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sand flats recreation area

Sand Flats Recreation Area

World Renowned Trails Offer Beautiful Scenery and Incredible Challenges

Introduction

The Sand Flats Recreation Area (SFRA) near Moab, Utah is a nationally significant public lands treasure at the heart of the Colorado Plateau. A high plain of slickrock domes, bowls and fins, it rises in the east to meet the colorful mesas and nearly 13,000 foot peaks of the La Sal Mountains. Bordering the area on the north and south are the canyons of the Grandstaff and Mill Creek Wilderness Study Areas. Further north lies the deep gorge of the Colorado River and Arches National Park. Sand Flats’ famous Slickrock and Porcupine Rim bike trails and almost 40 miles of 4×4 trails are world-renowned for their combination of challenge and awesome scenery. Sand Flats is also popular for camping. Over 200,000 visitors enjoy this 9,000-acre recreation area annually. The Sand Flats Recreation Area is managed through a unique partnership between Grand County and the Bureau of Land Management. In 1995 this area was developed through the collaborative efforts of Americorps, the Bureau of Land Management, Grand County and the Moab community. SFRA’s mission is to protect the natural features of the area from adverse recreational impacts while providing access to sustainable and enjoyable recreational opportunities.

50 Years of Slickrock

Resources

Brochure

Sand Flats Recreation Area Visitor Guide

Sand Flats on the Web

Visit the Sand Flats Recreation Area on the web at grandcountyutah.net or on Facebook.

Other Bike Rides

Moab offers a huge variety of rides. From trails for beginners looking for a scenic ride through beautiful canyons and mesa tops, to highly technical trails. The new MOAB Brand Trails: Bar M, Circle O, Rockin’A, and Bar B, offer everything from easy winding dirt roads to miles of intermediate slickrock. Read more…

Bike Safety

The Moab area offers challenging riding amidst world-class scenery. The characteristics of the area that make it a special place for riding also make it extremely important to follow basic safety procedures. The Moab Bike Patrol has this to say:

Wear a helmet

Most trails are very rocky. Even the best riders can get tired and make mistakes. Helmets can prevent or reduce the severity of head injuries.

Carry lots of water and high-energy food.

At least a gallon of water is recommended per person per day. There is no water on the trails and summer temperatures often climb above 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Running out of water will put your health at risk. Eating at intervals provides an opportunity to rest and the energy needed to complete the ride.

Carry trail maps and know how to use them to track your position

Maps for all bike and 4×4 trails are available at the Entrance station and all trailheads. Detailed topographic maps are available in Moab at bike shops, bookstores and the Moab Information Center.

Stay found, save money.

Grand County has the highest incidence of search and rescue in Utah. The high cost of these operations is normally the responsibility of the rescued party. If you decide that you have lost the trail, do not continue on in hopes of finding your own way. Retrace your route back towards the trailhead until you pick up the trail, find someone who knows the area, or return to the trailhead. If you cannot retrace your route, stay put, conserve energy and water, make yourself visible and await rescue. It’s always a good idea to let a friend or relative know beforehand where you are going and when you should return. If something goes wrong you have the comfort of knowing that they will get help.

Check your bike frequently.

Riding in Moab trails loosens headsets and puts maximum stress upon frames and components. Frequent inspections reduce the possibility of injury. Be prepared in case of emergency.

Don’t venture into remote areas with nothing but a t-shirt and shorts.

Carry a windbreaker, sunscreen, sunglasses, maps, matches or lighter, pump, patch kit, first-aid kit, a good bike tool kit and extra food, water and clothing.

Ride with someone else and stay together in case of problems.

Discuss your situation calmly and make a plan to improve it.

Vehicle Safety

Let someone know your itinerary.

First and foremost it’s always a good idea to let a friend or relative know beforehand where you are going and when you should return. If something goes wrong you have the comfort of knowing that they will get help.

Travel with another vehicle.

You chances of getting stuck in the backcountry are reduced with two vehicles and if one breaks down you have a way out.

Carry trail maps and know how to use them to track your position.

Maps for Slickrock and Porcupine Rim trails are located at the trailheads and entrance station. Maps for 4WD roads are available at the entrance station. Detailed topographic maps and guidebooks are available in Moab at bike shops, bookstores and the Moab Information Center. If you decide that you have lost the trail, do not continue on in hopes of finding your own way. Retrace your route back towards the trailhead until you pick up the trail. Changing conditions. Directional signs may be removed or vandalized. New roads can spring up. Use your map or guidebook but exercise common sense when discrepancies occur.

Inspect your vehicle.

Before going in the backcountry make sure that your vehicle it is in top operating condition. Drive or ride Safe and Sober. It is illegal in Utah for any occupant of a vehicle to drink or even open an alcoholic beverage. Please remember to buckle up. Maximum speed limit on all Sand Flats trails is 15 mph. On all other public lands maximum speed limit is 25 mph on 4×4 trails.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I get to the Sand Flats Recreation Area?
The Sand Flats Recreation Area is located near Moab, Utah.
To get to the Sand Flats Recreation Area from the north and Interstate 70 take exit 182 toward Moab. Merge onto US-191 and go 31 miles to the third traffic light. At the light turn left onto 100 North. Proceed ½ mile and turn right onto 400 East. Go ½ mile and turn left at Dave’s Corner Market onto Millcreek Drive. Proceed for ½ mile to stop sign. Go straight at stop sign onto the Sand Flats Road that continues up a hill for 2 1/2 miles to the Entrance Booth.
To get to the Sand Flats Recreation Area from south of Moab on U.S. 191 turn right at first traffic light onto 400 East. Proceed for 1 mile to Dave’s Corner Market and Millcreek Drive. Make a right onto Millcreek Drive and proceed for ½ mile to stop sign. Go straight at stop sign onto the Sand Flats Road that continues up a hill for 2 1/2 miles to the Entrance Booth.

Who manages the Sand Flats Recreation Area?
The Sand Flats Recreation Area is managed through a unique partnership between Grand County and the Bureau of Land Management. In 1995, in response to repeated health and resource violations. this area was developed through the collaborative efforts of Americorps, the BLM, Grand County and the Moab community.

You can help our unique partnership efforts by taking responsibility for the lands you enjoy. Learn the guidelines of sustainable land use by:

  • Understanding how your use affects the land
  • Adopting minimum impact practices
  • Sharing in the costs of services, education and maintenance

What is the user fee at the Sand Flats Recreation Area?
Sand Flats offers a few different types of day use passes. Enter in a private vehicle and you have the option of purchasing a 1 day pass for $5 or a 7 day pass for $10. Enter by bicycle, motorcycle or via shuttle and the cost is $2 per day or $5 for 7 days. Sand Flats also charges a vehicle trailer fee of $5.

