snow capped red rock outcroppings and a handful of great day hikes. Afterwards, spend some time exploring both Arches and Canyonlands National Parks; it’s a great time to see the most popular landmarks without the crowds.

Local’s Tips

  • Did you know you can ski in Moab? If you’re visiting during the winter months, pack your skis for some peaceful cross country skiing in the La Sal Mountains.

To start planning your next Moab vacation, learn more about monthly weather averages or explore places to stay while you’re here.


Guest Journalist: Mark

Mark & Mya in Arches National Park

In 2017 I flew from Australia to North America for the trip of a lifetime, the only difference between me and thousands of other Aussies, is I choose to take my dog along for the adventure. Since then we have traveled almost 80,000 km throughout North America. We have been across Canada, explored almost 40 states throughout the USA, and even made it to Mexico for a day. Initially we found getting information about travelling with a pet really difficult, so now we share pet-friendly travel tips and show people you can have a dog and a life of adventure and travel too. Together we have been skiing, snowboarding, backcountry touring, snowshoeing, fat and mountain biking, paddling, white water rafting and hiking.

During our time in Utah, we made it to Moab and absolutely fell in love with how beautiful the area is and the adventure on offer. We did some things quite well during our time there, but also could have done some things better, and thought we would share our top five tips for visiting Moab with a dog.

1. Know what you can and can’t do

During our time, we explored Arches National Park during the day and watched the sunset from the Island in the Sky in the Canyonlands National Park. Often people talk about the limitations you have going into a National Park with your dog, and although they existed, we were still able to see and do plenty from the areas we were allowed.

There are some differences between the two parks, so we suggest you check the current requirements for each park from the National Park Service’s website (click here), but in general dogs must be leashed at all times and you can have your dog with you:

  • On all park roads
  • In parking areas
  • In picnic areas
  • In the main campground

You can’t have your dog with you:

  • At any overlooks on any hiking trails,
  • Anywhere off-trails
  • In the visitor centre

As in all National Parks you are expected to clean up after your dog & not leave them unattended.

2. Plan for the heat

When we were exploring Moab it was really hot during the day. Summer temperatures reach 100°F regularly, so it is really important to plan your days accordingly. I made sure I carried plenty of water for both Mya and I, and had a collapsible light weight dog bowl for Mya to drink from. I also had a set of Ruffwear hiking boots for Mya, to stop her paws getting burnt on the hot ground. A good rule is, if you can’t put your hand on the ground for five seconds without burning it, then it is probably too hot for dogs to walk on bare paw. Just remember that different surfaces such as asphalt, concrete and soil will have different temperatures.

3. Utilize doggy day care when required

I would have liked to have been able to check out the Delicate Arch, but sadly I wasn’t able to see it whilst I had Mya with me, as it is a 30 minute hike and dogs aren’t permitted on the trail. The National Parks recommend against leaving pets in your car when temperatures are above 68°F, even with the windows cracked. With the heat we experienced, I would also discourage this and instead suggest arranging for some doggy day care. A list of boarding services can be found here, or talk to the team at the Moab Information Center (corner of Main & Center Streets in Moab) who can help you with recommendations.

4. Book your accommodation in advance

Be sure to book your accommodation well in advance. Initially we planned to camp in one of the national parks or Dead Horse Point State Park, but when we arrived, all the camp sites were booked out (If you arrive early enough, you may be able to get a non reserved site, but they do fill up fast). Additionally, if your dog is the type that is going to bark whenever they hear a noise outside of the tent, you might want to be considerate of others and look at alternative forms of pet friendly accommodation. We ended up staying at La Quinta in Moab, which as most of you know has a fantastic pet policy with no pet fees. Other pet friendly options we would recommend would by the Hyatt Place and Homewood Suites By Hilton. A complete list of pet-friendly accommodations can be found here.