Does my federal or state pass work at Sand Flats?
The Sand Flats Recreation Area (SFRA) is managed by Grand County in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management. SFRA functions as a self-sustaining entity with its operating budget derived entirely from collected fees and does not receive tax dollars from Grand County or the Bureau of Land Management. Since day to day management of the Sand Flats Recreation Area is performed by Grand County, federal passes are not accepted. State passes are not accepted because the Sand Flats Recreation Area is not part of the Utah State Park system.

Where do my fees go?
All user fees remain in this program and go toward services, maintenance and improvements. Services include staffing the Entrance Station, campground and backcountry patrols, educational displays, brochures and maps. General maintenance includes upkeep of campgrounds, toilet facilities, trails, fences, signs and associated materials.

User fees also sustain an apprenticeship program that provides work-study opportunities for local high school students. Collected fees help to support the operation of Grand County Search and Rescue. Funds are also used for matching grants to improve trailheads, trails and campground facilities.

Does Sand Flats have an annual pass? How do I purchase a pass?
Yes, Sand Flats sells an annual pass for $25. The pass admits the card-holder and passengers in a single, private vehicle for day use through the last day of the month and year indicated on the pass. When entry is by bicycle, motorcycle or shuttle van, this pass covers card-holder and accompanying family members. This pass does not cover camping. This pass is non-transferable and nonrefundable.

One can purchase a pass at the Entrance Station from March through October. Year round a pass can be purchased at the Grand County Clerk’s office in the Grand County Courthouse, 125 East Center St., Moab, Utah, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. Closed holidays. 

Can I camp at the Sand Flats Recreation Area and what does it cost?
Yes, Sand Flats has 140 individual campsites, open year round and offered on a first-come, first-serve basis (non-reservable). Camping is limited to these designated sites spread over nine campgrounds ranging from 4500 to 5700 feet in elevation. Campsite amenities include picnic tables, metal fire rings and nearby vault toilets. Campers need to bring in all their drinking water, as water is not available.

Some campsites can accommodate RVs. The best choices are in campgrounds Alcove (A), Bobcat (B), Echo (E), and Juniper. There are no hook-ups. Learn more about Sand Flats Recreation Area camping.
Camping at Sand Flats costs $15 per night, per car for up to 5 people. Additional persons cost $2 each per night. A $5 vehicle trailer fee per night also applies.

What are the Sand Flats Recreation Area camping regulations?
Camping Rules, Regulations and Other Information

  • Camp only in a designated site. 10 people, 2 vehicles maximum per site
  • Park motorized vehicles in designated parking area
  • Tents must be on tent pad or within rock lined area and no more than 30′ from metal fire ring. 
  • Build fires in metal fire ring only. Gathering or cutting of firewood is prohibited. No wood pallets. Do not put rocks or trash in the fire ring. Fires must be cold to the touch when you leave camp. Use water to put your fire out, not sand
  • Use toilet facilities
  • Quiet Hours: 10 p.m. to 8 a.m. No generator use from 8 pm to 8 am
  • For after hour noise disturbance, call Grand County Sheriff’at 435-259-8115
  • Dogs must be attended and kept under restraint. Please clean up after your pet. 
  • No discharging of firearms or fireworks
  • Campsite checkout time is 11 a.m.
  • Camping is limited to 14 days within a 30 day period 
  • A trash dumpster is located at the Slickrock Bike trail parking lot.  
  • Operation of motorized vehicle or mountain bike off designated roads and trails is a class A misdemeanor punishable by fine, imprisonment and/or forfeiture of vehicle. There are no open play areas, campground included. 
  • The Fins and Things 4×4 trail section that lies south of the Sand Flats road is open for Day Use Only and restricted one half hour before sunset until one half hour after sunrise. 
  • Maximum speed on 4×4 trails is 15 MPH.
  • Drive or Ride Safe and Sober
  • To report off road travel or vandalism call Grand County Sheriff at 435-259-8115
  • Emergencies call 911
  • Dumping: None
  • Water: None

Does Sand Flats take group site reservations?

  • Yes, Sand Flats has six reservable group campsites with four located in the Datura (D) campground and two located in the Echo (E) campground. 
  • The reservation fee is $8. The camping fee is $60 per night. 
  • The sites will accommodate 16 people. For more information on vehicle size limitations please go to Group Site Reservations below. All vehicles and trailers must fit within the assigned parking area.
  • The group leader is responsible for being familiar with all of the Rules and Regulations of the Sand Flats Recreation Area and for ensuring other members of the group adhere to these rules. The group may be asked to leave by the Management for major noise complaints, facility or resource damage. The leader may receive a citation for excessive noise during quiet hours, or substantial resource or facility damage to the site.
  • If you would like to reserve a site please go to Group Site Reservations. If you have a group larger than 16 people and want to reserve a group campsite in the area you can call the BLM at 435-259-2100 or visit Moab BLM group campsites .

What is minimum impact?
Each year, millions of visitors enjoy Canyon Country. The impact of so much use is threatening the area’s biological resources. You can help protect this fragile and beautiful land by following minimum-impact practices.

  • Tread lightly when traveling and leave no trace of your camping.
  • Drive and ride only on roads and trails where such travel is allowed; hike only on established trails, on rock or in washes.
  • Avoid taking shortcuts and traveling through biological soil crusts.
  • When camping do not place your tent on top of vegetation.
  • Select an area of bare soil for your tent. .
  • Use existing fire rings and bring in your own firewood.
  • Do not strip bark, cut or break off tree limbs.
  • Wood collecting of any kind is illegal at the Sand Flats Recreation Area.
  • Please remember these trees provide shade and shelter for you, other campers and the animals that make the desert their home.
  • Help keep Canyon Country clean.
  • Pack out your trash and recycle it, clean up after less thoughtful visitors, and use toilets.
  • Protect and conserve scarce desert water sources.
  • Leave potholes undisturbed.
  • Allow space for wildlife.
  • When encountering wildlife, maintain your distance and remain quiet.
  • Teach children not to chase or pick up animals.
  • Keep pets under control.

What is biological soil crust?
Biological soil crust is a living crust of cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), bacteria, algae, lichen, mosses and fungi that covers much of the soil surface in this area. It is almost invisible in its early stages. As it matures, it develops a bumpy, blackish surface. The crust is essential to desert life. It holds sand together, retains water, and makes nutrients needed for larger plants to grow.