5. Make Sure You Have Enough Time

Sadly we didn’t allocate enough time during our visit to make the most of the area. I would have loved to have checked out the dog friendly hike to the Corona Arch (I’ve seen some incredible photos and this is our biggest regret from Utah), a dog friendly hike through Dead Horse Point State Park, the Negro Bill Canyon trail and a rafting trip on the Green River or San Jan River with the Moab Rafting & Canoe Company; yes the company offers dog friendly rafting tours. I’ve also heard the mountain biking in Dead Horse State Park is great, but as dogs aren’t allowed on the mountain bike trails, it’s one you would need to arrange doggy day care for in advance. To make the most of the area I would recommend spending at least five days there, but if for whatever reason you can’t, I guess it just gives you a reason to head back.

Exploring Moab with Mya, made the experience so much more special. With so many amazing opportunities, Moab is definitely one of our favourite places in the USA, and with enough time and planning there is no reason why people should have to leave their furry friends behind.

Mark & Mya in Canyonlands National Park

Follow Mark & Mya’s continuing Adventures here: facebook.com/markandmyasadventures/


Accessibility in Moab

Accessible Park Trails and Facilities

Arches National Park

These areas are accessible to wheelchairs. All toilets in the park are accessible. Some trails are considered barrier free, which may contain minor obstacles, steeper grades, temporary washouts, and may require assistance. Rain and snow may cause ruts or other obstacles on the trail.

  • Park Avenue Viewpoint – Flat, paved surface to a viewpoint.
  • Balanced Rock – Flat, paved surface alongside Balanced Rock ends at a viewpoint.
  • Balanced Rock Picnic Area – Picnic area is paved. Toilets are across a gravel road. Toilets are accessible.
  • The Windows Trail – First 100 yards is flat, hardened surface and is considered barrier free. Nearby toilets, along a paved surface, are accessible.
  • Double Arch Trail – Relatively flat, hard-packed trail is considered barrier free.
  • Panorama Point – Viewpoint, picnic area, and stargazing area have paved surfaces. Toilets are accessible. Benches are available.
  • Delicate Arch Viewpoint – Viewpoint has a flat, packed gravel surface. Picnic area and sidewalks are paved. Toilets are accessible.
  • Wolfe Ranch – Path to Wolfe Ranch and petroglyph panel are flat with a gravel surface. Toilets are accessible.
  • Devils Garden Campground Amphitheater – Paved path connects parking area to the amphitheater with a view of Skyline Arch.
  • Devils Garden – Trail to Landscape Arch has a hard-packed surface and is considered barrier free, however the trail has steep slopes and may require assistance. Picnic area and trailhead have paved surfaces and accessible toilets.

Canyonlands National Park – Island in the Sky District

Canyonlands National Park has several areas that are accessible for people with physical or mobility disabilities. The road at Island in the Sky passes many accessible viewpoints and facilities.

Programs and Tours

  • Geology talks are offered at Grand View Point. A paved sidewalk leads from the parking lot to the program location, which is located off the sidewalk on a gravel surface. Seating on large boulders is available. Accessible toilets are nearby.
  • Rangers offer patio talks on the front porch of Island in the Sky Visitor Center. The area is paved and accessible to wheelchairs. Accessible toilets are nearby.

Campground

Island in the Sky Campground has one accessible campsite and nearby pit toilet. The campsite is reserved at all times for people with disabilities only. The campsite is paved with the exception of the tent pad, which is dirt. Paths to the toilet and campsite payment station are paved.

Trails and Facilities

These overlooks are accessible for people using a wheelchair:

  • Buck Canyon Overlook
  • Green River Overlook
  • Grand View Point Overlook
  • All toilets at Island in the Sky are accessible.

Dead Horse Point State Park

  • Wheelchair Accessible Restrooms
  • Wheelchair Accessible Visitor Center/Gift Shop with Elevator for Access to All Floors
  • Designated Wheelchair Accessible Parking Spaces
  • Wheelchair Accessible Pathways at Scenic Vistas Around Park
  • Wheelchair Accessible Viewpoint at Dead Horse Point
  • Designated Wheelchair Accessible Reservable Campsite
  • Wheelchair Accessible Day Use Pavilions
  • Wheelchair Accessible Yurt
  • Braille Astronomy Materials for Star Party and Dark Sky Program Attendees

Places like the National Ability Center can help people of all ability levels access the best of Moab’s outdoor recreational activities. Learn more about the National Ability Center at discovernac.org

State of Utah

  • If you are looking for accessible adventures throughout the state of Utah, check the Utah Office of Tourism’s Accessible Utah page.