It takes over 100 years for the crust to reach full development, yet tire tracks and footsteps can crush it instantaneously. Bike and vehicle tire tracks are especially damaging because they form ruts. When it rains water flows in these ruts causing severe erosion. Drive or bike only on open roads or trails. When hiking cross-country, walk on slickrock or in dry washes to avoid trampling biological soil crust.

What are the Sand Flats Recreation Area day use regulations?

  • The right to use public lands comes with the responsibility of caring for those lands.
  • Operation of motorized vehicle or mountain bike off designated roads and trails is a class A misdemeanor punishable by fine, imprisonment and/or forfeiture of vehicle. To report off road travel or vandalism call 435-259-8115.
  • Drive or Ride Safe and Sober.
  • Maximum speed on 4X4 trails is 15 MPH.
  • The Fins and Things 4×4 trail section that lies south of the Sand Flats road is open for Day Use Only and restricted one half hour before sunset until one half hour after sunrise.
  • There are no open play areas, campgrounds included.
  • Parking is provided in designated areas. Do not park on vegetation or on roadside shoulders.
  • Do not litter. A trash dumpster and recycling bin is located at the Slickrock Bike Trail parking lot.
  • Use toilets located at trailheads and in campgrounds.
  • No Shooting or Fireworks.
  • For emergencies call 911.
  • Dogs must be kept under restraint. No unattended dogs. Please clean up after your pet. 

What do I need to know for playing it safe when riding my bike at Sand Flats?
The Moab area offers challenging riding amidst world-class scenery. The characteristics of the area that make it a special place for riding also make it extremely important to follow basic safety procedures. The Moab Bike Patrol has this to say:
Wear a helmet. Most trails are very rocky. Even the best riders can get tired and make mistakes. Helmets can prevent or reduce the severity of head injuries. Carry lots of water and high-energy food. At least a gallon of water is recommended per person per day. There is no water on the trails and summer temperatures often climb above 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Running out of water will put your health at risk. Eating at intervals provides an opportunity to rest and the energy needed to complete the ride.

Carry trail maps and know how to use them to track your position. Maps for Slickrock and Porcupine Rim trails are located at the trailheads and entrance station. Detailed topographic maps are available in Moab at bike shops, bookstores and the Moab Information Center. Stay found, save money. Grand County has the highest incidence of search and rescue in Utah. If you decide that you have lost the trail, do not continue on in hopes of finding your own way. Retrace your route back towards the trailhead until you pick up the trail, find someone who knows the area, or return to the trailhead. If you cannot retrace your route, stay put, conserve energy and water, make yourself visible and await rescue. It’s always a good idea to let a friend or relative know beforehand where you are going and when you should return. If something goes wrong you have the comfort of knowing that they will get help.


Check your bike frequently. Riding in Moab trails loosens headsets and puts maximum stress upon frames and components. Frequent inspections reduce the possibility of injury. Be prepared in case of emergency. Don’t venture into remote areas with nothing but a t-shirt and shorts. Carry a windbreaker, sunscreen, sunglasses, maps, matches or lighter, pump, patch kit, first-aid kit, a good bike tool kit and extra food, water and clothing. Ride with someone else and stay together in case of problems. Discuss your situation calmly and make a plan to improve it.

Where can I ride my e-bike at Sand Flats?
E-Bikes are considered motorized vehicles on public lands, therefore they are prohibited on non-motorized trail sections, such as the single-track portions of the Porcupine Rim/Whole Enchilada trail systems. E-Bikes are welcome on the Slickrock Bike Trail and on all of the 4×4 trails in Sand Flats. Remember that motorized traffic yields to non-motorized traffic. Please note that travel is limited to designated trails and that cross-country travel is not permitted. Stay on the trail. Pack it in. Pack it out. Responsible recreation keeps this trail clean, scenic and OPEN.  

How difficult is mountain biking on the Slickrock Bike trail?
The Slickrock Bike trail is rated as difficult. Terrain consist of rugged and rolling sandstone with occasional sandy spots. It’s steep inclines and descents offer technical challenges to the most experienced bikers. The 1.7 mile practice loop is recommended for all first time visitors. It is still rated as difficult and not for novice riders or young children. Be aware of narrow ledges, abrupt drop-offs and cliffs. Tough spots may require walking bikes. Due to numerous steep ascents, many mountain bikers need 3-4 hours to complete the trail. Motorcyclists need 1 plus hours. Beware of vehicles as the trail crosses Hell’s Revenge 4×4 trail six times. The trail is marked with white dashes painted on the rock surface. Please note that travel is limited to designated trails and that cross-country travel is not permitted. The trail is closed to ATVs and 4x4s.

What is the Porcupine Rim Trail like?
The "other mountain biking trail" at SFRA is the Porcupine Rim Trail, popular and difficult in it’s own right. The west trailhead is located on the eastern end of SFRA, 7 miles up the Sand Flats road from the Entrance Station.

The first part of the trail is popular with motorcycles and jeeps. At mile 8.6 the trail becomes single track with steep ledges and is suitable only for biking and hiking. All motorized vehicles must turn around at this point including e-bikes. The official trail length from the trailhead to highway 128 is 14.4 miles but because it is a one-way trail, without a shuttle, it is 30 miles round trip. The trail offers a variety of riding surfaces in a remote and rugged area of outstanding scenery.

Please note that travel is limited to designated trails and that cross-country travel is not permitted. Stay on the trail. Pack it in. Pack it out. Responsible recreation keeps this trail clean, scenic and open.

What is the LPS trail?
The higher entry point for the Porcupine Rim Trail within the Sand Flats Recreation Area is the Lower Porcupine Single-track or LPS trail. The LPS trailhead is at the Manti La Sal National Forest boundary, 11 miles east of the Sand Flats Entrance Station on the Sand Flats road. No motorized vehicles, which includes e-bikes, are permitted on LPS. 

The LPS trail is technically challenging. The trail splits into a rim ride section and the Notch section. The Notch is for experts only. The rim ride section has an entry drop that is difficult. Most hoof it over these obstacles. The trail has numerous drops and slickrock to negotiate. Average grade is 11%. LPS is the 5th ride of the Whole Enchilada. For more information see the Whole Enchilada map. 

Where can I hike at Sand Flats?
Hiking areas and trails include the Slickrock Bike Trail Practice Loop, the Pinyon Interpretive Hiking Trail, the Juniper Hiking Trail and the Porcupine Rim to Castle Valley overlook route. Trails range in length from 1 to 5 miles or more. See Hiking section. 

Does Sand Flats have 4×4 trails?
Moab’s Four-wheel drive trails are world renowned for their combination of challenge and awesome scenery. Two main trails for 4x4s at the Sand Flats Recreation Area are the Fins and Things 4×4 Trail and the Hell’s Revenge 4×4 Trail both rated difficult. Stock vehicles are not recommended on the Hell’s Revenge Trail. A stock vehicle can be on the Fins and Things 4×4 Trail if it has good articulation, high ground clearance, and adequate front and rear approach angles.

Please note that travel is limited to designated trails and that cross-country travel is not permitted. The Moab area offers literally thousands of miles of old roads. Stay on the trails and leave the scenery for others to enjoy. Tracking the landscape is one of the most lasting forms of damage. 

Do not trample vegetation or biological soil crusts. Avoid driving in potholes. Respect all living things. The desert is an irreplaceable gift. Pack it in. Pack it out. Responsible recreation keeps this trail clean, scenic and open. For current OHV regulations please visit Utah State Parks.

What are some safety tips for traveling in the Sand Flats backcountry by motorized vehicle?
Let someone know your itinerary. First and foremost it’s always a good idea to let a friend or relative know beforehand where you are going and when you should return. If something goes wrong you have the comfort of knowing that they will get help. Travel with another vehicle. Your chances of getting stuck in the backcountry are reduced with two vehicles; if one breaks down you have a way out.

Carry trail maps and know how to use them to track your position. Maps for all trails are located at trailheads and the entrance station. Detailed topographic maps and guidebooks are available in Moab at bike shops, bookstores and the Moab Information Center.

If you decide that you have lost the trail, do not continue on in hopes of finding your own way. Retrace your route back towards the trailhead until you pick up the trail. Changing conditions- Directional signs may be removed or vandalized. New roads can spring up. Use your map or guidebook but exercise common sense when discrepancies occur.

Inspect your vehicle. Before going in the backcountry make sure that your vehicle it is in top operating condition. Drive or ride safe and sober. It is illegal in Utah for any occupant of a vehicle to drink or even open an alcoholic beverage. Please remember to buckle up.

Where can I ride my ATV at Sand Flats?
All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) are permitted on all 4×4 trails at Sand Flats, however the Hell’s Revenge and the first 2 miles of the Fins and Things trail are not recommended. The first 8.6 miles of the Porcupine Rim trail are open to ATVs but still rated as difficult. The Slickrock Bike Trail is open to motorcycles and bicycles and is closed to all four-wheeled vehicles.

Remember that motorized traffic yields to non-motorized traffic. Please note that travel is limited to designated trails and that cross-country travel is not permitted. Stay on the trail. Pack it in. Pack it out. Responsible recreation keeps this trail clean, scenic and OPEN. For current OHV regulations please visit www.stateparks.utah.gov.

Where can I ride my UTV at Sand Flats?
UTVs or Utility Terrain Vehicles are welcome on all the same trails as 4×4’s at the Sand Flats Recreation Area. UTVs are prohibited on the Slickrock Bike Trail and the single-track portions of the Porcupine Rim/Whole Enchilada trail system. Remember that motorized traffic yields to non-motorized traffic. Please note that travel is limited to designated trails and that cross-country travel is not permitted. Stay on the trail. Pack it in. Pack it out. Responsible recreation keeps this trail clean, scenic and OPEN. For current OHV regulations please visit www.stateparks.utah.gov.

Where can I ride my motorcycle at Sand Flats?
Motorcycles are permitted on the Slickrock Bike Trail. In fact, the trail was originally designed in 1969 for motorcycles. SFRA also offers over 40 miles of 4×4 trails that motorcycles are welcome to ride. These include Fins and Things 4×4 Trail, Porcupine 4×4, Hells Revenge Trail and the first 8.6 miles of the Porcupine Rim Trail. Please note that the Porcupine Rim single-track and LPS single-track are non-motorized.

Remember that motorized traffic yields to non-motorized traffic. Please note that travel is limited to designated trails and that cross-country travel is not permitted. Stay on the trail. Pack it in. Pack it out. Responsible recreation keeps these trails clean, scenic and open. For current OHV regulations please visit Utah State Parks.

Can I bring my dog?
Yes, but please note that Grand County "Animal Care and Control" code does apply.

  • All dogs shall be kept under restraint.
  • No owner shall fail to exercise proper care and control of his or her animals to prevent them from becoming a public nuisance.

In the campground animals must be on a leash secured to a fixed object or under the control of a person or otherwise physically restricted at all times. In the backcountry dogs need to be under restraint and not chase or harass people or wildlife. No unattended dogs.

Helpful Information for Dog Owners

  • A good place to take your dog for a walk is to hike one of the less used 4×4 trails such as the Porcupine 4×4 trail or Porcupine Rim trail.
  • If you are riding one of the bike trails leave your dog at one of the Moab kennels listed below.
  • Most dogs are not used to running on sandstone, which acts like sandpaper on their paws.
  • Never leave your dog in a parked car; temperatures rise to dangerously high levels quickly in the desert.
  • Owners should carry water for their pet.
  • Owners need to clean up after their pet. 

Moab Veterinary Clinic: 435-259-8710. Karen’s Canine Campground: 435-259-7922. For lost dogs or problem dogs, call Animal Control at 435-259-8115.

Do you waive fees for volunteer groups?
As a self-sustaining program, we cannot afford to waive fees. We will, however, waive up to half of the camping fees for at least one full day of volunteer service. This half price fee is at the decision of the director.

We also have a scheduled volunteer service program that gives participants an annual pass for day-use valued at $25. Dates for these events are advertised in local papers and radio and usually held in the spring and fall.
The volunteer labor of local and visiting volunteer groups are important contributions to operations at the Sand Flats Recreation Area.


Moab 4-Wheeling

Moab is a must visit destination for those who love scenic adventures.


Help us Protect Moab's Public Land Treasures


The Moab area’s beauty, history, and, hundreds of miles of old mining roads and 4-wheel drive trails make it a place that will never be forgotten. Visitors can bring their own vehicle, rent a jeep, or take a tour with one of Moab’s experienced & permitted guides. Always remember that travel is limited to designated motorized routes only. Off-road travel is illegal.