With Moab’s endless adventures and sightseeing opportunities, planning a three-day getaway can seem overwhelming at first. The good news is that visiting Moab in the fall means reduced crowds, great off-season rates, and unmatched solitude. Moab’s moderate off-season temperatures and changing scenic landscape is spectacular, with rich autumn colors and occasionally snow-capped red rock peaks and cliffs. Here are a few can’t-miss activities to check out during your fall getaway to Moab.

Hike the National Parks

No matter the season, no three-day weekend trip to Moab is complete without visiting at least one of the two stunning nearby national parks, Arches and Canyonlands. The parks are open year-round, and while it is possible to take in the wonder of the wild attractions simply from your car window, you should opt to hike one of the many renowned trails, like to iconic Delicate Arch in Arches National Park, or through the winding paths of the Windows Area. You’ll enjoy cooler hiking weather, fewer crowds, and the feeling that you have a national park all to yourself (and, you really might).

Visit Dead Horse Point State Park

While Arches and Canyonlands deservedly stand out when it comes to must-see Moab destinations, Dead Horse Point State Park, located near Canyonlands, shouldn’t be overlooked. You should especially consider visiting the park if you are bringing your four-legged friend, as it is largely a dog-friendly destination. Dead Horse Point sits on a high plateau and features a vast canyon rim where you can sightsee for miles. At night, the state park transforms into a certified International Dark Sky Park, where you’ll more than likely lose track of counting shooting stars. It’s also worth taking advantage of park-staff-guided events like full moon hikes and star parties that happen on a semi-regular basis, pending weather and other restrictions (be sure to check at the visitor center.)

Arches National Park HikerFamily Hiking in Arches National Park

Enjoy a (Mostly) Leisurely River Trip

Colorado River ActivitiesRafting and Kayaking on the Colorado River Near Moab

The Colorado and Green rivers are responsible for helping carve the winding landscapes that define the Moab terrain, and there’s no better way to see the sculpted walls of the Colorado Plateau than up close and personal in a river raft. While rafting trips on the Green River typically close by the fall season, guided trips on the Colorado don’t end until water levels get too low in late October. Fall is the preferred time of year for many three-day weekend visitors to take a trip down the storied river, as the later months offer a mellower experience without the extreme thrills that often come with tumultuous summertime rapids. Enjoy a rafting trip at a (relatively) leisure pace, giving you more time to admire the red rock pinnacles, wildlife, and petroglyphs visible near the river’s edge. Rafting tours vary in length from a few hours long to multi-day trips.

Cover More Ground on a Mountain Bike

There’s a lot to see in Moab’s immense wilderness, and renting a mountain bike (at any number of outdoor retailers on Main Street) might be the solution to exploring as much backcountry as possible on your weekend getaway. Seasoned mountain bikers come from far and wide to enjoy Moab’s endless trail systems, but mountain biking is accessible for people of all experience levels, particularly when visiting with such pleasant temperatures. Are you traveling with a group with varying mountain biking experience? Check out the Bar-M Loop, a scenic, accessible beginner trail that’s open year-round and connects to several more advanced trails, should the experienced biker in the group wish to break off to conquer more technical terrain.

Mountain Biking near MoabMountain Biking on the Klondike Bluff Trail near Moab

Follow the Cowboys

Saddle up! Get off the beaten path and step back in time to experience the spiraling towers and river valleys of Moab’s sandstone vistas on a horseback riding tour – taking the same paths as some of history’s most (in)famous cowboys. Professional wranglers will guide you through these scenic, open-range trails, which meander through hallowed Western ground and take you everywhere from the vast Castle Rock and Castle Valley, to Fisher Towers, to the banks and creeks of the Colorado River. There are a range of tours available, from 90-minute rides to half-day adventures. It might be difficult to take your eyes off the infinite landscape as your guide points out historic desert hideouts, along with more contemporary Western movie sets. Most tours run through November—note that fall temperatures can fluctuate significantly, so be prepared with layering options (flannels and cowboy hats not provided.)