Moab has a full range of backcountry trails, from easy 2-wheel drive backcountry scenic drives to the ultimate in challenging 4-wheel drive trails, providing an opportunity for all to experience the beauty and solitude of a backcountry adventure. Always obtain the most up-to-date information prior to departing for a trip, and be prepared. Remember, turning back is usually an option as well. Please choose your trail wisely, with honest appraisal of your equipment and experience in this terrain. Once you arrive in Moab, detailed 4-wheel drive maps and trail guides are available at the Moab Information Center (MIC), on the corner of Main & Center Streets. The MIC staff is always happy to assist you with your plans and provide information about current trail conditions.

The following trails were selected because they are close to Moab and short enough for a partial-day trip. Among the trails is a variety of scenery and a range of challenge to the off-highway abilities of vehicle and driver.

Difficulty

4-wheel driving difficulty is hard to describe objectively. Opinions vary, and an individual’s judgment may change considerably as they gain experience. The easiest of these trails is suitable for stock high-clearance four-wheel drive vehicles. The most difficult trails are barely passable to first-rate off-road equipment. The other trails are well within the capabilities of stock four-wheel-drive trucks and utility vehicles.
Trail Marking

The primitive nature of 4-wheel drive trails makes them hard to mark and keep marked. On some, routes are obscure, while on others, the roads are clear enough but the many unnamed junctions are confusing. Storms can alter roads and remove tracks, while vandals can spoil the markings. Nevertheless, a sign has been placed to identify each trail a short way into the trail. After that, routes and junctions are marked in ways appropriate for the terrain, wooden posts may have a “trail” sign, slickrock may have painted symbols, and most areas will have cairns -small rock piles-to show the route. Topographic maps provide additional help and add to the enjoyment of off-road travel.

Chicken Corners

Map ID: 1

Round Trip from Moab: 54 miles
4-Wheel Drive Road: 43 miles
Minimum Time: 3-1/2 hours
Difficulty: Moderate

The route travels the Colorado River Canyon just below Moab, follows a spectacular part of Kane Springs Canyon, climbs the Kane Creek anticline to Hurrah Pass, and descends to benches above the Colorado River. The trail dead-ends at Chicken Corners about 400 feet above the river across from Dead Horse Point.

Trail Directions

From Main Street at Center Street in Moab, travel south on Main 6/10 mile, turn right on Kane Creek Boulevard, follow it through two sweeping curves past its junction with 500 West and continue into the river canyon. When the pavement ends near Kane Creek [0.0], continue on the good gravel road as it enters Kane Springs Canyon and follows the canyon meanders at various levels above the creek. Continue with the gravel road as it crosses the mouth of Hunter Canyon at a hiking trailhead [3.2].

Further along, the canyon broadens, and you can see Hurrah Pass on the right. The gravel road changes to dirt at the ford of Kane Creek [6.4]. Do not attempt to ford in high water; the water can be window-deep following storms or heavy spring melts. Beyond the ford, stay with the best-looking road as other trails leave to the left in the next half mile, and the road will bend toward the north and begin to ascend the cliffs below Anticline Overlook (note the safety fence on the cliff edge above). The summit of this climb is Hurrah Pass [10.0]. As the trail winds down the other side of the anticline, it shows more four-wheel-drive character.

The trail leaves the cliffs on a gentler slope and drops into a wash bottom. Continue straight (out of the wash) where a spur trail leaves to the right and follows the rough wash bottom [12.5]. Shortly after that, an optional route enters a small canyon to the left; the preferred route up the rocky slope to the right swings close to the river on a bench above it. Farther on, two trail junctions [14.4 and 14.6] leave to the left in view of a large side canyon and a mound of red rocks not far to the left of the trail. These trails go to the rock mound and its interesting catacomb caves. The main trail continues along the river benches, which are capped with fossil-bearing limestone, until it crosses a major wash [17.1]. (On the return trip, you will probably spot an unusual arch near the trail east of the wash crossing.) The trail you may see starting up this wash is the Lockhart Basin trail. You follow the main trail straight across the wash and follow along the benches as they wind higher above the water.

The point where the trail is pinched between rocks on the left and the abyss on the right [20.3] is “Chicken Corners” where Moab area guides were reputed to allow “chicken” passengers to walk, rather than ride, past the narrow, sloping section of trail. The trail continues along the broad bench until it narrows to an old horse trail [21.5]. You can’t go much farther, even on foot, because this is the start of a peninsula of land bounded by the gooseneck of the Colorado, the trademark of the spectacular view from Dead Horse Point. Return to Moab by the same route.

Gemini Bridges

Map ID: 2

Round Trip from Moab: 48 miles
4-Wheel Drive Road: 14 miles
Minimum Time: 2-1/2 hours
Difficulty: Easy

The trail covers a region between US Highway 191 and SR 313, reaches some grand vistas, and accesses numerous other trails. The highlight is the spectacular twin arch, called Gemini Bridges, on the rim of an arm of Bull Canyon.

Trail Directions

From the center of Moab, travel north on US Highway 191 for 9.8 miles (you are still south of the SR 313 junction). Turn left to cross a cattle guard near an old ore car by the railroad tracks [0.0], cross the tracks, and turn left to follow the southerly dirt road paralleling the tracks. The main trail soon veers right toward the cliffs, and steadily climbs the cliff slope to Little Canyon, the gap in the cliff rim. Stay with the best maintained trail through upper Little Canyon (old mine trails leave left and right, and a strong spur trail leaves left into a side canyon). Turn right from the wash bottom area [4.8] to climb the steep dugway. The trail passes a gate and winds to higher levels, giving vistas in all directions. Stay with the main trail as spurs leave to the left, and fork right where the good left-hand trail leads to the lower levels of Bull Canyon [6.2] as it begins a sweeping bend to the right. This less-maintained trail is the older route; the graded road is not shown on many trail maps.

As the trail winds still higher, ignore two spur trails to the left and watch for the “Y”, junction that indicates that you are near Gemini Bridges. Keep left at the “Y” [7.4] and follow the markings; past visitors have left numerous unnecessary trails. As you approach the canyon, you will see the deep hole [7.8] that opens into the canyon wall leaving the twin spans. Return part way toward the “Y” junction, but take- the short-cut [8.0] to the left to join the main trail that was the right-hand fork of the “Y”. Turn left on this main trail [8.1], and turn right where a spur trail heads down to Crips Hole [9.0]. The trail joins the graded road that you were on earlier near a drill pad [9.7], and you travel the graded road westerly to paved SR 313 [13.8]. There, a right turn returns you to US Highway 191, while a left heads for Dead Horse Point State Park and the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park.

Fins and Things

Map ID: 3

Round Trip from Moab: 20 miles
4-Wheel Drive Road: 9.4 miles
Minimum Time: 3 hours
Difficulty: Difficult

Fins and Things is a one-way trail. It starts 1.9 miles from the Sand Flats Entrance Station (5 miles from downtown Moab), beside campsite ‘E-6’ in Echo Campground. For trailer parking, please park prior to this on the south side of Sand Flats Road 1.4 miles from Entrance Station. OHVs are permitted on the Sand Flats Road. The trail is marked with metal signs and white symbols painted on the slickrock surface. Due to hazardous terrain, it is recommended only for experienced drivers.

The first section between the start and Fox Campgrounds is not recommended for ATVs. ATV users should pick up the trail on the Sand Flats Road at the Diving Board Rock formation which is 3.7 miles from the Entrance Station. A fee is required to enter the Sand Flats Recreation Area.

  • Mile 0.0: Trailhead, 1.9 miles from Entrance Station on right.
  • Mile 0.0-0.3: Trail starts out as a gravel road before climbing up rock fin with white painted markers, trail signs and rock lining, then eventually up a slickrock dome to the base of a steep sand hill. Go straight here or follow the easier alternate route to your left, marked with white dots. Stay on marked trail.
  • Mile 0.8: Trail drops off fin to right, climbs up again, then drops to the right. Go left here.
  • Mile 1.4: Series of steep drops through a slickrock ravine. No alternate routes here. Stay on the trail.
  • Mile 1.8 Intersection at Fox Campground. Go right to base of steep rocky hill, or take easier alternate route to your left. Please be considerate when driving through campgrounds. Follow signs to Hawk Campground.
  • Mile 2.4: Hawk Campground. Toilet on your left, trail goes right.
  • Mile 2.5: Sand Flats Road. Turn right.
  • Mile 3.5: North entrance on left immediately after Diving Board Rock. Two-way travel for .6 miles
  • Mile 4.1 Intersection with Porcupine Jeep Trail; go left. One-way travel only.
  • Mile 5.4: Stay straight; spur to overlook on right.
  • Mile 5.6: Bear right; left goes to Radio Tower and Sand Flats Road.
  • Mile 6.1: Stay left at Wilderness Study Area boundary which is closed to all motorized travel.
  • Mile 6.7: Large canyon to right. Nice lunch stop with views of Arches National Park.
  • Mile 7.0: Cross ravine, climb slickrock to your right. Watch for symbols.
  • Mile 7.3-7.4: Climb fin, then hard right at Mile 7.4. Stay on marked route which is almost all slickrock.
  • Mile 7.7: Left is exit to main road (1/2 mile); right continues out on a fin.
  • Mile 8.1: Intersection; stay right. In 1/2 mile, you will cross here again.
  • Mile 8.6: Hard right, then left. Follow symbols on an up-and-down ride to mile 9.0.
  • Mile 9.0: Continue on trail 4/10 mile to main road.
  • Mile 9.4: Sand Flats Road. Right will take you to the Entrance Station and back to Moab.

Other Trails

The Red Rock 4-Wheelers is a non-profit club organized to bring together adventure loving individuals and families who share the common interest of active four-wheeling. Their objective is to encourage family recreation through safe and responsible operation of four-wheel-drive vehicles. They also seek to utilize public lands in a responsible manner as part of an effort to keep public land trails and roads available for multipurpose use. The club organizes one of Moab’s largest events, the annual Easter Jeep Safari, which consists of trail rides, mostly day long trips, departing from Moab throughout the 9 day-long event.

The club’s website contains a fantastic reference to most of the 4-wheel drive trails in the Moab area. Visit their website here: rr4w.com.

Long-Term Parking in Moab

Need somewhere to to park your vehicle or trailer overnight? Although the city of Moab does not have any public long-term parking areas, these companies provide safe, secure storage.

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Motorized Travel Routes


E-Bike Guide to Moab

The Moab area offers thousands of miles of excellent riding for e-bikes. These miles are primarily regulated as motorized routes; however, due to the capabilities of e-bikes in sand and added power for steep climbs, e-bikes are capable of enjoying new terrain that mountain bikes don’t generally venture to.

These routes are just a few of the lesser known options that are great on an e-bike.

Equipment NOTE: The routes on this page have been tested on a Class 1 eMTB with 27.5” x 2.8” tires and a 504 WH battery.

Moab Trail Mix
All information courtesy of Moab Trail Mix.

Current e-bike rules within Moab and Grand County

Rules and regulations concerning e-bikes, current as of November 25, 2020.
Note: In the Moab/Grand County area, the classes of e-bikes are not a factor. These rules apply to all e-bikes.

Moab City

  • e-bikes are welcome on all surface streets, and within on-street bike lanes.
  • e-bikes are considered motorized vehicles. (12.20.005)
  • On June 8, 2021, the Moab City Council passed Ordinance No. 2021-09 allowing Class 1 electric bicycles (“e-bikes”) on the City’s path systems and setting a 15 mile-per-hour speed limit on Mill Creek Parkway. A Class 1 e-bike is an electric bicycle equipped with a motor that provides assistance only when the rider is pedaling, and that ceases to provide assistance when the bicycle reaches the speed of 20 miles per hour.

Grand County

  • e-bikes (Class 1) are allowed on the non-motorized Moab Canyon pathway paralleling HWY 191 North, and the non-motorized pathway along the Colorado River beside HWY 128.
  • e-bikes are welcome on all open motorized trails.
  • e-bikes may not be used on trails designated for non-motorized use, and may not be used other than on legally designated trails. (17.07.040)
  • Violation is a Class B misdemeanor punishable by a sentence of up to six months in jail and $1,000. (17.08.010)

BLM

  • e-bikes are allowed on all open motorized roads and motorized trails.
  • e-bike use is prohibited on all non-motorized trails unless specifically authorized in writing by the local BLM District Manager. (43 CFR 8340)
  • Operation of an e-bike off designated roads and trails is a class A misdemeanor punishable by fine and/or imprisonment and/or forfeiture of vehicle.

US Forest Service

  • e-bikes are allowed on all open motorized roads and motorized trails.
  • e-bikes are considered motorized vehicles. (36 CFR 212.1)
  • e-bike use is prohibited on all non-motorized trails.

Arches and Canyonlands National Parks

  • e-bikes are allowed anywhere a regular bicycle is.
  • However, there are no singletrack trails open to bicycles in either park.

Dead Horse State Park

  • e-bikes (Class 1 only) are allowed on trails open to regular bicycles.

FLAT IRON MESA

Flat Iron Mesa Trail Map
Additional trail information available here.