To find out more visit discovermoab.com.

Horseback Riding in Moab


Moab Photography

Tips for Capturing the Beauty of Red Rock Country

National Parks Photographer Frank Lee Ruggles talks about photographing the Moab area, including Arches and Canyonlands National Parks and Dead Horse Point State Park. Presented in stunning 4K!

Introduction

The Moab area is a paradise for photographers. Under conditions of constantly changing light, Moab’s red rock landscapes provide limitless photographic opportunities. Often, the difference between an average photograph and an exceptional photograph, is good lighting.

Evening light paints the rock with colors much more vivid and rich than would be seen in the middle of the day.

Lighting

The right time of day can make all of the difference when it comes to photography in the Moab area. Certainly the best time of day for photography is during sunrise or sunset, when the red rocks seem to glow with intense color. However, since you can’t be everywhere at the same time, simply avoiding the flat light on cloudless days between 10:00 am & 3:00 pm will go a long way toward getting some great shots. With all of our amazing rock formations, a lower sun angle can add real depth to your photos. If you absolutely must take photos during midday, try slightly underexposing your red rock photos by 1/3rd to 2/3rd of a stop. (Many cameras have exposure compensation buttons that allow you to easily do this.) Our red sandstone is darker than it may appear to the naked eye and cameras tend to overexpose it in bright light.

Clouds – A Utah Photographer’s Best Friend

Dramatic cloud formations, along with the shadows that they cast, can add real depth to a photograph. If the sky has scattered clouds, just about any time of day is great for photography around Moab. If you are lucky enough to be here during a passing storm, count your blessings!

Stormy weather almost always results in great photos. Our vast panoramic views are truly spectacular when a sunbeam bursts out of a cloud. In addition, the color of sandstone can really intensify when it is wet.

A passing storm as seen from the Fiery Furnace Viewpoint in Arches National Park

An overlook provides the perfect vista for a breathtaking photo.

Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park & Dead Horse Point State Park

Low sun angles at sunrise and sunset add tremendous color and depth to the views from the Island in the Sky. Because of the vast distances seen at the overlooks, morning views often have calm atmospheric conditions and thus have less haze than late day views. Scattered clouds, and the shadows that they cast, can also add depth to any image. Passing storms often provide extremely dramatic lighting as well.

Arches National Park

Arches gives you the most photographic flexibility of any park in southeastern Utah. Good photographs are possible at just about any time of the day. Because you will be wandering around many colossal sandstone formations, you can usually find to find a good angle for lighting. Pay attention to shadows, since these are what will add depth and interest to your photos.

View of the La Sal Mountains from the Windows Section of Arches National Park during sunset.

Time of Day

When the sun angles become very low, there are some preferred locations in the park. Below are the best times to photograph some of the major features in Arches:

EARLY MORNING
  • Moab Fault
  • The Three Gossips
  • Sheep Rock
  • The Great Wall
  • Turret Arch
  • The Spectacles
  • Double Arch
  • Cache Valley
  • Wolfe Ranch
  • Landscape Arch
  • Double O Arch
LATE AFTERNOON
  • Park Avenue
  • Courthouse Towers
  • Petrified Dunes
  • Balanced Rock
  • The Garden of Eden
  • The Windows
  • Tower Arch
  • Fiery Furnace
  • Skyline Arch
  • Fins in Devils Garden
  • Delicate Arch (at end of main trail)

Delicate Arch – Not Just for Photographers

Over one million people visit Arches National Park every year, and just about everyone wants to see all of the major views within the park. One of the most heavily visited arches is Delicate Arch. As a result of its popularity, you should always expect to see people surrounding this world famous arch. Although it may occasionally happen, it is unrealistic to expect a solitary experience around Delicate Arch. Be courteous to other visitors during your visit to the arch, and do not expect people to move away from this world famous landmark during your photographs. Remember that not everyone who visits this arch is a photographer. Most people simply want to experience the joy of standing next to such a beautiful landmark. People can add scale to any photo of Delicate Arch, so make your visit a great shared experience for everyone involved.