Background

  • 15.23 miles – Lollipop loop
  • 1,352’ elevation gain
  • Difficulty: Intermediate/Advanced – Beginner option, out and back
  • Mix of loose and hard-packed doubletrack with advanced options.
  • Additional info: mtbproject.com/trail/7036624/flat-iron-mesa-loop

Description

If an escape from the crowds and scenic landscapes are what you’re looking for, this is the ride for you. You’ll be following along the top of a canyon with steep walls comprised of the Wingate sandstone formation. Many of Moab’s most scenic viewpoints are on this route.

From trailhead (TH), follow the 4X4 road north, parallel the highway into a wash, once in the wash the road turns left (west) and climbs out of the wash. Continue on this road west for 2.1 miles. At the T intersection turn left, and follow Flat Iron Mesa Rd. for 0.85 miles, turn right onto the Flat Iron Mesa 4×4 route signed with “FI” on signposts. From here, the trail makes a loop heading south, turning west, then heading north along the rim of Hatch Wash.

After 6.2 miles on the Flat Iron 4×4 route, you’ll intersect Flat Iron Mesa Rd. once again.

OPTION: Turning left, and continuing for 2.1 miles, northwest will take you to the end of Flat Iron Mesa Rd and a stunning overlook of the confluence of Kane Creek Canyon and Hatch Wash Canyon.

To return to the trailhead, turn right (southeast) and continue for 1.8 miles on Flat Iron Mesa Rd. to the first road you pedaled out on. Turn left (east) and follow the road back to the trailhead.

ADVANCED OPTION: Turn left after 1.6 miles for an added 2.25 miles on an advanced 4×4 road. After 2.25 miles, turn right (south) on the Gas Line Rd. and continue for 0.35 miles. Turn left (east) to return to the TH.

BEGINNER OPTION ROUTE: Start the route from the same Trailhead, but once to Flat Iron Mesa Road, turn right (north) and continue for 4.3 miles to the end of the road at Kane Creek Overlook. The return route is reversed.

Access

From Center St. and Main St. in Moab, drive south on Highway 191 for 18 miles. Just after crossing over Mule Shoe Canyon, turn right and park at the entrance of the 4×4 road.

Note: This trailhead is not signed along HWY 191. If struggling to find TH, you can start the route on Flat Iron Mesa Rd at its intersection with HWY191

SEVEN MILE RIM

Seven Mile Rim Trail Map
Additional trail information available here.

Background

  • 15.15 miles – Loop
  • 1,490’ elevation gain
  • Difficulty: Intermediate
  • 4×4 doubletrack with mixed packed, slickrock, and sandy stretches.
  • Open desert with scenic views of large sandstone mesas
  • Additional Info: mtbproject.com/trail/7036625/seven-mile-rim-loop

Description

The Seven Mile Rim route takes you through the rolling slickrock canyons of Tusher Canyon, past the tall desert towers of Determination Towers, along and between Monitor and Merrimac buttes, climbs Seven Mile Rim to a stunning view looking out into Arches National Park and the La Sal Mountains, before descending past Uranium Arch and Courthouse Rock back to the Trailhead. Use caution as this area has many alternative roads. Carry proper equipment for navigation.

From trailhead (TH), ride west for 0.1 mile, turn left and follow signs labeled 7R from here. Continue 2 miles to intersection of Tusher Canyon Rd., turn left (south). Continue up the canyon for 1.1 miles. Turn left (east), following signs marked “7R” and “M&M”. After 1.2 miles you will leave Tusher Canyon, and see Determination Towers to your south, turn right at this intersection following the sign to “7R”. Traveling south, past the Determination Towers, continue for 1.45 miles. You’re now at a strange four way intersection near Wipeout Hill, and just west of the Merrimac Butte.

Take the second left that heads to the south side of the Merrimac Butte. Continue east around the southern base of the Merrimac Butte for 1 mile. Continue through the middle of the two buttes, heading northeast, for 0.5 mile. Turn right (east), and continue straight for 0.7 mile, this stretch will have a few roads intersecting your path, however, continue straight until the T intersection. At T, turn left (north), in approximately 1500 feet stay right and continue on this road east, for 1.9 miles. This road primarily climbs east then turns north near the top of Seven Mile Rim. After 1.9 miles, turn left (west), to descend 0.3 mile to Uranium Arch. Once past the arch, continue north on roads marked “M&M” or “HWY 191” for 3.1 miles. Your final slickrock descent will take you past the east side of Courthouse Rock before intersecting the Cotter Mine Road. Turn left (northwest), on Cotter Mine Rd and continue for 1.5 miles to the Trailhead. There are many alternative roads in this last 3 mile section. By continuing north you will make your way to the Cotter Mine Road.

Access

From Center St. and Main St. in Moab, drive north on Highway 191 for 16 miles. Turn left onto Mill Canyon Rd. and proceed for 0.6 miles to the Mill Canyon, Tusher Canyon Trailhead.

Note: Tusher Canyon (west side of loop), during dry periods of the year can be difficult on an ebike with narrower tires due to sand. If on an ebike with tires narrower than 2.5”, riding this route in the opposite direction is advised.

POISON SPIDER MESA

Poison Spider Mesa Trail Map
Additional trail information available here.

Background

Description

From trailhead (TH), ride up the Poison Spider Mesa 4×4 road for 5.3 mi. This first section of the route will be retraced upon your return. Turn right at the Golden Spike/Poison Spider Mesa intersections. Proceed on Poison Spider Mesa for 2.8 miles to the top of the Portal Viewpoint.

Note: Portal Singletrack and Goldbar Rim Singletrack are non-motorized routes not open to e-bikes.
Heading northwest continue on the Portal Connector Road for 0.7 miles downhill toward the intersection of Golden Spike and Where Eagles Dare (WED). Follow route for WED for 0.4 miles (west), at the first intersection turn left (south), and continue for 0.25 miles.

OPTION: At this intersection turning right (west), will take you to the viewpoint of Dragonfly Canyon and Corona Arch.
To continue the route turn left (east), and continue on WED for 1 mile to the southern intersection of WED and Golden Spike. Turn right (south), on Golden Spike and continue for 1.6 miles back to the Poison Spider/Golden Spike intersection. This is the section of road you came out on. Continue straight, south, for 5.3 miles back to the Poison Spider Trailhead.

Access

From Center St. and Main St. in Moab, drive north on Highway 191 for 4.1 miles, turn left on Potash Rd. Highway 279. Proceed for 5.9 miles, turn right onto Poison Spider Mesa Road., proceed up the hill and park at the trailhead.