Try not to limit your creativity by simply capturing images of iconic places using the same composition as countless photographers before you. Arches National Park contains thousands of arches and vast expanses of breathtaking scenery just waiting for you to introduce your own personal style and interpretation. For those seeking solitude, Arches has much to offer. For example, consider a hike to Double O Arch, returning via the Primitive Trail, for some of the most spectacular scenery in the park. Just remember to bring enough memory cards to capture all of the great views!

Read more…

Delicate Arch is one of the most photographed of Utah’s natural wonders.

Autumn Foliage

View of the La Sal Mountains from the Windows Section of Arches National Park during sunset.

One of the best places to view autumn foliage in the Moab area is in the La Sal Mountains, located approximately 20 miles south of town. Foliage usually starts to change in mid-September and continues into early October. The La Sal Mountain Loop Road is the easiest way to view the foliage change.

The La Sal Mountain Loop Road, suitable for all passenger cars and RV’s, features a wide variety of canyon country scenery. The 60-mile route begins by following the Colorado River along Highway 128. It then approaches the La Sal Mountains via Castle Valley. The route through the Manti-La Sal National Forest offers great views of the 12,000 foot plus peaks and the red rock canyons far below. Completion of the loop brings the motorist back to Moab via U. S. Highway 191.

Read more…

Picturing Moab

From ancient images to modern pursuits, getting drawn in to Moab. Read more…


Moab 360


Rock Art Protection

Rock art sites on federal lands are nationally protected areas. The art is extremely fragile and once damaged, the site can never be repaired to its original condition. Please avoid even touching the rock surface. Surprising as it may seem, the oils in a single handprint can chemically affect the rock surface. Take care so that future generations may marvel at these fragile and beautiful remains of the past. If you happen to come across some rock art in your travels around the Moab area please observe the following precautions:

Site Visiting Etiquette

  • Don’t touch, in any way, the rock art or surfaces around it. The oils in your skin may cause damage to rock art. Don’t apply any substance to the rock art surface, including water or any other fluids. Don’t trace images with sticks, stones, chalk, or other substances.
  • Scratching on rocks causes irreparable damage and is illegal.
  • Don’t attempt to remove graffiti, chalking, lichen, bird droppings, or anything else from rock art.
  • Don’t collect or disturb artifacts or features at a rock art site. It is acceptable to pick up surface artifacts, examine and enjoy them, or make sketches or take photos of them, as long as they’re returned to the place where found, and no damage is done to the artifact.
  • Don’t remove soil to expose subsurface rock art or archeology.
  • Minimize the number of vehicles going to a site. Stay on existing roads and trails. Do not “pioneer” vehicle trails or parking areas. By disturbing rocks, vegetation, or biological soil crusts you may cause unknowing damage to fragile archaeological sites.
  • Don’t camp or build fires within 1/4 mile of a rock art site, even if the landowner or public land manager permits camping.
  • Don’t allow children, pets, or inattentive people to behave carelessly around rock art sites. Kicking up dust or dislodging rocks can cause damage to the site.
  • Please remember that many living people consider these sites sacred.
  • Speak out when needed to prevent damage to rock art. Report new rock art destruction, charcoal near the site, or site vandalism to the Archaeological Resources Protection Act hotline @ 1-800-227-7286.

Recreate Responsibly

Our public lands are very fragile and have taken millions of years to develop. We ask that you recreate responsibly while visiting Moab to respect, protect, and preserve our incredible landscape. Recreating responsibly in Moab will ensure that future generations can have the same incredible experience you are enjoying. Click on the symbol below to learn more.

Recreate Responsibly

Sites

  • Birthing Scene
  • Courthouse Wash Rock Art
  • Golf Course Rock Art
  • Kane Creek Blvd. Rock Art Site
  • Potash Road Rock Art Sites
  • Sego Canyon
  • Wolfe Ranch Rock Art

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