CAUTION: POISON SPIDER MESA HAS MANY ALTERNATIVE ROUTES AND DEAD END ROADS. IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED YOU CARRY A MAP AND GPS UNIT WHILE EXPLORING THIS AREA. POISON SPIDER MESA IS CLIFFED OUT ON ALL SIDES AND THE JEEP ROAD IS THE ONLY WAY ON AND OFF THE MESA FOR EBIKES.

OTHER TRAIL OPPORTUNITIES

Dead Horse Point State Park

Dead Horse Point State Park
  • Beginner – Intermediate singletrack
  • 19+ miles of singletrack – many loop options

With the most iconic Moab views, and fun purpose built singletrack this is a must do. Entry fee is required, map included upon entry of park.

Visitor Center Phone: 435-259-2614

Website: stateparks.utah.gov/parks/dead-horse/

Sand Flats Recreation Area, Slickrock Bike Trail

Sand Flats Recreation Area
  • Advanced singletrack entirely on sandstone.
  • 15+ miles – many loop options

One of the most unique experiences you will ever have on two wheels. Other great options within Sand Flats include Hells Revenge and Fins and Things. Fee required at booth, map included upon entry.

Phone: 435-259-2444
Website: sandflats.org

Sovereign Singletrack Trail System

Intermediate-advanced singletrack

20+ miles – Many loop options

Located on Sovereign Utah State Lands 12 miles north of Moab. These trails traverse fun terrain with many loop options making it easy to ride as long as you like.

Trail Description: mtbproject.com/trail/231528/sovereign

E-BIKE GUIDELINES FOR THE MOAB AREA

"Electric assisted bicycle" means a bicycle with an electric motor that:

  1. has a power output of less than 750 watts;
  2. has fully operable pedals on permanently affixed cranks;
  3. is fully operable as a bicycle without the use of the electric motor

ON FEDERAL PUBLIC LANDS in the Moab area, BLM and Forest Service, e-bikes are allowed on all open motorized roads and motorized trails. E-bikes are NOT allowed on designated non-motorized mountain bike trails.

Policy updates issued by the BLM on October 22, 2019 state that e-bike use is prohibited on existing designated non-motorized bicycle trails unless authorized by the local BLM District Manager. The BLM Moab Field Office is currently exploring options to expand e-biking recreation opportunities in the area. This process involves environmental assessments and public comment periods to investigate what impacts e-bikes may have on other user groups, wildlife, and trail conditions. Please respect the current regulations as this process takes place.

ON UTAH STATE PUBLIC LANDS, SITLA, Sovereign, and Utah State Parks, e-bikes are classified as non-motorized and are categorized by three classes.

  • Class 1: Provides assistance when pedaled up to 20 MPH
  • Class 2: Provides assistance via pedaling or a throttle up to 20 MPH
  • Class 3: Provides assistance when pedaled up to 28 MPH

We all share our right to enjoy public lands. Please use them respectfully and within the laws that govern them.

Biocrust

E-BIKES AND OTHER USERS

E-Bikes on Shared Use Trails

  • Stop for cyclists, hikers, runners and horseback riders.
  • STAY ON THE TRAIL – Ride to the edge of the trails surface and lean out away from the other rider to protect sensitive biological crusts. Do not ride off trail to get out of the way!
  • Passing from behind, alert the other rider of your presence, slow down, and give them time to pull over in an appropriate spot. Be patient, don’t rush them.
  • When passing other users on a road, slow down and announce your presence before passing.
  • When riding around blind corners, always slow down and anticipate other users.

E-Bikes and Horseback Riders

  • Always announce yourself from a long distance before approaching an equestrian.
  • Once the rider acknowledges you, they will give instructions on how to proceed past.
  • Never pass a horseback rider unexpectedly as this can startle the horse and cause injury to the rider.

E-Bikes and Other Motorized Users

  • Yield to one another and stop as appropriate.
  • Pull over only in wide areas like washes or on rock.
  • When encountering a 4×4 vehicle driving up or down ledges or on steep loose surfaces, get the driver’s attention before attempting to pass and signal how many more are coming.
  • You are on a maneuverable machine; be courteous and yield right of way to larger vehicles.

LOCAL KNOWLEDGE

Be Prepared

  • Make sure your e-bike battery is fully charged.
  • Carry tools to fix mechanical breakdowns.
  • Have at least one gallon of water per person per day, extra food, and appropriate clothing for unexpected weather conditions.
  • Let someone know where you are going before heading out, carry maps for the area you are planning of going.
  • Cell phone coverage is limited outside of the Moab Valley; do not rely solely on your cell phone for navigation or rescue.

Desert Trail Conditions

Moab trails feature steep sandstone and stretches of sand that can drain your battery faster than riding on hard-packed trails. Plan your mileage with this in mind. Keep a close eye on your battery consumption, and adjust your ride and power settings accordingly.

Navigation

Know your route and bring accurate maps. The most accurate and frequently updated maps for the Moab area are the Latitude 40, Moab East and Moab West maps, and National Geographic North and South Moab maps. These maps have the most accurate road and trail info and also highlight popular OHV routes that are great for e-bikes. Do not rely solely on the information on this page for navigation.

Desert Weather

Always plan for adverse, changing conditions. Flash floods can affect most the trails in the area leaving you on the wrong side of a creek for minutes or hours.

Desert weather can be unpredictable. Fast moving thunder and lightning storms, along with heavy rains and even unexpected snow showers can hit with little notice.

High daily temperatures in summer months (June-August) are consistently over 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 Celsius). Heat stroke and heat exhaustion are common in summer months. To help avoid this life threatening issue, ride in the early morning or in the evening and rest during the hottest part of the day.

PRACTICE MINIMUM IMPACT

E-bikes have more power than traditional mountain bikes, are lighter than motorcycles and seem capable of going just about anywhere. It is the rider’s responsibility to respect the desert and the laws of our public lands to preserve our right to enjoy them into the future. Limiting your impact reduces the amount of maintenance required to keep trails open. Stay precisely on the designated routes and don’t widen or ride off the trail for any reason. Respect trail signage, info kiosks, and other amenities found at trailheads.

Pack It In, Pack It Out

Decomposition in the desert is slow. Please pack out all trash, including garbage, food waste, human waste and toilet paper. Trash does not disappear, other humans must remove it!

Human Waste in the Desert

  • Pack it out! Grand County requires you to pack out all human waste (Poo and toilet paper) from public lands.
  • Wag bags are available from local gear stores and are the most sanitary system of disposal.

Moab Trail Mix
All information courtesy of Moab Trail Mix.